Calenture and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by goldstone_books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact. The spine may show signs of wear. All orders are dispatched within 1 working day from our UK warehouse. Established in 2004, we are dedicated to recycling unwanted books on behalf of a number of UK charities who benefit from added revenue through the sale of their books plus huge savings in waste disposal. No quibble refund if not completely satisfied.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Calenture Paperback – 13 Oct 1994

4 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£0.01
Paperback, 13 Oct 1994
£0.01
Available from these sellers.



Product details

  • Paperback: 565 pages
  • Publisher: Feature; New edition edition (13 Oct. 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0747245533
  • ISBN-13: 978-0747245537
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 17.9 x 4.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 597,440 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Wendy C. Darling on 14 Oct. 2002
Format: Hardcover
Absolutely fabulous read unlike anything else I've read with the possible exception of Satyricon, which is also in a class by itself by virtue of being so strange and wonderulf. Full of phantasmagoric imagery with an over the top fantasy storyline, Calenture also provides intense drama as well as much food for thought. The framing device of the story is also extraordinarily well done, turning a cliche on its head and providing an ending which far exceded my expecations, which were very high considering the build-up throughout the book and my admiration for this author. This book is a true work of art and a classic I can imagine being studied in schools one day as a prime example of an author whose imagination truly creates magic out of words.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By A Customer on 27 Jan. 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a book to get lost in, a dream, a narrative of a dissipative reality that is both impossible and unsettlingly close. I did not like the amateurish cover picture, this book deserves something powerful and surreal on its cover.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lucy on 16 May 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book is an exploration of realities. It was the first Storm Constantine book I read and it inspired me to seek out more of her work. In it you are never sure if the character Casmeer has invented the other lead characters, or if they exist elsewhere in his world. Combine that with stunning imagery (flying cities following paths of stones on the ground) and totally involving characterisation and you have an incredible book. I have read it many times and still keep going back. Every reading reveals a new level. A must for all fans of fantasy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Wendy C. Darling on 7 Feb. 2003
Format: Paperback
Absolutely fabulous read unlike anything else I've read with the possible exception of Satyricon, which is also in a class by itself by virtue of being so truly strange and wonderful. Full of phantasmagoric imagery with an over the top fantasy storyline, Calenture also provides intense drama as well as much food for thought. The framing device of the story is also extraordinarily well done, turning a cliche on its head and providing an ending which far exceded my expecations, which were very high considering the build-up throughout the book and my admiration for this author. This book is a true work of art and a classic I can imagine being studied in schools one day as a prime example of an author whose imagination truly creates magic out of words.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Delicious Weirdness 31 Jan. 2004
By Kseniya Slavsky - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Oh, weirdness incarnate! I love this woman! Sheesh... and I thought Wraeththu was an experience!
Calenture is like nothing else and like a whole lot of things: an exotic dream, a drugged-up trip, a philosopher's dissertation in the key of "I think, therefore I am," a rabbit hole complete with its Alice, times three. It's existential, it's entertaining, it's just plain odd. Wonderful. And it has the greatest conclusion I've ever read. It's both absolutely predictable and absolutely unexpected and entirely satisfying. It brings everything into focus like the snap of Storm's magical fingers.
The plot... Well, there's a man named Casmeer, who lives in a city in the mountains, far from any other settlements, if such exist. It's sort of an island of civilization. The civilization has a little problem: every person in the city has crystallized - turned into crystal statues. All except Casmeer, who's been living all alone for over four hundred years, protecting what remains of the others from being dismembered by bird-monkeys that like shiny things.
Casmeer's been writing a history of the city and its people. He has been entertaining himself in this fashion, but he is starting to feel the weight of the years and wants to try something new. He starts writing a fiction, trying to guess at what life is like elsewhere.
There is a flatland surrounded by the mountains. The flatlands are inhabited by floating, crawling, flying cities. Each city is its own world, dramatically weird. Casmeer invents two characters, Ays and Finnigin, and sends them on rather pointless journeys to find mysterious somethings. A mysterious stranger follows them and helps them along - or not. The stranger is Casmeer's fictional representation of himself, but then so are Ays and Finnigin.
The story alternates between Casmeer's diary and the fictional stories of Ays and Finnigin. The lines between reality and creativity blur. A collection of the most ridiculously random events accumulates with no point in sight and the more you read, the more you see some weird sort of sense in it all. You know, for a fact, that it's all going somewhere. It's like the proverbial big picture floating just beyond your range of vision. Then - BOOM! A conclusion that brings things together in the most mind-boggling way. It's amazing!
This book is a journey and an experience and I cannot recommend it enough to anyone. It would be cruel to deprive yourself of this. It's too unique.
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Formulaic fantasy, this is not 19 Nov. 2002
By Professor J - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Stock up the larder before you read this book. Shut off the phone. Seriously---you're going to need some quiet time for this.
This is not to say that I didn't like Storm Constantine's "Calenture." I actually thought it was brilliant, and fascinating. But boy, was it a hard read.
This is because a) it's a story within a story that goes back out to the external story, b) it takes place in a world that might be an hallucination, and c) it's just plain weird.
There are two stories in this book. The first is the very simple one of a man named Casmeer, who is basically the last man alive in his neck of the woods. Said neck of the woods is a fantastic city called Thermidore, which was once the pinnacle of civilization. At the height of that civilization, however, the alchemists of the city came up with what they believed to be the formula for an immortality serum. Whoops---turns out that after 50 years or so, people who have consumed this serum begin to slowly turn into crystal statues. Several hundred years later, only Casmeer is left. He doesn't know why, but he seems to be the only person on whom the serum actually worked the way it was supposed to. He leads a lonely life, tending the empty city and trying to protect the statues of his fellow citizens from strange creatures called plumosites who magpie-ishly try to steal bits of the shiny statues.
One day, however, he comes up with a new way to pass the time. He starts by wondering what happens to the shining pieces of the statues when the plumosites take them away. From this kernel of an idea, he decides to write a novel set in a world where all cities are mobile, either creeping along on crawlers or strange mechanisms, or even flying through the air. A mysterious race of gypsy-like people called terranauts guides the movement of the cities by laying down trails of---gasp---magical shiny stones, which seem to be oddly alive...
Surprise! This is the second story in the book, which takes up the bulk of the volume. Casmeer's story is relegated to footnotes at the end of each chapter, from here on. The second story focuses on two characters, Ays and Finnigin.
Ays is a beautiful, proud young priest/mercy killer (yes, mercy killer; that's his job) who lives in a flying city called Min. He's quite content with his life until one day one of his patients asks him a number of disturbing questions that cause him to wonder about his past and identity in ways he never has before. Where did he come from? Who was his mother? Unable to regain the serenity he once enjoyed, he decides to leave Min, to discover his true origins.
Meanwhile, the story also follows Finnigin, a young terranaut. All terranauts must leave their home-tribe and go on a journey to prove their adulthood, so Finnigin sets out to do this, hoping to discover the secret of the shiny stones while he's at it.
The story follows each young man's adventures as they travel through this world---first separately, and then together. Each of the cities is its own bizarre little fantasy-realm: in one, the citizens all think of themselves as actors, and they live carefully-scripted lives and rate one another on their performances (children are kept in an orphanage until they grow old enough to learn their lines). In another city, strangers are kept in beautiful towers and treated like kings for sixty days, then dumped into a river with a gold weight tied to their feet. All of the cities are fascinating in some way, and some have more shadows than others. There are other places, too, that the travelers visit---a flying train that travels from city to city, bearing passengers who (mostly) never leave; a rare stationary city, which seems to be the healthiest place in this world (but most of its citizens are nearly blind); a village that exists on the back of a giant trundling insect.
This is fascinating stuff---perhaps most fascinating when the lines between Casmeer's real life and the story he's writing begin to blur together, for both Casmeer and the reader. Is Casmeer's story just a story, or has he somehow tapped into a real (maybe parallel) world? Is the mysterious figure that Ays and Finigin encounter throughout the book Casmeer, in some kind of strange allegorical form? Is Casmeer himself real? Deep questions, which sometimes aren't given specific answers.
So once again, Storm Constantine has proven her ability to write her butt off. She's got a stunning imagination and it really shows here; the complex world-building that went into Wraeththu is taken even further in this masterpiece. This is a world which contains multiple smaller worlds---each of which could be the focus of a single fantasy novel. This is a world where the sane keep moving, and only the insane stand still---but since the sane never leave their cities, and the insane do, who's moving and who's really stationary? Contradictions like this are everywhere in the novel, and so intricately-connected and perfectly-plausible that... that... I'm just in awe. =)
So this one's a definite recommend, but only for people who are prepared to put some effort into it. It's not formulaic fantasy, or light reading. This book requires thought and immersion---but your efforts will be rewarded. =)
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Buy it! 13 July 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Storm Constantine's 'Calenture' must be the most underrated (or should that be overlooked?) fantasy novel of the last decade. I'm thrilled it has been republished, and hope it remains in print for years to come. Gushing finished, it's time to get pedantic and annoying. Stark House Press's presentation of this gem is very disappointing: small, slightly faded-looking print which makes the pages look almost Xeroxed; the original frontispiece (a line drawing of a flying city) was omitted; woeful typesetting-the font does not lend itself to the tone of the book all, and the indentation on each paragraph is unusually wide and distracting. And, of course, it's one of those horrid large format paperbacks (economical, I guess, which is understandable). For me, having cherished the original for so many years, such sloppy presentation is a travesty. New 'Calenture' readers probably won't care about such tripe as this, and would rightly think I need to get a life, but I would urge those who have purchased this copy seek out a first edition or first edition paperback (Headline, 1994), both of which I believe are available through Constantine's back catalogue at Immanion Press via [...] for the true 'Calenture' experience!
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Dreamscapes 24 July 2002
By "uulemnts" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This novel is a dreamscape of imagery. The novel delves into the fundamental reality of storytelling itself while asking more questions than it answers. If you like your books to make you think, this is definitely the book for you. It is just amazingly
descriptive and rivals most American authors can do.
Not Your Everyday Storm Constantine... 30 Mar. 2007
By J. Levine - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I'm less than 100 pages from the end and still can't tell where it's going to land exactly. I've been a fan of Constantine's Wraethu works for a few years now. I thought this might include a similar vein, and have been happily surprised by the new territory charted by this bold exploration of the imagination on many levels. If you haven't sampled Constantine's work before I can guarantee you'll be surprised one way or another.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback