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The Caldwell Objects and How to Observe Them (Astronomers' Observing Guides) [Kindle Edition]

Martin Mobberley
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Book Description

The Messier's catalog of 109 'non-stellar' objects is still used by amateur astronomers as a guide to interesting objects to view and image. In 1995 the notable English astronomer and broadcaster Sir Patrick Moore published his own catalog of a further 109 objects, to complement the Messier catalog and provide an extended list of fascinating targets for amateur astronomers. He called it the Caldwell Catalog (Sir Patrick's full name is Patrick Alfred Caldwell-Moore), the 'M' designation having already been used by Messier. Some of the objects included are Caldwell 11 (The Bubble Nebula), spiral galaxy Calwell 30, and Caldwell 49 and 50 (The Rosette Nebulae).Along with Messier's list and Herschel's list of mostly faint 'non-stellar' objects, the Caldwell objects are now programmed into many automated telescope controllers. This allows all of these objects to be located easily even by newcomer astronomers. The Caldwell objects are just as spectacular as the 'M' objects, especially when using the large telescopes and the sensitive CCD cameras readily available today.The Caldwell Objects and How to Observe Them comprehensively describes all of the 109 Caldwell objects, with specific advice on how to find them (if necessary with a 'Go-To' telescope), how to visually observe or image them, and how to image-process the results. There is information about the optimum astronomical equipment to use for each object and, for those who prefer to make sketches, there is advice on drawing these extended objects at the eyepiece.


Product Description

Review

From the reviews:

“A well balanced, expert and practical book with which to arm oneself before setting about the Caldwell Objects, which will appeal to amateur astronomers at all levels of experience. In his usual style the author introduces some humour into the text … . I recommend you buy The Caldwell Objects and how to observe them.” (Gordon Rogers, Journal of the British Astronomical Association, Vol. 120 (1), 2010)

“If you’re tired of the same old Messier objects and want to see something that doesn’t have an ‘M’ number, The Caldwell Objects And How To Observe them is definitely for you. Its detailed information tells you how best to observe the 109 deep-sky objects … . Mobberley’s book … has all the depth and usefulness you need. Overall … this is a very practical and highly recommended book.” (Paul Money, Sky at Night Magazine, March, 2010)

“Book, as expected, is primarily concerned with the description and details of the Caldwell objects and these are covered to the depth suitable for an amateur astronomer. … It sets out to be a reference book … . author’s personality and humour does come through in his writing, making the book an easv and enjoyable read … . charts do provide the reader with the general location in the sky and for this they are useful. … I would happily add it to my collection.” (Simon Dawes, The Observatory, Vol. 130, August, 2010)

Review

From the reviews: “A well balanced, expert and practical book with which to arm oneself before setting about the Caldwell Objects, which will appeal to amateur astronomers at all levels of experience. In his usual style the author introduces some humour into the text … . I recommend you buy The Caldwell Objects and how to observe them.” (Gordon Rogers, Journal of the British Astronomical Association, Vol. 120 (1), 2010) “If you’re tired of the same old Messier objects and want to see something that doesn’t have an ‘M’ number, The Caldwell Objects And How To Observe them is definitely for you. Its detailed information tells you how best to observe the 109 deep-sky objects … . Mobberley’s book … has all the depth and usefulness you need. Overall … this is a very practical and highly recommended book.” (Paul Money, Sky at Night Magazine, March, 2010) “Book, as expected, is primarily concerned with the description and details of the Caldwell objects and these are covered to the depth suitable for an amateur astronomer. … It sets out to be a reference book … . author’s personality and humour does come through in his writing, making the book an easv and enjoyable read … . charts do provide the reader with the general location in the sky and for this they are useful. … I would happily add it to my collection.” (Simon Dawes, The Observatory, Vol. 130, August, 2010)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 7289 KB
  • Print Length: 273 pages
  • Publisher: Springer New York; 1 edition (3 Oct. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008BBJ8VM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #725,143 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Astronomy Book 8 April 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Martin Mobberley has made a realy good job in this book. The directions and information about each nebula or galaxy are copious
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5.0 out of 5 stars Nice product 23 Jun. 2014
By fran
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Nice product, with lots of details and clues. I recommended to have it like a quick guide. Is not the same as look it in internet.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK, what's next? Here is the "109 Caldwell objects" 28 Oct. 2009
By Busy Bee - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Following an unwritten ritual many amateur astronomers will pursue an observation path through the heavenly bodies starting with the moon, planets, deep sky objects [Messier Objects, Herschel Objects and of course the Caldwell objects]. It's like the Rite-of-passage to attain your "Amateur Astronomer" insignia. This group of books from Springer are a good companion on this little journey through the heavens. So, here is another one of these little books dedicated to the "109 Caldwell objects".

The Book consists of 4 chapters, with each chapter dedicated to a specific topic to bring this whole book together.

+Chapter 1: An introduction the man himself "Sir Patrick Caldwell-Moore" who has enriched us for many years with his knowledge and efforts as a leading amateur astronomer.

+Chapter 2: Offers a Summary of the 109 Caldwell objects, for each object you get:
Page 1
- Some bullet information such as Magnitude, Size, Star hope, Best Visual Aperture, Best Visual Filter, CCD/DSLR, Celestial Neighbours, Miscellaneous and a few more.
- Some 20 to 30 lines of text with General description for each object. Tips on locating and observing the object and a bit of its history and interesting information.
Page [2]
- A Picture of the object, mostly a high quality image and some times a Star Map to help locate the object and other close by objects.
- Mostly an empty half page. "Yes Empty"

+Chapter 3: A few pages on how to visually observe the Caldwell Objects.
+Chapter 4: A few pages on how to digitally observe the Caldwell Objects.

How do I feel about the book?
Sorry, but the book has a few short comings, the claim that it "Comprehensively describes all of the 109 Caldwell objects" is not all that accurate; barley a few bullet notes and a 20 to 30 lines of text with General description for each object does not qualify as "Comprehensive". Other books set that bar higher with a lot more details on the Astrophysics and History of each object along with the Observation details.
The two tiny chapters about Visual and digital observation barley touch the subjects. They skim through the topics Information about the optimum astronomical equipment. Some may argue that these two chapters are not needed as there are books out there dedicated to best observation practices.
The empty half page that exists after nearly each object could have been used better to illustrate how the object looks through the eyepiece for an observer for example. I like the idea that each object occupies its own page but this space can be used for something useful.
No maps exist of the Constellations' and the Objects, so for that you need to get you star atlas or some of the materials on the internet. It would have been lovely to have a nice foldable insert with a map showing all the objects.

In conclusion, the book is "A Simple list with a brief summary of the 109 Caldwell objects". Other books in the series about Nebulas, Galaxies and start clusters etc. are more oriented to giving you information about the Astrophysics and Science behind each category of objects and how to observe them more comprehensively.
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 28 Jan. 2015
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
great reference, more things to look for in the night sky
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still another invaluable guide. 4 April 2013
By Greg Dohrman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The Caldwell Objects named after Sir Patrick Caldwell-Moore are some of the most crasy yet wonderful deep sky gems that make up this side of our Milky Way Galaxy.
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