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El Caballero Negro (The Black Knight)


Price: £22.47 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

El Caballero Negro (The Black Knight) + Ivanhoe (import) + Knights of the Round Table [DVD] [1953]
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Product details

  • Actors: Harry Andrews, Peter Cushing, Anthony Bushell, Laurence Naismith, Ronald Adam
  • Directors: Tay Garnett
  • Producers: The Black Knight
  • Format: Import, PAL, Widescreen
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Run Time: 88.00 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B005PZTCYK
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 146,532 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Spain released, PAL/Region 0 DVD: LANGUAGES: English ( Dolby Digital 2.0 ), Spanish ( Dolby Digital 2.0 ), Spanish ( Subtitles ), WIDESCREEN (1.85:1), SPECIAL FEATURES: Interactive Menu, Scene Access, SYNOPSIS: Alan Ladd once more journeyed to England to make a film for Columbia's British counterpart (Warwick Studios), and the result was the lively swashbuckler The Black Knight. Ladd plays John, a young swordmaker who aspires to join the Knights of the Round Table. Unfortunately, he is falsely accused of cowardice and banished from his community. Thanks to the secret tutelage of one of Arthur's knights, John is able to train himself in the art of combat, and soon reemerges as the vengeance-seeking Black Knight. In this guise, he is able to bring a group of traitors to justice, rout a band of invading Saracens, and rescue his lady love Linet (Patricia Medina) from certain doom. Anthony Bushell, who was soon to completely forsake acting in favor of producing and directing, costars as King Arthur, while the villains of the piece are essayed by Peter Cushing and future Dr. Who Patrick Troughton. ...The Black Knight

Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bob Salter TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 Nov 2014
Format: DVD
What is it about those days of old when knights were bold and paper wasn't invented, that they all had American accents.....umm.....that is if you believe the Hollywood versions. Robert Taylor was a very American Lancelot in "Knights of the Round Table"(53). Even Bing Crosby turned up at Camelot as "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court"(49). Perhaps the funniest was hearing Tony Curtis's distinct Bronx accent in "The Black Shield of Falworth"(54). Not quite as unintentionally funny is Alan Ladd, old Shane himself, popping up in "The Black Knight"(54), in a film that has more resemblance to the world of Shrek than Arthurian legend. It was the last of Ladd's trilogy of films for London based Warwick Films.

This one has Ladd as the rather elderly blacksmith who has to prove himself to Arthur's knights and a very pretty young lady of course, that he has what it takes to cut the mustard amongst the ranks of those illustrious knights. Up against him are the very dastardly Peter Cushing as a spectacularly overdressed Saracen, and Patrick Troughton as a very naughty Cornish King. The Cornish may find this film offensive! The film assails us with a veritable tsunami of corn. There are a lot of extras indulging in some ultra unrealistic fighting. Things have come on since 1954! All this takes place in a smorgasbord of landscapes that does not always do justice to England's green and pleasant land. More it's scorched and arid land, as it was filmed around impressive castle locations in Spain. The `piece de resistance' is the Stonehenge sequence, with wailing druids and dancers that do a sprightly version of "Pans People", and very nice they look as well, even if to no purpose! The polystyrene looking stones, in an arid landscape, looking rather unfamiliar to this Wiltshireman!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Spike Owen TOP 500 REVIEWER on 19 Feb 2014
Format: DVD
Ah the swords and shields movie, a once thriving genre of film from yore where big bucks was thrown at the productions, and spectacle was unleashed. There were one or two exceptions, mind...

Directed by Tay Garnett, produced by Irving Allen and Albert R. Broccoli and starring Alan Ladd, Peter Cushing and a whole host of British thespians lining up for some costume shenanigans. Story is a reworking of Arthurian England, with Ladd as a brave blacksmith who reinvents himself as the Black Knight to foil a dastard plan to overthrow King Arthur, and of course to impress the Lady Linet (Patricia Medina) who he has the major hots for. Sword play, fights, swinging about, jousts and Royal machinations do follow.

In the context of its budget it's hardly the awful stinker some have lined up to proclaim it as. Oh it definitely has problems, not the least that Ladd is badly miscast and Medina just isn't good enough, but there's a great sense of fun about the whole thing. One only has to look at Cushing's performance as the villainous Sir Palamides, he's having a great old time of it prancing about in tights and smothered in so much make-up he looks like a Satsuma! If you can get into Cushing's mindset then there's fun to be had here, intentionally or otherwise!

It's very colourful, costuming is impressive and with Garnett the wise old pro not wasting any chance for an action scene - or to encourage his male cast members into macho posturing - it's never dull. True, the editing is shoddy, the script (Alec Coppel) poor and some of the choreography is amateurish, but this is medieval malarkey 101. A film for the forgiving genre fan whose after a simple hour and half of robust swordery and chastity belt tamperings. 6/10
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The CinemaScope Cat TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 24 Sep 2013
Format: DVD
A blacksmith (Alan Ladd) in the service of the Earl of Yeonil (Harry Andrews) is in love with the Earl's daughter (Patricia Medina). When Cornish men disguised as Vikings attack and burn the Earl's castle, the blacksmith adopts the identity of The Black Knight and attempts to foil a plan by a traitorous pagan (Patrick Troughton) and a Saracen (Peter Cushing) to usurp King Arthur's (Anthony Bushell) throne. This rather stodgy tale of knights in shining armor and damsels in distress can't stand on its own and when placed against a superior example of the genre like IVANHOE or even the lesser BLACK SHIELD OF FALWORTH, its inadequacies are glaring. Poor Alan Ladd is not only too old but he looks terrible, tired and pudgy, and he isn't helped by a disfiguring wig (at least I hope it's a wig!). As the only American in the all British cast, he's terribly out of place as a medieval knight. The only moment of real fun is a kitschy Hammeresque sequence with pagan maidens bumping and grinding around stone phallic symbols during a virgin sacrifice while friars are burned in baskets. Other than that respite, it's a rather plodding affair. Directed by Tay Garnett. With Andre Morell, Laurence Naismith and Ronald Adam.

The Spanish DVD courtesy of Llamentol is an adequate transfer which could have used some restoration work. It's in anamorphic wide screen (1.85).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michael Sommer on 27 April 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A good film of it's kind, though I can't give it top marks. But if you like swords and knight adventures, it's good.
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Format: DVD
In the summer of 1952 Alan Ladd and his family sailed to England on the "Ile De France" and set up home in Surrey; having signed a three-picture deal in England with Warwick Film Productions. The three films being THE RED BERET (1953), HELL BELOW ZERO (1954) and THE BLACK KNIGHT (1954) all released through Columbia Pictures. In between the second and third of the above films he went off to Canada to film SASKATCHEWAN (1954). These four films all added up to an eighteen month tax break from Uncle Sam! "The Black Knight" was the last and most unlikely of Ladd's self-imposed tax exile films not helped by a broken ankle early on and a typhoid epidemic during filming in Spain. It must've been with some relief that he boarded the "S.S. United States" bound for America, returning to more familiar territory in the big-budget western DRUMBEAT (1954) for his own newly formed Jaguar Productions with Delmar Daves in the director's chair.

Once-upon-a-time John (Alan Ladd) a common blacksmith and swordsmith at Camelot aspires to become a Knight of the Round Table not least as he seeks the hand of the beautiful Lady Linet (Patricia Madina) daughter of his employer the Earl Of Yeonil (Harry Andrews). with the help of Sir Ontzlake (André Morell) himself a former commoner teaches John the art of combat and chivalry on completion he adopts the guise of the mysterious "Black Knight" and sets forth to do battle for King Arthur (Anthony Bushell) and Camelot against the evil doers Sir Palamides (Peter Cushing) and King Mark (Patrick Troughton) who are leading Saracens and Cornish men who are disguised as Vikings in a bid to take over the country.
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