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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 17 October 2011
Thoroughly enjoyed all 3 books in the Jarrow series, well worth reading. I was captivated in all three and could not wait to start the next one.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 9 November 2009
Very good book recieved on time and in excellent condition Great story line part of a trilogy related to Catherine Cooksons life story .
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 28 December 2011
This trilogy of books is a lovely read which gives an insight into how it was living in Jarrow in the early years, the hardships of one family and how they manage to get by day after day, a great holiday read, wanted the series to continue after the third book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 14 March 2012
Having thoroughly enjoyed the first of the Jarrow Tirlogy I embarked upon a reading of this second story with enthusiasm and was not disappointed.
I was gripped from the start. It was necessary to repeat some of the first story (I suppose that this was in case the reader had not read or perhaps remembered the first.} This was not done immediately but skilfully inserted at an appropriate point.
If you have read the first book and enjoyed it you will be most interested to see how Kate continued her life.
It would be a pity to reveal the plot so all I can say is that it is a well crafted, truly authentically historical in detail and a gripping yarn in a similar style to Catherine Cooksons.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 11 January 2012
The second in the Jarrow Trilogy. Building on the Jarrow Lass and leaving me wanting more and moving on to the Return to Jarrow at 5.00 o'clock in the morning. During the Christmas break I read all three as they were addictive. I was Kate and Catherine; I felt their pain and pleasure; I was totally transported into their world and smelt the stench of the Slack and the sweet smelling grass of Ravensworth. Brilliant descriptions, in depth explanations, all were handled with care and vigour.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 9 January 2012
An excellent story and written in Macleod's recognisable hand. Full of colour laughter and heartache. Just make sure your Kindle batteries are well charged because you need to read all three books! You won't want to put them down. In fact I've bought the paper backs for my daughter, since she does not have a Kindle, and she too is finding it an excellent read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 19 December 2012
I read the three of this trilogy and have to say that the second book was the most depressing. Research was good. The trilogy itself was depressing and I had to stop reading the third book so far. Author will never be Catherine Cookson.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 15 May 2013
I enjoyed this story very much. Janet MacLeod Trotter's characters are totally believable and she describes people's circumstances in a way that opens one's eyes to the extreme poverty and hardship experienced during the depression.
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on 12 November 2012
I'm not a good reader, except when I am on holiday! However, I read the 1st book of this trilogy on holiday and immediately downloaded the 2nd (A Child of Jarrow) when I came home as I wanted to know the next part of the story. At times it made for hard reading and reduced me to tears at what was a really sad and tragic story of what it must have been like to live in this era, in poverty and how tough it was for children to grow up. This really came across well in the book and the writers detail made it easy to imagine what it must have been like. I am now on the final book of the trilogy as I really want to know what the outcome of the story is, which is not like me at all. Well worth reading.
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on 29 August 2013
This book is every bit as good as the first one in this trilogy. You really get into the heart and soul of Kate and Rose and feel their sorrow and relish in the few moments of love and happiness. Family life was hard in North East England at the turn of the century. There was often little work for the menfolk and the women took any job they could get to keep their family together. .Janet McCleod Trotted is a brilliant writer. She tells the story exactly as it was at that time and she describes her characters so clearly that you feel at one with them and can picture them in your minds eye. I cannot wait to read the final part of the trilogy.
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