or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Byzantine Imperial Acts to Venice, Pisa and Genoa, 10th - 12th Centuries: A Comparative Legal Study [Paperback]

D. Penna

RRP: 54.50
Price: 52.09 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 2.41 (4%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Usually dispatched within 8 to 13 days.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Book Description

30 Sep 2012 9490947776 978-9490947774 Mul
For some 1000 years, the South-Eastern part of Europe was under the sway of the Eastern Roman Empire, later also known as Byzantium. A watershed in the history of Byzantium was the legislation of the Emperor Justinian in the 6th century: under his reign, a codification of Roman law was achieved, which was to remain not only the bedrock of Byzantine law, but which was also, after its rediscovery in Italy in the 11th century, to become the foundation of the continental European legal tradition. During the 10th, 11th and 12th centuries the Byzantine Emperors issued privilege acts to the Italian city-republics of Venice, Pisa and Genoa. This doctoral thesis attempts to examine these Byzantine imperial acts from a legal perspective: What is the legal information that these acts provide? What law do they presuppose and apply? Did both parties have law in common and if so, of what does it consist? Is Roman law assumed to be binding in these acts as part of that common law, and if so, in which cases and what are the examples given? Investigating the possible genesis of a common legal understanding in Europe already before the 11th century may contribute to an explanation of why Justinian s law became prominent in the West. In the last chapter, common legal issues in these acts, such as grants of immovable property, issues dealing with justice, shipwreck and salvage provisions, have been subjected to a comparative analysis and in their turn compared with other Byzantine or Western sources. The study of legal acts of the medieval period at a European level may help us to answer the question whether, long before the formation of today s Europe, it was already bound by common legal forms. This study attempts to place a small piece of the puzzle of how a common European legal heritage was formed

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Spend 30 and get Norton 360 21.0 - 3 Computers, 1 Year 2014 for 24.99. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Product details

  • Paperback: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Eleven International Publishing; Mul edition (30 Sep 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9490947776
  • ISBN-13: 978-9490947774
  • Product Dimensions: 17.1 x 23.5 cm
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,354,635 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

From the Inside Flap

For some 1000 years, the South-Eastern part of Europe was under the sway of the Eastern Roman Empire, later also known as Byzantium. A watershed in the history of Byzantium was the legislation of the Emperor Justinian in the 6th century: under his reign, a codification of Roman law was achieved, which was to remain not only the bedrock of Byzantine law, but which was also, after its rediscovery in Italy in the 11th century, to become the foundation of the continental European Legal tradition. During the 10th, 11th and 12th centuries the Byzantine Emperors issued privilege acts to the Italian city-republics of Venice, Pisa and Genoa. This book attempts to examine these Byzantine imperial acts from a legal perspective: What is the legal information that these acts provide? What law do they presuppose and apply? Did both parties have law in common and if so, of what does it consist? Is Roman law assumed to be binding in these acts as part of that common law, and if so, in which cases and what are the examples given? Investigating the possible genesis of a common Legal under-standing in Europe already before the 11th century may contribute to an explanation of why Justinian's law became prominent in the West. In the last chapter, common legal issues in these acts, such as grants of immovable property, issues dealing with justice, shipwreck and salvage provisions, have been subjected to a comparative analysis and in their turn compared with other Byzantine or Western sources. The study of legal acts of the medieval period at a European level may help us to answer the question whether, long before the formation of today's Europe, it was already bound by common legal forms. This study attempts to place a small piece of the puzzle of how a common European legal heritage was formed.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback