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But Why?: Teacher's Manual: Developing Philosophical Thinking in the Classroom Paperback – 25 Oct 2004


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Product details

  • Paperback: 175 pages
  • Publisher: Network Educational Press Ltd; Tch edition (25 Oct 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1855391724
  • ISBN-13: 978-1855391727
  • Product Dimensions: 21.2 x 1.1 x 30.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 209,198 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Teaching philosophy... has a very positive impact on children's work across the curriculum, giving them confidence to speak and discuss ideas to a high level.--Sanford Lakoff

From the Inside Flap

The perfect introduction to philosophy for children (P4C), But Why? Provides everything you need to introduce philosophy into your classroom. And for those who are already doing P4C, it will provide a welcome source of fresh inspiration and new ideas.

Why do philosophy in school?
This work clearly has a very positive impact on children’s work across the curriculum, giving them the confidence to speak and discuss ideas to a high level. – Ofsted report

P4C has far-reaching benefits that touch all parts of the curriculum and every aspect of school life by:
creating a climate for learning
increasing motivation
developing communication skills
boosting creativity and imagination
teaching moral citizenship
developing confidence, self-esteem and emotional identification.

Why But Why?
But Why? offers a tried-and-tested approach that uses the character of Philosophy Bear to make philosophy accessible to even the very youngest children.

The manual is a highly practical guide that includes:
how to run a successful P4C session
using stories and other stimuli for P4C
strategies that will lead to fruitful thinking
inspiring case studies and examples
a bank of games and activities
integrating philosophy into the school
involving parents.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 51 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 May 2005
"But Why?" is a highly practical resource that gives a clear outline of how to start doing Philosophy for Children(P4C) in the Primary classroom. The author, Sara Stanley, is a full-time teacher, and this shows in the numerous practice-based examples and the obvious understanding of how a creative and successful Primary classroom works. The book is clearly laid out with plenty of activities that can be encorporated into the curriculum to encourage deep thinking.
The book is inspiring, intelligent and practical. It is an essential read for those teachers and parents who are interested in encouraging young children to think about the 'Big Questions'. The author shows readers how children as young as 4 years can imagine, discuss and reason in a creative, challenging and fun way. One of the few educational books that you don't just flick though and put down!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By I love my shed on 8 Jan 2013
The philosophy bear concept is quite good, enabling kids to grow in confidence in their thinking. And the practical advice is ok. Some of it is clearly from an experience of teaching, so I'm sure it works well. It's well written and well structured.

The problem however is the ideas that the authors supply from themselves. They can't seem to help themselves not to include their bias. I'm a practicing philosopher, teaching at University, Undergrad and Grad level, and also a parent of two kids.

I was utterly dismayed to find that relativism/cynicism is explicitly encouraged by philosophy bear, "Big questions are ones that have no absolute right or wrong answers." (p. 85), or under 'What is your child learning?', "Because there are no definite right and wrong answers, philosophy will challenge their thinking..." (p. 95)

This interjection (by the authors through the character of Philosophy Bear) isn't true. 'Big Questions' are not defined by being unanswerable, instead they just questions that are defined more by being philosophical in nature. E.G. What is it to be human? Where did the universe come from? And some questions do have absolutely right and wrong answers. E.G. Is it ok to rape people? Does any reality exist? Does science work? (It isn't right to rape, reality does exist, and science does work!)

The majority view in Western academic philosophical enquiry is not relativism or subjectivism, as the authors might lead your child to believe but critical realism - there is a real world and we can know it, if we approach it carefully. One of the main things that many philosophers work hard on in the first year of an undergraduate course in philosophy is to help students to see that relativism is clearly false.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Miss Doubtfire on 20 May 2011
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Excellent 'starter pack' for P4C, full of useful ideas for planning and running sessions and practical ideas for activities across the Primary range, wish I'd found it sooner.
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Although I have yet to use this book within my own practice, I have seen it being used to great effect in others to develop children's thinking skills. Have put it to one side as an invaluable resource!
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By S. Dinkelmann on 30 Mar 2010
Great book to understand what philosophy is all about and ideas to encourage young children to become phiolosophical thinkers.
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