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Business Intelligence for the Enterprise (IBM DB2 Certification Guides) [Paperback]

Mike Biere
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
RRP: 28.99
Price: 28.73 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

4 Jun 2003 0131413031 978-0131413030 1

The Business Intelligence space is one fraught with vendors, tools, and opinions of how best to implement BI solutions. This book addresses key areas of BI such as data structure and delivery, tools evaluation, and more. The subject areas are presented from the author's point of view and experiences. At the heart of the materials are points to ponder, food for thought, and significant errors to avoid. Business Intelligence is the conscious, methodical transformation of data from any and all data sources into new forms to provide information that is business driven and results oriented. It will often encompass a mixture of tools, databases, vendors in order to deliver an infrastructure that not only will deliver the initial solution, but it will incorporate the ability to change with the business and current marketplace. The purpose of investing in BI is to transform from an environment that is reactive to data to one that is proactive. A major goal of the solution will be to automate and integrate as many steps and functions as possible. Another goal is to provide data analytics that are as tool independent as possible.


Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: IBM Press; 1 edition (4 Jun 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0131413031
  • ISBN-13: 978-0131413030
  • Product Dimensions: 1.7 x 18.1 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,427,055 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

From the Back Cover

Making business intelligence work: Start-to-finish guidance for managers

This book offers a true enterprise view of business intelligence. IBM expert Mike Biere shows managers how to create a coherent BI plan that reflects the needs of users throughout the organization-and then implement that plan successfully. Biere explains how to objectively assess the business case for BI, and identifies proven solutions for the obstacles that lead many BI projects to fail. Coverage includes:

  • Setting appropriate expectations and goals for your BI project
  • Understanding how the key components of a complete BI solution fit together
  • Designing effective BI solutions-including content management, handling unstructured data, and end-user segmentation
  • Providing effective support for BI end users
  • Introducing Corporate Performance Management (CPM): an executive's view of BI
  • Previewing tomorrow's "next wave" in BI solutions
  • Comprehensive checklists for planning your BI project

About the Author

MIKE BIERE is Worldwide Sales Specialist for Business Intelligence Analytics Tools for IBM Corporation. He has more than 20 years' experience in business intelligence-related technologies, working in every stage of the BI project lifecycle, and in every role from sales and marketing to product development and technical support.


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
Format:Paperback
The author is an IBM veteran who spent more than 20 years in the sales and product support divisions, except for a short period in a company specialized in Data Warehousing, so he naturally puts in this book a lot of his experiences and he also describes the history of BI in terms of architectures and technologies.

I had the impression that the target audience is mainly made by managers involved in BI projects, on either sides (vendors, consulting companies, customers).

One obvious comment from an Italian like me is that, like with many other books written in the US, the average size of the projects described in this book is rather large compared to what we are used to, and could only be applied to a handful of companies here in Italy.

The best feature of the book is the large number of real life examples that it contains. This can be a real help for a manager of a company who doesn't know the risks connected with BI projects and wants to learn from the many (and sometimes very costly) errors made by other people and companies in similar situations.

Under this aspect the book contains a lot of common sense and is a good reading, but don't look in it for innovative contents or for clear explanations of key technologies, buzzwords and project methodologies.

In most cases the book is limited to describe different situations (usually problematic), and to give some advise, without really delving into technical details.

Often I saw the author asking himself several questions about the typical problems that are encountered in a BI project, but then I couldn't find the answers.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For once -- a business book about technology and a MUST READ 27 Jun 2003
By "tji-boston" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
......
If you:
- are tired of the increasingly unintelligible hype around corporate IT
- need to get your feet on the ground about how to apply IT for creating business value
- want to understand business intelligence for what it can really do for your organization (as opposed to what the product vendors tell you)
then read this book.
I've been in the software industry for twenty years, and this is one of those rare, honest books that speaks from long experience and with a welcome disregard for technical faddism and ivory tower theory.
This book is needed because the idea of "information at your fingertips" at most companies is still just that: only an idea. Instead, most organizations still operate inefficiently and clumsily from "islands" of information scattered about in everything from spreadsheets to CRM systems to mainframe COBOL programs whose authors have long since retired.
Even companies that have spents millions of dollars to correct this state of affairs have failed. Why?
This book is about making information available across the board, why you would want to, and how to give your technology of choice "traction" and an impact on the bottom line.
This is done from two perspectives: the technical and the human side.
The author is refreshingly frank in describing corporate IT disasters, and does an excellent job of exposing the human side of where they go wrong down in the trenches. Anyone who has been anywhere near an overbudget, underperforming, or ultimately worthless IT project (this should include most people in corporate IT by now) will read with a smile of recognition. Others should read before you spend: there is a lot of money and heartache to be saved. By demonstrating in everyday language that the hardest part to manage is human expectations, Biere performs a real service to the industry that is usually neglected, and gives managers, end users, and even vendors much insight on where to be proactive.
But this is not a collection of anecdotes. CIOs, CEOs, IT professionals, and beginners will gain a lot from the industry retrospectives, overviews of categories of tools, and the workbook approach for grasping the human side and the technical side at once. The author provides thinking and homework that MUST be done before even considering an expenditure, and asks the questions that even the most expensive consultants won't ask for you.
Because the author is with IBM, you might expect the book to promote IBM products. Not so. Mr. Biere manages to name almost no products, and yet covers the tools available comprehensively.
And college computer science professors: put this book in your curricula -- give your students a healthy dose of the "real world" before sending them out into it.
Well done, Biere.
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thoughtful and thought-provoking book about BI ... 10 July 2003
By Richard Sawa - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The tji-Boston reviewer is dead-on correct that this is a frank discussion about BI. Biere will help you to think about BI, and he will help you to think clearly.
Business Intelligence for the Enterprise is written for the customer. The author is a sales guy, who works for a vendor (IBM - Good Grief!), AND he has written a book for the customer. Why?
He is obviously interested in seeing Enterprise BI succeed.
This book will help you think through sales hype, and move closer to success. In a certain sense, it is a book written to help business people like you deal with sales people like Mike Biere. Ironic? Yes. And no.
A perspective like this doesn't come from being slick and clever (goodness knows there is an endless array of slick and clever sales people.) Rather, it comes from making a mature commitment to one's working life, which Biere has obviously done.
It is as important for the C-level IT professionals to read as it is for their C-level bosses and colleagues. Needless(?) to say it is also an important read for those who are going to do the actual work of implementing the BI strategy.
Read this book, but only if you are willing to spend some time thinking....
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good for managers, too generic to be used by DW developers 26 Mar 2005
By Andrea Vincenzi - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The author is an IBM veteran who spent more than 20 years in the sales and product support divisions, except for a short period in a company specialized in Data Warehousing, so he naturally puts in this book a lot of his experiences and he also describes the history of BI in terms of architectures and technologies.

I had the impression that the target audience is mainly made by managers involved in BI projects, on either sides (vendors, consulting companies, customers).

One obvious comment from an Italian like me is that, like with many other books written in the US, the average size of the projects described in this book is rather large compared to what we are used to, and could only be applied to a handful of companies here in Italy.

The best feature of the book is the large number of real life examples that it contains. This can be a real help for a manager of a company who doesn't know the risks connected with BI projects and wants to learn from the many (and sometimes very costly) errors made by other people and companies in similar situations.

Under this aspect the book contains a lot of common sense and is a good reading, but don't look in it for innovative contents or for clear explanations of key technologies, buzzwords and project methodologies.

In most cases the book is limited to describe different situations (usually problematic), and to give some advise, without really delving into technical details.

Often I saw the author asking himself several questions about the typical problems that are encountered in a BI project, but then I couldn't find the answers.

Although there are no references to specific products, in more than one occasion it seems that the fact that the author comes from IBM comes to the surface, like when he prefers the "single provider" approach versus the "best of breed" (Chap. 4), or when he talks about the qualities of the mainframe as opposed to distributed environments (chap 7).

In conclusion, is this book worth reading? I have to say that whenever I read a book about BI and Data Warehousing I can't avoid comparing it with the books from Mr Kimball, which I consider the absolute reference in the field. This might not be fair, but it makes sense, since our time is limited, to read only those books that add something new to what we already know.

In this case the answer is yes, but only for a specific target, i.e. managers of companies who are about to start their first BI project. The rest of the project team would probably find most of the information in this book not very useful.
3.0 out of 5 stars not quite the mark of today 8 May 2008
By F. Mifflin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book has issues.

1. Some items discussed are really dated. It should be updated with newer BI strategies, and cover more dashboard and WEB 2.0 technologies.
2. The author is very knowledgeable and lays out complex topics in easy to understand parts, so it is even more important to allow for an update.
3. Being used as textbook as it was in a course in BI recently, there should be more examples and online source material available.
4. More Agile development should be included.
5. Again, the book has huge potential and only falls short in a few places, but does a great job in covering the complexity of BI in easy to understand ways. I would consider this a great book for reference and should be included in any BI library or resource lists.
5.0 out of 5 stars Useful because it's non-technical 19 Feb 2006
By Ted Pin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I think most IT people would agree that technology efforts, especially those in the area of BI, are first and foremost people efforts. This book focuses on the cultural and social aspects of BI, which are the bedrock for starting and finishing a perpetually useful initiative. This is highly recommended reading for anyone, regardless of experience, who wonders how so many BI projects can fail, and how to help make their own projects succeed.
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