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Burying Caesar : " Churchill, Chamberlain And The Battle For The Tory Party " : Paperback – 18 Apr 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 533 pages
  • Publisher: Phoenix; New Edition edition (18 April 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0753810603
  • ISBN-13: 978-0753810606
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 3.4 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 512,997 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

For despairing students of the Conservative Party's recent troubled history--from Margaret Thatcher's downfall to the civil strife of the Major years--this sizeable book will come as both salutary reminder and, perhaps, some kind of solace. Because one of its central inferences is that the commanding heights of the Conservative Party have long been a scene of vicious internecine struggle, not least in the crucial years 1929-1939, when Neville Chamberlain went head to head for the leadership, and then the premiership, with Winston Churchill.

The narrative divides naturally into two parts; indeed as the author admits his book is almost two volumes in one. The first section exhaustively details how Neville Chamberlain slipped into high office despite the junking of his brother Austen as Tory leader; it simultaneously outlines the backbench machinations of a consequently aggrieved and resentful Churchill. The second part of the book tells the better-known tale: of how, in the face of expansionist Nazi Germany, Churchill's robust policy of rearmament came to be preferred to Chamberlain's well- meaning but fatal "appeasement". Together the two sections of Burying Caesar make for a useful, enlightening, sometimes gripping saga that should more than satisfy the most gluttonous of political history buffs. --Sean Thomas --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

Burying Caesar is a work of great authority and verve - the highly acclaimed debut of a talented young historian

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 July 1999
Format: Hardcover
- look no further! This is one of the more interesting books on British politics I have read. It has changed my view on Chamberlain, who comes out as a much stronger figure than historians normally portray - many writers who are keen on Churchill (as the author clearly is) tend to paint Chamberlain as a two dimensional cartoon character. And to generalise yet again, unlike most books on recent British political history this one is actually quite fun to read - there are some amusing anecdotes and withering asides which I hadnt come across before.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Hugh Claffey on 25 Jun. 2009
Format: Paperback
I know very little about British Governments of the 1920's and 30's. This book provides quite a run through the period, contrasting the career paths of Chamberlain and Churchill, the former on the up escalator, the latter down. That being said, Churchill is dealt with very sympathetically, and as we know ultimately becomes immortal.
What comes across is Churchill's sheer self-belief, allied to a constant hunt for any opportunity to get back into cabinet through the 1930's. This self-belief ultimately was of service to the nation in his absolute refusal to negotiate with Hitler in the darkest days of 1940, when, unbelievably France had collapsed and the British Army had had most of its equipment captured. The power of Stewarts description of the debates in the House of Commons really enliven this book. Just read this

" This is only the beginning of the reckoning. This is only the first sip, the first foretaste of a bitter cup which will be proffered to us year by year unless by a surprise recovery of moral health and martial vigour, we arise again and take our stand for freedom as in the olden time"

This is Churchill after Hitler turned his back on the lenient strictures of the Munich agreement. It bellows through history, doesn't it?

Or Duff Cooper's resignation speech following Munich

"one great power should not be allowed, in disregard of treaty obligations, of laws of nations and the decrees of morality, to dominate by brute force the Continent of Europe. For that principle we fought against Napoleon Buonaparte, and against Louis XIV of France and Phillip II of Spain.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 July 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book, despite it's academic subject, gives a gripping and exciting account of the relationship between Churchill and Chamberlain in the context of 1930s politics. Graham Stewart has an excellent literary style, and is obviously extremely knowledgeable on the subject. I would heartily recommend this to anyone with even a passing interest in politics, history or biography.
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