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Burnout (Minx Graphic Novels) Paperback – 11 Jun 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (11 Jun. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401215378
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401215378
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 0.9 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 84,183 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

"Donner's writing is nothing short of gorgeous." - Baltimore Sun

Rebecca Donner was born in Vancouver, Canada, and during childhood lived in such varied locales as Japan, Michigan, Virginia and California. She graduated high school at 16 and received degrees from the University of California at Berkeley and Columbia University.

Rebecca has worked in the fiction department at the New Yorker and has taught at Wesleyan University, Columbia University, Barnard College, and The New School. For four years she was Literary Director of the renowned KGB Bar Fiction Series in New York.

Her first novel, Sunset Terrace, was published in 2003 to critical acclaim.

A member of the National Book Critics Circle, Rebecca writes essays and criticism for Bookforum and other publications. She ventured into the world of comics in 2008, when DC Comics published her graphic novel, Burnout, a collaboration with the artist Inaki Miranda.

Product Description

Review

"* "Donner's writing is nothing short of gorgeous... This is a remarkable debut." - Baltimore Sun * "...a colorful, wonderfully realized first novel... Donner's finely observed portraits of the Sunset Terrace denizens show a rare gift." - Publisher's Weekly" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Rebecca Donner is a novelist and the former literary director of the renowned KGB Fiction Series, for whom she edited On The Rocks. Her book reviews and essays have appeared in Bookforum, The Believer, People Magazine, and Post Road. Inaki Miranda is an Argentinian-born artist who currently resides in Spain. His work includes Dorq, Judge Dredd, and The Chase. He has recently contributed a story to the bestselling series Fables. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is a story about abusive relationship, love, environmentalism and learning who you are and who you are willing to be. It is a coming of age story written as a graphic novel set in the Pacific Northwest. Danni and her mother moved to a small logging town after her father disappeared. They are getting by but her mother wants more. Soon they move in with her mother's boyfriend, who turns out to be an alcoholic. Her soon-to-be step brother is an angry young man named Haskell, who she has been crushing on in school. Danni is confused and feels alone. But she soon discovers that Haskell has a secret - he is an eco-terrorist and Danni soon finds herself helping him, but she must learn how far she is willing to go.

The story delves into dealing with the issues of growing up, mixed families and learning who you want to be. The MINX graphic novels all have female-centric leads. The stories deal with young women learning to believe in themselves and to stand up for themselves. They are great stories and this is an awesome one.
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A powerful coming of age story about a teenage girl, Danni, moved by her mother to a logging town, into the home of her mother's emotionally violent boyfriend and the bedroom of his son, Haskell. Haskell sneaks out at night and when Danni follows him she discovers his secret life as an environmental terrorist and falls in love.

Great storyline by Rebecca Donner and beautifully drawn artwork by Inaki Miranda who drew Fables for DC Vertigo

The series Burnout belongs to is called Minx. Created by DC the Minx label brings togther well written fabulously illustrated grapic novels about the lives of teenage girls as an alternative to superhero and boys own comics
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A strong and poignant graphic novel 30 Jun. 2008
By Bookreporter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The theme of itinerant mothers and the children they drag with them, willfully or not, runs through both Rebecca Donner's first novel, SUNSET TERRACE, and her new graphic novel, BURNOUT. The two works have more than that in common, with their exploration of the wondering minds of children whose restlessness leads to trouble and even the backdrop of restaurants and diners, where the mothers work. The books part ways there, however, and just as she did in her excellent debut, Donner crafts a hauntingly evocative story in BURNOUT.

The story's narrator is Danni, a teenage girl who moves to Elkridge, Oregon, with her mom, Wynona, after her father deserts them. They move in with Hank, owner of a local hunting lodge, and his teenage son, Haskell. Hank is a man with many demons: alcohol, violence, the inability to manage his own business and poor parenting skills top the list. Wynona's dependence on Hank and her refusal to see the damage she is doing to herself and to her daughter by staying with him are deftly written. Donner never plays a scene for pity or to toy with emotions, a welcome relief.

BURNOUT succeeds because it capitalizes on the strengths of its art form. We get to know the supporting characters, including Danni's best friend, a hard-rocking math whiz named Vivian, through effectively brief glimpses. Donner wisely avoids thought balloons for everyone, giving us Danni's innermost feelings only in the narration. Danni's initial repulsion toward Haskell soon gives way to a crush and an intense need to learn where he goes when he sneaks out each night, and herein lies the crux of this highly readable graphic novel's plot. How Danni gets pulled into a world she knows little about and learns that she is willing to do anything for the boy she loves --- even if it means sacrificing the most important friendship she has --- is an intense journey. Is Danni wiser than her mother, or is she doomed to repeat the same patterns?

Donner is brilliantly supported by the nuanced artwork of Inaki Miranda and the beautifully rendered shadings of Eva de la Cruz. Miranda has a knack for capturing fluid human movements and natural poses, giving BURNOUT a cinematic quality perfect for its tone. His sense of perspective and his constantly shifting angles and point of view flesh out the story without ever intruding on it.

With a character as flawed yet appealing as Danni as a guide, BURNOUT is a welcome journey through the psyche of women in love with the wrong kind of guy and the myriad ways people can convince themselves to do anything. Ultimately, BURNOUT is a nicely taut story of the perils of desire and how people trap themselves in situations they should have left long ago.

--- Reviewed by John Hogan
A Nicely Taut Story of the Perils of Desire 24 Nov. 2009
By GraphicNovelReporter.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The theme of itinerant mothers and the children they drag with them, willfully or not, runs through both Rebecca Donner's first novel, Sunset Terrace, and her new graphic novel, Burnout. The two works have more than that in common, with their exploration of the wondering minds of children whose restlessness leads to trouble and even the backdrop of restaurants and diners, where the mothers work. The two works part ways there, however, and just as she did in her excellent debut, Donner crafts a hauntingly evocative story in Burnout.

The story's narrator is Danni, a teenage girl who moves to Elkridge, Oregon, with her mom, Wynona, after her father deserts them. They move in with Hank, owner of a local hunting lodge, and his teenage son, Haskell. Hank is a man with many demons: alcohol, violence, the inability to manage his own business, and poor parenting skills top the list. Wynona's dependence on Hank and her refusal to see the damage she is doing to herself and to her daughter by staying with him are deftly written. Donner never plays a scene for pity or to toy with emotions, a welcome relief.

Burnout succeeds because it capitalizes on the strengths of its art form. We get to know the supporting characters, including Danni's best friend, a hard-rocking math whiz named Vivian, through effectively brief glimpses. Donner wisely avoids thought balloons for everyone, giving us Danni's innermost feelings only in the narration.

Danni's initial repulsion toward Haskell soon gives way to a crush and an intense need to learn where he goes when he sneaks out each night, and herein lies the crux of this highly readable graphic novel's plot. How Danni gets pulled into a world she knows little about and learns that she is willing to do anything for the boy she loves--even if it means sacrificing the most important friendship she has--is an intense journey. Is Danni wiser than her mother or is she doomed to repeat the same patterns?

Donner is brilliantly supported by the nuanced artwork of Inaki Miranda and the beautifully rendered shadings of Eva de la Cruz. Miranda has a knack for capturing fluid human movements and natural poses, giving Burnout a cinematic quality perfect for its tone. His sense of perspective and his constantly shifting angles and point of view flesh out the story without ever intruding on it.

With a character as flawed yet appealing as Danni as a guide, Burnout is a welcome journey through the psyche of women in love with the wrong kind of guy and the myriad ways people can convince themselves to do anything. Ultimately, Burnout is a nicely taut story of the perils of desire and the how people trap themselves in situations they should have left long ago.

-- John Hogan
Eco-terrorism 9 Nov. 2011
By Brittany Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
After her dad leaves, Danni's mother drags her up to Oregon. Here her mother falls in love with an alcoholic and they move in. The man has a son, Haskell, and Danni and him share a room. He is very secretive and sneaks out every night. One night Danni follows him and finds out that he is the elusive ecoterrorist that the town has been trying to catch. She can believe in his cause in the beginning, but soon enough it might get to be too intense for her. Danni will have to try and decide the difference of fighting for a cause and just plan fighting.

First let's talk about the ending. I cannot believe it. It is left completely open and we never get to find out what happened. GAH! I can't even stand it. The rest of the book was interesting. Never really had too much ecoterrorism in my area. We have trees, loads of them, but not too many loggers. Haskell has to be the most broody person alive. He has his hair all in his eyes, and dagger looks that kill. He sort of just cracked me up the whole time. I have to applaud Danni's mom in this novel. She was a good mom and eventually fell into how she should be. The dad was a jerk. It's really too bad, because sometimes people can't help it but you still hate them a bit. If you're a big fan of fighting for the environment you might want to check this out. There's some romance too, just in case spiking trees isn't enough for you ;)

First Line:
"Sometimes when I'm alone... ... I try to see how long I can stand it."

Favorite Line:
"That blaze would be beautiful if it wasn't so terrible."
Great graphic novel 2 Nov. 2008
By Chad Sosna - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Three stars might seem like an odd rating for something I call "Great," but in all fairness a good graphic novel is in a category to itself. It is not comparable to a non-graphic novel in which all the pictures must be created in the reader's head.

That said, BURNOUT is highly entertaining. It has intrigue from the start as you quickly identify with teenage Danni and her mother, moving to a new place. Her mother's hard-living boyfriend, Hank, and Hank's son Haskell all emerge as colorful characters. Danni discovers Haskell has a secret, and soon she's part of that secret--even though it might get her arrested.

Without giving spoilers, trust me that you will likely be pulled through this story in one setting, it's so interesting. Other readers here seemed to like the ending but I didn't. That is no reason to avoid the book, I just thought something more imaginative could have happened.

Though the story is adequately good, the art by Inaki Miranda is extraordinarily done for a graphic novel. He has a keen sense of framing each panel, and subtly uses lines and inking that provide true enhancement to the story.
Another great graphic novel in the MINX line 1 Sept. 2010
By Steven R. McEvoy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is a story about abusive relationship, love, environmentalism and learning who you are and who you are willing to be. It is a coming of age story written as a graphic novel set in the Pacific Northwest. Danni and her mother moved to a small logging town after her father disappeared. They are getting by but her mother wants more. Soon they move in with her mother's boyfriend, who turns out to be an alcoholic. Her soon-to-be step brother is an angry young man named Haskell, who she has been crushing on in school. Danni is confused and feels alone. But she soon discovers that Haskell has a secret - he is an eco-terrorist and Danni soon finds herself helping him, but she must learn how far she is willing to go.

The story delves into dealing with the issues of growing up, mixed families and learning who you want to be. The MINX graphic novels all have female-centric leads. The stories deal with young women learning to believe in themselves and to stand up for themselves. They are great stories and this is an awesome one.
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