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Bullet Point
 
 

Bullet Point [Kindle Edition]

Peter Abrahams
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Product Description

Product Description

Wyatt never really thought much about his dad—a hardened criminal, a lifer in a prison somewhere on the other side of the state. But then the economy had to go and tank, and the community had to go and cut the baseball program from Wyatt's high school. And then the coach had to go and show Wyatt a photograph of his dad at sixteen, looking very much like Wyatt himself. Through a series of unfortunate—or perhaps they were fortunate—events, Wyatt meets a crazy-hot girl named Greer with a criminal dad of her own. A criminal dad who is, in fact, in jail with Wyatt's own criminal dad. Greer arranges a meeting, and Wyatt's dad is nothing like the guy he's imagined—he's suave, and smart, and funny, and cool, and—Wyatt's pretty sure—innocent. So Wyatt decides to help him out. A decision that may possibly be the worst he's ever made in his life.

This is another hold-your-breath thriller by the New York Times bestselling and Edgar Award nominated Peter Abrahams.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 362 KB
  • Print Length: 308 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0061227692
  • Publisher: HarperTeen; 1 edition (27 April 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003GFIVUC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,454,700 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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4.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too 3 Jun 2010
By TeensReadToo TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Life for Wyatt and his friend, Dub, revolves around baseball. Well, it used to anyway. When the coach announces that baseball is being cut from the extracurricular schedule due to lack of funding, both boys are furious. Just when they are about to earn their spots in the varsity lineup, the program is yanked.

When Wyatt finds out there might be a way to play ball somewhere else, he jumps at the chance. Dub is going to live with his aunt in another more financially sound school district, and Wyatt is welcome to come along. Not only will he get a chance to play baseball, but he'll also be getting out of the house and away from his unpleasant step-dad, Rusty. Although he'll miss his mother and his little step-sister, he's all in favor of the move.

Just when it looks like his luck has changed, Wyatt learns that his new school only allows one transfer student on each athletic team per year. Dub's transfer was arranged first so he gets the spot. Wyatt's friend urges him to make the move anyway so he might have a chance to play next year.

The new school isn't bad and an added bonus is meeting a slightly older, quite attractive girl named Greer. She and Wyatt hit it off right away. It doesn't take long for Wyatt to discover an amazing coincidence. Greer's father is an inmate at the state correctional facility in the area, and he knows Wyatt's biological father, who is an inmate in the same prison. All Wyatt's ever been told is that just before he was born, his father and several acquaintances got the bright idea to rob a couple of drug dealers. There was gunfire exchanged when they broke into the house, killing a young woman and critically injuring her baby girl. Now, Wyatt is faced with a chance to meet the man he has only known by name and reputation.
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Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  16 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unexpected Surprise 27 May 2010
By J.Prather - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I went into this expecting a mystery; a pretty standard whodunnit. In fact, this book does not seem to be much of a mystery at all. It is a very good book though, no matter what category you put it in. In many ways, it's a coming of age tale for Wyatt, a 16 year old boy living in a town suffering from the effects of the economy. Wyatt lives for baseball, and when his school gets rid of it because of the budget, Wyatt moves to a nearby town for a fresh start and to get away from his abusive step-father.

It's after his move that Wyatt gets in contact with Sonny, his biological father, currently serving a life term in prison for murder. He also meets Greer, a girl with a shady past and her own set of father issues. It's then that Wyatt goes on a "quest" to determine if his father is really innocent, and if his girl friend is innocent as well. Wyatt's steadfast determination to view the world as black and white in the face of all the gray areas now confronting him formed the basis of his character and the main appeal of this book.

The author has told a good story here, pretty unique in YA fiction. His characters are 100 percent believable. He has created a sense of foreboding that runs throughout the book and it's that sense of dread as well as the compelling characters that keep the pages turning. There's no real action in the book until the very end, but the suspense runs deep. Read this book for the relationships - the dialogue between Wyatt and Greer is perfect. I won't speak to the ending except to say that even though I was expecting something drastic, I wasn't expecting that.

A warning to parents: this book is a good read for older teens and adults. There's quite a bit of sex and some language that will most likely not make this a good choice for younger teens or fans of this author's Echo Falls series. Wyatt is 16 in this book and his girlfriend is 19, so perhaps kind of illegal in some states?

A well written tale for the older teen crowd.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good start peters out 10 May 2010
By Rita Sydney - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I LOVE Peter Abrahams books. So I've resisted criticizing this one. But to judge Bullet Point as good as earlier works would do great injustice to them. (For example, the Echo Falls series which are wonderful.)

Bullet Point starts strong: a normal kid, Wyatt, almost 17, is thrown by circumstance into unfamiliar situations. As usual, Abrahams does a great job of capturing the relationships among people.

The plot suddenly speeds up when an "older" woman (19), who Wyatt meets by chance, occasions the putting of him in touch with his biological father who is serving a life sentence.

Was Wyatt's dad guilty of the crime he's accepted punishment for? The story moves along OK as Wyatt unravels what happened 17 years ago, before he was born.

Why I judge the book less than Abrahams best is twofold.

The real "bad guys" appear at the end without enough set up early in the plot.

Mr. Abrahams way of dealing with the separation of Wyatt from his "older" woman didn't make sense given the profiles he'd established for the characters.

For new readers of Abrahams, don't judge him by this book. He has many many other ones without the flaws I saw in this one.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Good Addiction Reviews 13 Jun 2010
By flamingo1325 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
A murder mystery set years after the suspect begins serving a life sentence, Bullet Point thrusts forth many questions and theories, engaging the reader early on. Wyatt has never known his biological father. In fact, until things start being churned up, Wyatt has rarely asked questions and doesn't even know which prison houses his lifer dad. Watching Wyatt face a series of unexpected and difficult situations, this book is a study in character development as much as it is a thrill ride. This is definitely a page turner, amping up the suspense.

Wyatt starts out as a strong main character, a mostly average teenage boy living in a town that's going nowhere. His main shining hope is baseball, particularly since his grades are nothing stunning. As the plot progresses, however, Wyatt's innate cleverness and reasoning skills become both evident and honed. He learns plenty of new things about himself and grows exponentially in both his maturity, his interactions with people and in the way he views the world around him. There is a very obvious shift in his overall frame of mine, pushing him from a high school kid to someone who has seen things others go through their entire lives without ever facing. The effect it has on him is striking and brought forth, leading to a very memorable ending.

Greer is snarky and independent, adding spark to both Wyatt's world and the plot itself. She is difficult to explain without giving too much away of the plot but she plays a central role in both Wyatt's personal development and that of the plot. She is a very memorable character even if moody, rapidly shifting in her reactions and emotions. With each new turn, Greer will spark conflicting and uncertain emotions in the reader, raising many questions and tugging them on the same inexplicable and tumultuous ride she takes Wyatt on. Three years older than Wyatt and out of high school, living on her own, Greer pulls Wyatt into a relationship that will leave the reader questioning its health and effect on him. At two separate points in their lives- and with two different pasts- they tear at each other and combat as much as they come together and care.

Though this book is written in third person, it stays central to Wyatt and the reader learns things as Wyatt does. The writing itself is unique; Abrahams has created a voice that I associated strongly with Wyatt despite the lack of immediate insight. If Wyatt were to write, this style is how I imagine it and that facet alone speaks a tremendous amount about Abraham's writing ability. I highly doubt another novel at the hand of this writer will follow this same dialect and trend.

Throughout, clues are given and leads are opened regarding the truth behind Sonny's possible innocence, engaging the reader further. I would develop a theory only to have more holes and questions be put in which also brings up another, more subtle aspect of this book- the idea behind "reasonable doubt." Abrahams has masterfully weaved a story which leaves the reader questioning in multiple ways if Sonny really should have been in prison or if he truly is one of the innocent men condemned to a life in prison. It isn't until the end of the book the reader can come to any decision on this yet Abrahams pitches it in a brilliant way that will still leave confusion and mixed emotions.

Once things with Sonny become involved in the story, the pace speeds up and things move quickly. From teenage detective work to visits during allotted hours with Sonny himself, Wyatt wades through an entirely foreign world to him while trying to learn what he can, figure out his conflicted feelings on multiple things, and get to know the man who helped bring him into this world whom he has never known. Overall, Abrahams doesn't mess around with his writing. Things are straight to the point with little filler. Once a decision is made, within a paragraph or two things are dealing right with that- no in between, wasting time with this book which helped add to the overall effect of who Wyatt was and how his mind worked.

Overall, this is a fantastic take on the murder mystery style as the same burning curiosity that would be present whether this was written right after the actual crime or years later is ignited. With strong characters, fluent and stylistic writing, and numerous shocking twists, Abrahams has certainly created a hit with this one. All these events lead up to a very shocking ending that leaves the reader thinking not only about the outcome but the underlying implications and potentially even some transference into their own lives.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too 3 Jun 2010
By TeensReadToo - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Life for Wyatt and his friend, Dub, revolves around baseball. Well, it used to anyway. When the coach announces that baseball is being cut from the extracurricular schedule due to lack of funding, both boys are furious. Just when they are about to earn their spots in the varsity lineup, the program is yanked.

When Wyatt finds out there might be a way to play ball somewhere else, he jumps at the chance. Dub is going to live with his aunt in another more financially sound school district, and Wyatt is welcome to come along. Not only will he get a chance to play baseball, but he'll also be getting out of the house and away from his unpleasant step-dad, Rusty. Although he'll miss his mother and his little step-sister, he's all in favor of the move.

Just when it looks like his luck has changed, Wyatt learns that his new school only allows one transfer student on each athletic team per year. Dub's transfer was arranged first so he gets the spot. Wyatt's friend urges him to make the move anyway so he might have a chance to play next year.

The new school isn't bad and an added bonus is meeting a slightly older, quite attractive girl named Greer. She and Wyatt hit it off right away. It doesn't take long for Wyatt to discover an amazing coincidence. Greer's father is an inmate at the state correctional facility in the area, and he knows Wyatt's biological father, who is an inmate in the same prison. All Wyatt's ever been told is that just before he was born, his father and several acquaintances got the bright idea to rob a couple of drug dealers. There was gunfire exchanged when they broke into the house, killing a young woman and critically injuring her baby girl. Now, Wyatt is faced with a chance to meet the man he has only known by name and reputation.

The story quickly becomes an investigation in which Wyatt struggles to learn more about the man he has spent most of his life trying to forget. As his contact with his father increases, so does his desire to find out the whole story and maybe even find out if he is really an innocent man.

Author Peter Abrahams' talent as a writer of mystery and suspense makes BULLET POINT a sure winner. Readers will be intrigued by the plot's twists and turns right up until the very end. Wyatt's character is likable and inspiring as he experiences separation from his mother and step-sister, frustration with his step-father, his first love, and the need to know his biological father's true story.

Reviewed by: Sally Kruger, aka "Readingjunky"
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Life is an Anagram 10 May 2010
By Kevin Killian - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
In Bullet Point, Peter Abrahams returns to the world of the lonely and alienated teen boy he knows so well. Last year's Reality Check showed the boy plunged out of his element into a rich kids' school and the wealthy horsey set. No such luck attends Wyatt Lathem, whose life seems mired down in our terrible economy of today, stuck in a town without any hope of recovery. His only pleasure is the school baseball team and then one day, all "extracurricular" activities are wiped off the slate by decree of the school board.

At the same time Wyatt is having problems at home with a borderline abusive stepfather, Rusty, who doesn't mind using his fists to get his own way. Rusty, too, has been laid off, and sits around the house all day watching TV and downing the beers.

Wyatt's solution is to establish residency in a town some two hundred miles away at the other end of the state (it's not named, but it must be somewhere like Colorado?) where the high school baseball program still has funding. As it happens, this town is adjacent to the prison where Wyatt's biological dad has been locked up since before our boy was born. One thing leads to another and soon Wyatt, coincidentally reading Shakespeare's Hamlet in his English class, has come to suspect that perhaps his father, Sonny Racine, was railroaded for a crime he did not commit.

With the help of a local girl Greer Torrance, like himself the child of a prisoner, Wyatt starts turning over every rock in a three city radius, and there's a heckuva lot of slimy life under them rocks. Abrahams paints the grim realities of an economic downturn with a master's touch. The story has its twists and turns, and he turns up the heat of the sex action way hot. Would you call it statutory rape in your community? Maybe that's why Abrahams is vague about what state cougar Greer lives in. If the novel isn't up to the heights of previous suspense novels by the author, he is trying something new and you got to give him applause for that,
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