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  • Bullet for the General [Blu-ray] [1967] [US Import]
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Bullet for the General [Blu-ray] [1967] [US Import]

48 customer reviews

Price: £8.24
Only 3 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.
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£8.24 Only 3 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.

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Bullet for the General [Blu-ray] [1967] [US Import] + Companeros [Blu-ray] [1970] [US Import] + Mercenario - Der Gefürchtete (BR) DE-Version
Price For All Three: £37.51

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Product details

  • Language: English, Italian
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Region: All Regions (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Classification: U
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B007ATHNRW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 52,214 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Spike Owen TOP 500 REVIEWER on 6 Jun. 2013
Format: DVD
Breakheart Pass is directed by Tom Gries and adapted to screenplay by Alistair MacLean from his own novel. It stars Charles Bronson, Ben Johnson, Richard Crenna, Jill Ireland, Charles Durning and Ed Lauter. Music is by Jerry Goldsmith and cinematography by Lucien Ballard.

A train apparently loaded with medical supplies is heading through the mountains towards plagued Fort Humboldt. On board is a small U.S. Army unit and an assortment of passengers, all of whom are about to be in the middle of murder, mystery and dastardly plotting.

Not exactly loved by the critics of the time, but liked well enough by the paying public, Breakheart Pass is a thoroughly enjoyable movie. True enough to say it's a blend of Murder On The Orient Express and Ten Little Indians, only with a gorgeous Western backdrop, but so what? Just exactly what is wrong with that anyway? The plot is a little too tricky for its own good and characterisations are not rich in detail, but there's so much else to enjoy regardless.

It's a fine cast playing a number of desperate/cunning/dubious characters, with Bronson leading from the front at a time when he was hot at the box office. The reasoning behind all the murders, as passengers start getting bumped off one by one, keeps the mystery element strong, while Gries (Will Penny) directs without fuss and filler. The action sequences are impressive (the train roof fight is as great as you have heard it is), with stunt coordinator Yakima Canutt (in his final assignment) once again excelling.

Elsewhere, Jerry Goldsmith's score is wonderfully robust and chest thumping, a real triumph from the great man. Ballard (also Will Penny/The Wild Bunch) beautifully captures the snowbound Lewiston locale whilst ensuring the gorgeous Camas Prairie Railroad is a must see for locomotive enthusiasts. All told it's a very entertaining hybrid picture that is well constructed, technically smart and pulsing with good honest intentions. 7/10
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 4 July 2012
Format: Blu-ray
Following the unlikely alliance of an opportunistic American (Lou Castel) and a Mexican bandit (Gian Maria Volonte) who sells arms to the rebels, the first half hour or so of Damiano Damiani's cult classic is more than a bit ropey. The director has difficulty establishing the relationship between the two leads and resorts to a succession of shoot-em-ups. Thankfully, these are better handled than the drawn out opening attack on the train carrying Castel's enigmatic gringo, in which too many of the ideas are in the script and too few in the execution.

If the first half is the usual running with the rebels territory, the film becomes more complex as it progresses. It is clear from the beginning that the gringo is working to his own agenda, and throughout the course of the film he steers the group towards it. Not interested in women, he professes to be interested only in money, yet at one point kills a rebel paymaster and throws away his cash. Yet even after his objective and the bandito's part in it become clear, the film manages to take the characters even further in an intriguing epilogue.

Both may be mercenary, but finally choose their own executioners, although in very different ways. Castel inadvertently because, despite ruthlessly killing those on both sides to achieve his end, he is ultimately not ruthless enough, Volonte voluntarily, passing judgement on himself when he realises the consequences of his actions.

Castel is a fairly anonymous lead as the 'ugly American', a potential flaw which the director manages to turn to the film's advantage. A moral void, he has no ideals and no scruples but is instead a remorseless pragmatist.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 12 Dec. 2007
Format: DVD
For some inane reason, Amazon have bundled the reviews for Bullet for the General with the reviews for the not even remotely similar Breakheart Pass. Since bboth are four-star movies, I've combined the reviews for both, but please bear in mind these films are released separately by different distributors and are not released as a double-bill.

BREAKHEART PASS REVIEW

Anyone who's ever had to slog through his soul-destroying ITC or Cannon-years output will find it hard to imagine that there was ever a time when Charles Bronson was a half-decent actor who not only made films that were actually released in cinemas, but good ones at that. Breakheart Pass is probably the best of the last burst of quality output in the actor's oeuvre that also saw The Streetfighter (aka Hard Times) and the whimsical From Noon Till Three; for that matter, the last good Alistair MacLean screen outing before what seems like an eternity of formulaic made-for-TV efforts with C-list casts.

The plot has all the MacLean staples - sabotage, secret identities, wolves in sheep's clothing and a plot where no-one and nothing is what they appear to be. The only novelty is the location, a train rushing through the old West to bring medical supplies to a cholera-infected fort through strikingly snowbound mountain countryside beautifully captured through cinematographer Lucien Ballard's lens. But the fact that so much of the film is simply one of the author's beloved WW2 plots with outlaws and Indians instead of Nazis doesn't matter: it's the telling that counts, and with a tight script and strong direction from Tom Gries that is equally adept at the mystery (more a 'what the heck's going on?' than 'who's behind it all?
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