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Buddhist Cosmology: Philosophy and Origins Paperback – Feb 1997


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Paperback, Feb 1997
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Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Kosei Publishing Co (Feb. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 4333016827
  • ISBN-13: 978-4333016822
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 2.3 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,223,345 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Phil McCracken on 19 Feb. 2012
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This is probably one of the best books on Science and Religion that I have ever read.

The book is very frank and honest about how Buddhism imagines the Universe to be and the diagrams are excellent. Although the author is a Buddhist, he has a remarkably open minded approach to his subject.

Some Christians and Muslims often try and distort the words of their scriptures in an attempt to try and find modern science in the text. This book does not do this and the author freely admits that Buddhist Cosmology is demonstrably wrong.

The most impressive thing about this book for me was the amazing mythological cosmology that it describes. The distances and timescales are mind blowing.

The cosmology in the book is based upon two Buddhist manuscripts written several centuries after Buddha's death and so it is unclear how much of this Buddha himself believed.

Overall, I was very impressed with this book and I would gladly recommend it, especially to anyone interested in Indian or Eastern Religions.
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By kristine sykes on 11 Jan. 2014
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it wasnt for me brought for a friend must be agood book recomended apostive book.i havent read it yet cool
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Detailed, to say the least 5 Dec. 1999
By Sean Hoade - Published on Amazon.com
The author does an excellent job of making clear what the ancient Buddhists thought about the structure of the universe. The only lack the book really has is that of perspective, leaving one to wonder what this has to say about modern Buddhism in the face of cosmological advances, but the author makes up for this in the book's masterful final chapter.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A unique and detailed handbook with a ton of info! 19 Feb. 2009
By Ted Biringer - Published on Amazon.com
5.0 out of 5 stars A unique and detailed handbook with a ton of info!, August 28, 2008

Anyone interested in an reference book that provides an extensive overview of Buddhist Cosmology need look no further!

Beginning with an overview of the pre-Buddhist landscape of India, this book explores, and details how the "universe" of Buddhism arose, and developed throughout the history of Buddhism. With a plethora of illustrations, diagrams and photos, the whole variety of Buddhist Cosmology is offered at the turn of a page.

This book, presents, defines, and explains the development of a wide variety of Buddhist universal elements including heavens and hells, Bodhisattvas, Buddhas, Devas. The various "worlds" and "realms" of Buddhism, along with its beings-sentient and insentient-are described and explained in one coherent and accssible volume.

Great Job!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A unique and detailed handbook with a ton of info! 29 Aug. 2008
By Ted Biringer - Published on Amazon.com
Anyone interested in an reference book that provides an extensive overview of Buddhist Cosmology need look no further!

Beginning with an overview of the pre-Buddhist landscape of India, this book explores, and details how the "universe" of Buddhism arose, and developed throughout the history of Buddhism. With a plethora of illustrations, diagrams and photos, the whole variety of Buddhist Cosmology is offered at the turn of a page.

This book, presents, defines, and explains the development of a wide variety of Buddhist universal elements including heavens and hells, Bodhisattvas, Buddhas, Devas. The various "worlds" and "realms" of Buddhism, along with its beings--sentient and insentient--are described and explained in one coherent and accssible volume.

Great Job!
Exactly What I Needed 16 Dec. 2013
By me - Published on Amazon.com
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If you read Western literature, you need some background in Shakespeare and the Bible. If you read Asian literature (or indulge in lighter entertainments like Kung Fu movies, Jin Yong novels, or Japanese anime), you need some background in Asian cosmologies. Buddhist Cosmology is well-organized, concise, and provides the reader with what they need to know to navigate around the Asian imagination. I originally found this book at the library, and after checking it out repeatedly, I realized it was a valuable reference that I should buy. Highly recommended.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
not what I was looking for 14 April 2011
By M. Scott - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
The author indeed provides a lot of info about ancient Buddhist cosmological models. There isn't a whole lot on the "philosophy" part though - the author provides a lot of details but not much on why I should be interested in them. I was hoping this book would elucidate some deeper meanings in these models, but again and again you're just presented a bunch of facts presented rather indifferently, almost getting a sense that the author himself finds the material boring and uninspiring. If you're simply looking for reference material on Buddhist cosmogonies and/or are interested in them simply for their own sake, I'd say this is would be a good purchase for you.
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