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Bruckner: Symphony No.8
 
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Bruckner: Symphony No.8

16 Oct 2000 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
15:10
2
13:44
3
24:52
4
22:25


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 July 2005
  • Release Date: 1 July 2005
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: (C) 2000 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:16:11
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003Y6TRZQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 108,452 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By mike the wizard on 4 Aug 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is one of those rare recordings - in this instance live at St Florian - where the spirit of Bruckner seems to have risen from the dead and caught hold of Boulez and the Vienna Philharmonic. The translucency of the woodwind and string textures does not short-change the glory of the brass at climaxes and the score unfolds with a logic and flow which is deeply engrossing. Perhaps the sense of architecture in the music-making reflects the unique setting. This is a musical experience in which you only have to submit and let this masterly symphony wash over you. Whether you respond to the dimension of the spiritual or not, you will find yourself in the presence of something quite special here. Don't miss it.
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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful By dvimus on 1 Nov 2000
Format: Audio CD
The days are gone when recordings of Bruckner's Eighth Symphony were a rarity, but despite that great recordings have remained elusive. Haitink was too dour and the normally relaiable Gunter Wand got into quite a mess on his RCA recording. Karajan's mid 70's version was probably the only reliable choice and his tended towards the rhetorical. Not so with this new Boulez recording. Every detail is carefully thought out but never do you feel Boulez gets in the way of the music. Unlike almost all other recordings, the double-dotted rhythm of the first movement is correct and played naturally. Boulez resists the temptation to overstate the conclusion of the short first movement, realising there is still much further to go, placing the emphasis instead on the third movement and the finale which is surely what Bruckner intended. The third movement with that yearning melody in D flat is here played with such poingency and feeling that you immediately sense this is where Bruckner intended the heart of his greatest symphony.
Boulez's judging of tempos of each movement is exceptional throughout, broadening out at the big climaxes and pushing the tempo in the build ups. Never is there a feeling the music has lost direction, the big problem with Guilini, also on DG. The Vienna Philharmonic know this work possibly better than any other orchestra and here they play it with an intensity that they lack for Guilini. Boulez is prepared to honour Bruckner's dynamics to the letter, avoiding the temptation of others, including Haitink, to 'edit' the big brass tuttis. In this performance they shine out in their full glory. The strings have that famous polish of the VPO and the quality of their tone will rank alongside the finest work they have committed to disk.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Classical Musician on 25 July 2011
Format: Audio CD
If you think the names Boulez and Bruckner couldn't possibly co-exist within the same sentence, then I dare you to buy this recording and see for yourself. Too often have Boulez's forays into more conservative musical repertoire been labelled by such remarks as "the Ice Man cometh" or some other nonsense. Whilst it is true that Boulez's approach to this symphony isn't quite as apocalyptic, frenzied, monumental or zen-like as more familiar Bruckner conductors such as Giulini, Wand, Furtwangler, Karajan or Celibidache, there is still room for a more intelligent, refined and considered approach to this repertoire. After all, who in their right mind would want to constrict Bruckner performances to being only monumental and apocalyptic? Surely music lovers out there are intelligent enough to appreciate a myriad of interpretations, even in the seemingly hallowed ground of Bruckner's symphonies.

All I would say is that if you're only used to hearing Bruckner 'a la Karajan', Giulini or Wand, then give this one a go. You might be surprised and actually like the way that Boulez intreprets this piece, especially as it doesn't require the listener to set their internal metabolism at half speed in order to appreciate the grandeur of the writing (I wonder which conductor I'm thinking of here......!). Indeed, Boulez is very much at the opposite end to Celibidache, and if you're familiar with the latter's unique recording of Bruckner 8 with the Munich Philharmonic, then the Boulez recording will complement it perfectly.

In general the 1st, 2nd and 4th movements are taken at more flowing tempi than usual, with the result that the Scherzo doesn't sound like some kind of elephant trying to walk around in a pair of ballerina's shoes.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 1 Jan 2013
Format: Audio CD
The Iceman emerged from the gloom of his IRCAM bunker in Paris to deliver a first-rate Bruckner Eighth in 2000 - he followed it up with an equally compelling performance in 2005 in St Florians itself with the Vienna Philharmonic Bruckner: Symphony No.8 (Boulez) [DVD].

There is much to like about Boulez as a Brucknerian: he is patient and unfussy; his grip on the architecture is masterly; he illicits a lustrous response from the Vienna Philharmonic.

This performance is dogged by a systemic failure: one climax sounds like another. This is especially true of the first movement where the epic fortissimo before the Totenuhr sounds no different than its predecessors - it's like Pierre cannot quite shift from fourth gear into fifth. The same comment applies to the last movement: there is a monochromatism to the climaxes.

The mere mention of the word 'metaphysics' causes Boulez to reach for his well-thumbed copy of the Darmstadt Manifesto. It is somewhat unfair to decry this performances as being less spiritual than the Furtwangler or Karajan alternatives; it works well enough on its own terms.

You will not be shortchanged if you acquire this disc even if, on my part at least, there is no great hunger to hear Boulez in other works by Bruckner.
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