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Bruckner: Symphony No.7 [CD]

Daniel Barenboim Audio CD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: 9.26 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Biography

Daniel Barenboim, born in Buenos Aires in 1942, started piano lessons at the age of five and gave his first official concert in 1950. He made his debut as a pianist in Vienna and Rome in 1952. In 1954, he took part in Igor Markevitch’s conducting classes in Salzburg and played for Wilhelm Furtwängler, who described him as ‘a phenomenon’. In 1955 he studied with Nadia ... Read more in Amazon's Daniel Barenboim Store

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Product details

  • Audio CD (9 April 2012)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • ASIN: B0076IH1HE
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 15,936 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Bruckner: Symphony No.7 in E major - Ed. Nowak - 1. Allegro moderato20:512.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Bruckner: Symphony No.7 in E major - Ed. Nowak - 2. Adagio. Sehr feierlich und sehr langsam21:422.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Bruckner: Symphony No.7 in E major - Ed. Nowak - 3. Scherzo: Sehr schnell10:251.49  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Bruckner: Symphony No.7 in E major - Ed. Nowak - 4. Finale: Bewegt doch nicht schnell14:151.89  Buy MP3 


Product Description

DGG 4790320; DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON - Germania; Classica Orchestrale

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Danny's Near-Excellent Adventure 31 July 2013
Format:Audio CD
Be it Bach or Bartok, Barenboim's artistry could be likened to a well-made tomato and cheese sandwich. More or less it does the job. Little thought or maturation is predicated. DB is competent, polished and rarely anything more. Little if anything is residual. His motto could almost be, "Have coin, will record!"

Who has the wherewithal on the `Zon to encompass his discography? Any takers?

DB is variable in Bruckner. His recordings of the 1st, 5th and 9th with Berlin Philharmonic are gastronomic feasts whereas he pulls out the toaster for the remainder of the cycle on Teldec and the DG survey in its entirety. Praise the lord and slice the tomatoes.

This standalone Bruckner Seventh is a success. It's animated in sharp contrast to his B7 with the Berliners. The first movement of the Seventh is a symphony in itself. Barenboim is masterful in his pacing: its meta-narrative is articulated with élan and warmth. He's farsighted and urgent. I was damned surprised by Danny's success in its mighty coda: the tracery of first violins brings the spiral arms of a galaxy to mind. Wagner's elegy is likewise a triumph: the cymbal clash is almost redundant given the wider apotheosis on offer. In short, the first two movements here are magisterially played.

Thereafter his trajectory falters: the Trio in the Scherzo and the second subject in the finale are mannered. What a pity!

The recording is very good without being spectacular: one cannot quite see the bottom of the ocean. Any talk that the Staatskapelle Berlin is the equal of the Philharmoniker under Karajan (say, the 1975 performance) is worthy of Cheech and Chong.

Gresham's Law in reverse (great recordings drive their lessers into oblivion) is implacable in its operations. Accordingly, this disc has a nemesis
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful interpretation; sound, not so much 1 May 2013
By Vinyl Bill - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Barenboim loves Bruckner and conveys his thoughts very well to the orchestra. This is a live recording, but you won't know it until the final applause. I very much enjoyed the music the first and second time I listened to this CD. I'm disappointed by the sound; DG's sound is usually superb, but in this case the music gets "pinched" and "shrill" at the climaxes. Somewhere along the line, a poor digital processor was used. Be prepared to lower the volume or turn down the treble a bit to save your hearing at climaxes. I must say the dynamic range is astounding. At your normal volume level, you won't hear the beginning of the music, but at the climaxes, your neighbors will complain.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Danny's Near-Excellent Adventure 31 July 2013
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Be it Bach or Bartok, Barenboim's artistry could be likened to a well-made tomato and cheese sandwich. More or less it does the job. Little thought or maturation is predicated. DB is competent, polished and rarely anything more. Little if anything is residual. His motto could almost be, "Have coin, will record!"

Who has the wherewithal on the `Zon to encompass his discography? Any takers?

DB is variable in Bruckner. His recordings of the 1st, 5th and 9th with Berlin Philharmonic are gastronomic feasts whereas he pulls out the toaster for the remainder of the cycle on Teldec and the DG survey in its entirety. Praise the lord and slice the tomatoes.

This standalone Bruckner Seventh is a success. It's animated in sharp contrast to his B7 with the Berliners. The first movement of the Seventh is a symphony in itself. Barenboim is masterful in his pacing: its meta-narrative is articulated with élan and warmth. He's farsighted and urgent. I was damned surprised by Danny's success in its mighty coda: the tracery of first violins brings the spiral arms of a galaxy to mind. Wagner's elegy is likewise a triumph: the cymbal clash is almost redundant given the wider apotheosis on offer. In short, the first two movements here are magisterially played.

Thereafter his trajectory falters: the Trio in the Scherzo and the second subject in the finale are mannered. What a pity!

The recording is very good without being spectacular: one cannot quite see the bottom of the ocean. Any talk that the Staatskapelle Berlin is the equal of the Philharmoniker under Karajan (say, the 1975 performance) is worthy of Cheech and Chong.

Gresham's Law in reverse (great recordings drive their lessers into oblivion) is implacable in its operations. Accordingly, this disc has a nemesis.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars **** 1/2 One of Barenboim's strongest Bruckner recordings in a long career 16 July 2012
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
It's not promising when the PR notice says that this live Bruckner Seventh derives from a week-long survey of the nine symphonies. When Barenboim came to Carnegie Hall to pull the same stunt with Mahler's complete symphonies, the critics noted fatigue in the playing - such marathons aren't good for interpretations, either. Masterpieces aren't meant to be rattled off to see how many you can play in the shortest period f time. Barenboim has already recorded two high-profile Bruckner Sevenths with the Chicago Sym. (DG) and the Berlin Phil. (Teldec), and his reputation for imitating Furtwangler in this composer's works has become a canard by now.

To begin with, the recorded sound is very good in terms of clarity, naturalness, and detail. The orchestra, which isn't world class, plays well without rivaling either the Berlin or Vienna Philharmonic - nonetheless the Staatskapelle Berlin is taken from the pit orchestra of the Berlin State Opera and certainly represents a high standard of playing. As for the fatigue factor, maybe I was primed to listen for it, but it does seem as if the performance isn't an event but an example of reliable musicians working at a good professional level. That special intensity which marks a lasting performance isn't quite present, not that anything goes amiss. But when the solo flute enters with its first-movement solos, for example, I don't hear the player reaching for expression.

On a more positive note, insofar as Barenboim's previous Bruckner struck me as inflated at times, this one is very well managed, scaled for great impact where it counts but leaving room for softer, more modest stretches, too. Nothing drags, and there is forward momentum without allowing the line to sag. Barenboim is a seasoned veteran used to conducting at the highest levels,and it shows. Two fairly recent Sevenths that I've heard from Marek Janowski (Pentatone) and Kent Nagano (Sony) were much less impressive. In fact, the longer I listened, the more impressed I was with Barenboim's ability to find something to say in this symphony. The Adagio in particular is done with flexibility, poise, and sensitive phrasing; it doesn't feel externalized.

Another virtue of this performance is that Barenboim doesn't undercut his best moments with willful intrusions later on. There's a sense of warmth and spontaneity that holds good throughout. Perhaps he has stopped trying to be self-consciously great, and as a result his natural musical gifts, which are phenomenal, emerge more clearly. The Scherzo is unusually light and unforced. It does settle into a jog trot, however, making this the weakest movement. Orchestra fatigue may be settling in, too. The finale returns to form, sounding bright and alert. In all, this is a superb reading that falls just short of the best, largely because of the Scherzo.
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