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Bruckner:Sym. 4


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Product details

  • Audio CD (15 Jan. 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Universal Music & VI
  • ASIN: B00000DWGY
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,456,730 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 25 Sept. 2013
Format: Audio CD
Reader, I have decided to wade into the swamp of `Bruckner in Russia' - what are the Pripet Marshes in comparison? One would have thought that the fate of a certain Austrian corporal would have been salutary but no: across the River Bug I troop.

You've heard of the proverbial `Battle of the Bands'. It was ever so thoughtful of Gennady Rozhdestvensky to stage a `Battle of the Brass' with the Bruckner Fourth as a backdrop. It's a hotly contested affair. The trumpets, trombones, horns and the solitary bass tuba seek to deafen each other at the merest hint of a fortissimo. Tension in Bruckner is a good thing but not to this degree. I was genuinely fearful of listening to the Scherzo to the point where I considered stuffing my ears with wax like the sailors of Odysseus lest madness come upon me. Somehow or other, I survived the tribulation.

Rozhdestvensky appears to be using a truncated version (no less) of Schalk/Loewe's edition of 1888: amazingly, the finale lasts less than 14 minutes. It is not the last word in symphonic logic. Worse still, the aural picture is unstable. A large auditorium is clearly in use. For whatever reason, the orchestra recedes from view arbitrarily (say, the passage leading into the coda of the finale) as if the sound-engineer (Boris Yeltsin, sodden with vodka?), was playing havoc with the microphones.

I thoroughly enjoyed Rozhdestvensky's performance of Bruckner Fifth: it's comically inept. This traversal of the earlier work is a travesty. Unless it features on Hell's playlist - lava-slides, here I come - I will never return to it.

In closing, the kewpie doll is awarded to the trumpets: their blatancy and shrillness, once heard, are ineffaceable.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Russian Lurkers in St Florian's 25 Sept. 2013
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Reader, I have decided to wade into the swamp of `Bruckner in Russia' - what are the Pripet Marshes in comparison? One would have thought that the fate of a certain Austrian corporal would have been salutary but no: across the River Bug I troop.

You've heard of the proverbial `Battle of the Bands'. It was ever so thoughtful of Gennady Rozhdestvensky to stage a `Battle of the Brass' with the Bruckner Fourth as a backdrop. It's a hotly contested affair. The trumpets, trombones, horns and the solitary bass tuba seek to deafen each other at the merest hint of a fortissimo. Tension in Bruckner is a good thing but not to this degree. I was genuinely fearful of listening to the Scherzo to the point where I considered stuffing my ears with wax like the sailors of Odysseus lest madness come upon me. Somehow or other, I survived the tribulation.

Rozhdestvensky appears to be using a truncated version (no less) of Schalk/Loewe's edition of 1888: amazingly, the finale lasts less than 14 minutes. It is not the last word in symphonic logic. Worse still, the aural picture is unstable. A large auditorium is clearly in use. For whatever reason, the orchestra recedes from view arbitrarily (say, the passage leading into the coda of the finale) as if the sound-engineer (Boris Yeltsin, sodden with vodka?) was playing havoc with the microphones.

I thoroughly enjoyed Rozhdestvensky's performance of Bruckner Fifth: it's comically inept. This traversal of the earlier work is a travesty. Unless it features on Hell's playlist - lava-slides, here I come - I will never return to it.

In closing, the kewpie doll is awarded to the trumpets: their blatancy and shrillness, once heard, are ineffaceable.
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