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Bruckner: Symphony No. 9
 
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Bruckner: Symphony No. 9

12 Mar. 2014 | Format: MP3

£8.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
25:42
30
2
10:15
30
3
26:16
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 1999
  • Release Date: 12 Mar. 2014
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: (C) 1999 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:02:13
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00IY4GJZO
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 242,213 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 20 Mar. 2015
Format: MP3 Download
This is a Bruckner Ninth that has nothing to do with the Book of the Apocalypse. Canonical it is not. The Pale Rider has been displaced by a sub-cutaneous neuroticism. No celestial quay is sighted. Worse still, shortcomings of vision are compounded by those of execution.

Contrary to expectations, the Dresden Staatskapelle sounds like a cat on a hot tin roof (for instance, how tentative it sounds at 20'18" ff in the finale - and other episodes come to mind such as 7'46" in the Scherzo) The live recording is not opulent; I suspect it was edited from a series of concerts (to wit, the howler that has been semi-excluded at 0'10" into the Scherzo). Sinopoli can be intermittently impressive in Bruckner but here he doesn't have the music under his skin: there's no innigkeit. Consider the finale at 16'41" with the horn call where Bruckner sinks into himself: the notes evoke nothing beyond themselves. The "Tearing of the Temple Veil" at 21'25"ff in the finale is also a non-event - no wonder the famous pause that follows thereafter is so perfunctory: it befits shadow-boxing. Much the same could be said of the Scherzo which is devoid of menace and un-climactic. There are also some very odd emphases, as if Sinopoli is attempting to channel the Celibidache-within - to wit, the over-prominent cello line in the coda of the first movement. The Ninth Symphony is dotted with many episodes of pizzicato; ever so fussily, Sinopoli over-characterizes them as if they're talismanic.

I was not surprised to see that Classics Today also bucketed this recording for not dissimilar reasons. This is the triumph of jumpy intelligence over vision - to no vivid end.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Philoctetes TOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 April 2014
Format: Audio CD
The merit, as so often with Sinopoli's Bruckner, is in the elucidation of texture, the voicing of the orchestra's component parts, at the expense of flow, narrative, rhetoric. As such, the DG engineers must share in the glory, if glory it be. This concert recording, whilst packing plenty of wallop, has an awkward and unconvincing series of episodes written into the outer movements, episodes which hangfire. The scherzo chugs along impressively, but the drama is in short supply. If you want to stand back and admire the fabric of the symphony, rather than what it points to, this recording is for you.

I'll have to make my review of Leitner's concert a 4 now..
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