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Bruckner: 9 Symphonies
 
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Bruckner: 9 Symphonies

8 Feb. 2014 | Format: MP3

£28.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £20.47 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
12:52
30
2
14:16
30
3
8:53
30
4
14:26
30
5
20:44
Disc 2
30
1
21:25
30
2
13:43
30
3
24:41
Disc 3
30
1
21:55
30
2
16:20
30
3
6:52
30
4
11:38
Disc 4
30
1
18:16
30
2
17:33
30
3
6:10
30
4
18:05
30
5
16:44
Disc 5
30
1
15:06
30
2
26:06
30
3
24:05
Disc 6
30
1
18:13
30
2
14:27
30
3
10:43
30
4
20:26
Disc 7
30
1
15:15
30
2
18:57
30
3
7:51
30
4
15:12
Disc 8
30
1
20:05
30
2
21:55
30
3
9:50
30
4
12:26
Disc 9
30
1
24:53
30
2
10:36
30
3
25:50
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 2008
  • Release Date: 8 Feb. 2014
  • Number of Discs: 9
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: (C) 2008 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 9:36:29
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003SOMWMY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 45,120 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By ab on 18 Mar. 2013
Format: Audio CD
Nobody, but nobody, or anyone else, ever recorded better performances of 3, 5, 7, 8 or 9 than those in this box. The sound is a bit tight, but the playing and vision are sublime. There is not much wrong with 1,2,4 or 6 either, except in comparison with the exalted standards of the other five.

If you haven't heard Karajan in Bruckner, even more than in Strauss, and if you love this music, you have no excuse now this is so inexpensive. Do not be put off by the Karajan slayers. In the case of this set they are just plain wrong.

Peerless.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 18 Feb. 2012
Format: Audio CD
This cycle is the keystone of any Bruckner collection. Other than sonics (what a dog-lazy company DG is nowadays, with apologies to Fido) there are no weaknesses here, only mastery of the highest order.

Firstly, a word about this provincial music-teacher from Ansfelden and his long-winded yarns.

"The most crucial difference between Bruckner's symphonies and his church compositions is that the former seem to go beyond religious dogma to express the more fundamental, primitive stratum of feelings that gave these beliefs birth: a sense of awe, born of the naked wonder, and the fear and delight of humanity when confronted with the beauty and power of Nature and the vast riddle of the Cosmos."

Now to the cycle in question. The world has changed. The chances of the same degree of mastery being replicated across the canon at some point in the future are bugger all.

1 - Karajan recorded the First in early 1981. Thankfully he opted for the Linz version rather than the 1890 Vienna re-write where all the exuberance of the work was leached out by the composer himself. The First is a Masterpiece: it is far more worthy of a 'Titan' epithet than the Mahlerian alternative. For years, I was somewhat deterred by the opening bars. Learn from my mistake. The slow movement is as much of a nocturne as its counterpart in the Fourth. And the last movement has no peer in Bruckner's work; it really is, as the composer said himself, someone barging through the door. The Berlin Phil play peerlessly.

2 - Karajan opens up many, but not all, of the cuts in the 1877 Novak. It is a pity that a clarinet rather than a horn closes the slow movement. But again, this is a superlative performance - and it sounds better than the First which was recorded in the same month.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Andrew R. Barnard on 25 Nov. 2011
Format: Audio CD
Perhaps you've noticed that this set has received an exorbitant amount of fame, with many reviewers pointing to this as the definitive set of the Bruckner symphonies. Karajan, we're told, has worked wonders with his Berliners, making for an amazing musical experience.

But I want you to know that this is a terrible set to acquire if you want your Bruckner to be a pleasantry. Perhaps you want to hear the composer interpreted in a matter-of-fact way, eschewing anything that would threaten to grip you or move you too deeply. Karajan cares nothing for the relaxation of his listeners, and he seems to pride himself in his monumental approach to the symphonies. He is taking us to grand heights, soaring above the practicality of life. For this reason, it wouldn't make good background music. It would be too disturbing and moving to listen to this music without giving it your full attention.

Maybe I've scared you away, but I hope and think not. Who ever said that the chief concern in Bruckner is pleasantness? Karajan refuses to let himself be constrained, and his vision in these symphonies is staggering. He is a magnificent master of building the music, preparing us for the impassioned climactic moments without letting go too soon. It would be easy to get lost in the vast scope of things, resulting in chaos. But with Karajan on the podium, never fear. He has a strong grip over his orchestra and everything is done with control, yet vitality is still present. This is not impersonal Bruckner; this is simply Bruckner that is speaking of things that aren't in our reach. The music transports us out of this world, into the skies, if not into heaven itself.

This is what gives this set its almost mysterious nature.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By TIM SULLIVAN on 1 Mar. 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Entirely definitive. I first owned these recordings in Record (Vinyl) form, and when they were lost in shipping many years ago, they were replaced very simply by the CD version, which has also benefited from remastering!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Philoctetes TOP 500 REVIEWER on 14 Dec. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Is it true that those giant Karajan reissues by DG of complete recordings by decade, such as the 82CD box of 1970s recordings, are freshly remastered? Very good news if it is, although fans of the Bruckner sessions won't relish having to buy both '70s and '80s box-sets to get the complete Bruckner package. This slimline reissue is cheap and cheerless: an unappealing greyish-white with cardboard sleeves imprinted with giant vulgar numbers on the front. The previous incarnation, if nothing else, was handsome and imposing on the shelf. An eye-catcher. But times change.

By the very late '70s and into the '80s, the Berlin Phil under HvK's aegis were capable of producing such a gargantuan, saturated symphony that the music could be brought down by the sheer burden of imposed weight. Try the Sibelius 5 from that era. This Bruckner cycle, recorded from 1975-83, has fierce analogue and then fierce digital stereo, the latter afflicting Karajan's debut with the early symphonies (Nos.1-3, "Die Nullte" excluded from condescension). When you add the full force of the BPO, Bruckner's little minx and his other problem children are decimated. Some Brucknerians will love that sort of thing, and I'm certainly no fan of the vibrato-free/strings lite/quick-as-we-can school of interpretation, but this is too burdensome to be borne. On the plus side, HvK does choose well - the Linz edition, the 1889 3rd - but as he himself demonstrates elsewhere in the set, an exercise of power need not be one of aggression.

But then, the avalanches keep coming.
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