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Brotherhood Of The Wolf [DVD] [2001]

103 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Samuel Le Bihan, Vincent Cassel, Mark Dacascos, Monica Bellucci, Jérémie Renier
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French, German, Italian
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Universal
  • DVD Release Date: 23 Sept. 2002
  • Run Time: 133 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (103 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00006FI5P
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 9,699 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

France, 1766. Sent by the King to investigate a number of attacks by a terrifying wolf-like beast in Gévaudan, scientist and adventurer Grégoire de Fronsac and his martial-arts-trained Iroquois sidekick Mani arrive to find a community pregnant with many secrets. As the beast continues to ravage the area, Grégoire and Mani's investigations reveal that it is in the control of a sinister local religious cult. But can they catch it before it claims any more lives?

From Amazon.co.uk

If you crave an over-the-top historical kung fu-fantasy epic with a good dose of voluptuous nudity, bravura machismo, and passions so intense they verge on ridiculous, then Brotherhood of the Wolf is for you. Based (loosely) on an 18th-century legend, this French film follows a hunky scientist (Samuel Le Bihan) and his Iroquois sidekick/spiritual partner (Mark Dacascos) as they pursue a monstrous wolf ravaging the French countryside. Along the way Le Bihan gets entwined with a beautiful noblewoman (Emilie Dequenne) and a gorgeous prostitute (Monica Belluci) with secrets to tell. The plot grows more and more incomprehensible, but the mix of torrid emotions, outrageous action sequences, and lurid titillation is really what the movie is about. Ignore the highbrow philosophising and confused political intrigue; just enjoy the sensual images.--Bret Fetzer

On the DVD: Brotherhood of the Wolf is a film which revels in excess, yet the extra features on the disc are surprisingly sparse. The DVD boasts a programme on the legend of the Beast of the Gevaudan, as well as the original theatrical trailer, which was obviously geared towards an American audience--all action, no (French) dialogue. Unfortunately, though the DVD gives the viewer the option of watching the film in French (with English subtitles) or dubbed in English, only the dubbed version has Dolby 5.1 sound. Viewers who want to watch this film in its original language are forced to settle for 2.0. --Rob Burrow

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By red-squirrel on 13 Jan. 2004
Format: DVD
If you like your historical dramas rich in costume, sets & martial arts (?!), then this is the film for you!
Set in 1764, it centres on the investigations of two men (Gregoire de Fronsac & his kung-fu Mohawk pal - no, really) into the appearence of a mysterious savage beast, which hunts down women & children mercilessly in the Gevaudan region of France.
Cut through the martial arts bizarritude, & you have a rather decent film which supplies all the necessary: action; intrigue; love interest; guns; wolves; exploding pumpkins; prostitutes & lots of peasants thrashing about in mud.
The actors are well cast & include the wonderful Vincent Cassel as a disturbingly incestuous bad guy. The soundtrack is a voluptuous mix of bagpipes, accordians, & 'Gladiator' style atonal wailings. Blend these with cartoon style incidental sound effects (Kerrrunnch! Kablammnn!), a darkened room & a good sound system & you're in for an eerie time. (Watch it with subtitles to complete the experience.)
As a whole, this tale is a rich masterpiece which contains a more than a grain of truth at it's heart. If you can suspend your disbelief for 2 hours 17 minutes (plus the historical docmentary) you shouldn't be disappointed.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on 1 Mar. 2005
Format: DVD
Wow, they certainly tossed just about everything into the pot in making this one, including the French Revolution. "Le Pacte des Loups" starts off as a exquisitely photographed costume drama/horror flick set in 18th century France with a poor peasant girl being hunted down by an unseen beast. My first thought that this was a beautiful film, more reminiscent of a Jane Austen period piece than a horror flick from Hammer Studio. But then our hero, Grégoire de Fronsac (Samuel Le Bihan) and his faithful Indian companion, Mani (Mark Dacasos), show up and we suddenly discover the film is also a cross between "The Last of the Mohicans" and "Couching Tiger, Hidden Dragon." However, since this is movie based on a legend regarding a huge wolf ravaging the French countryside, this hardly seems the time to insist upon a standard of realism.
The collaboration between director Christophe Gans and cinematographer Dan Laustsen results in some beautiful and memorable camera shots (most notably, as the camera tracks up a woman's nude body it morphs into snow covered terrain), often playing with time and movement to great effect. In the deleted scenes Gans provides a sort of mini-commentary on the film that is quite interesting in terms of setting up the film's dynamic, especially regarding the opening sequence originally conceived for the film and the scene that replace it. Laustsen is the cinematographer on upcoming "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen," and my assumption is that when I see that film I will have a better sense of who contributed the most to "Brotherhood of the Wolf.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By LoBo on 9 Aug. 2012
Format: Blu-ray
This is isn't the best film i have see, but some good action scenes and cinematography. I think the story is good and Mark Dacascos is great as Mani.

Picture quality: 4/5

I only saw this on DVD for many years. I think the picture quality is much better than my DVD. Even though this uses an older HD master i think it still looked good. No DNR has been used and the colours, details looks good to me. The Beast which i believe was mostly made using CGI, looked surprisingly good to me in 1080p.

Audio quality: 4/5

This has only 1 audio track, the French: DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 . I think it sounded good with some bass with the punches and kicks. That special sword the villain uses makes good use of the Stereo effects. Neat effect. Those gunshots also had nice bass and being loud.

The Film: 3.5/5
Overall: 4/5
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 Mar. 2007
Format: DVD
Imagine a fairy tale... but with grit, blood, stylized camerawork, and lots of French kung-fu.

That about sums up "Brotherhood of the Wolf," a gritty horror/martial-arts/erotic/action movie loosely based on the French legend of the Beast of Gévaudan, but with a chilling story woven around it. Christophe Gans could have given it a bit more character development, but it's a simple flaw in an otherwise horrifying, intense experience.

An enormous, savage wolflike beast is killing young women and children in the French countryside. And so royal naturalist Grégoire de Fronsac (Samuel Le Bihan) and his Native American sidekick Mani (Mark Dacascos) arrive to investigate, and find that the local authorities are incompetant, the Beast is larger than any wolf, and it's still savaging the locals.

Mani and Grégoire set about tracking down the beast, finding it to be too large and intelligent (and with metal fangs too). But something more sinister than animal attacks is going on -- Fronsac uncovers a mysterious, treasonous society connected to the Beast, and a mysterious courtesan (Monica Belucci) with hidden motives.

It may be based on a real incident, but "Brotherhood of the Wolf" soon takes off into its own storyline. And director Gans crams the whole thing with whatever he likes -- horror, action, political period drama, and some French martial arts. It's like an old fairy tale mutated into a live-action anime.

And Gans' direction style can include a little of everything too -- he handles rosy-skied romantic scenes with the same dexterity as raw sex scenes, rainy sludge and bloody chases.
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