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Britain's Future Navy Hardcover – 15 Mar 2012


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Pen & Sword Maritime (15 Mar 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848842910
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848842915
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 16 x 2.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 468,212 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

Having provided an outstanding overview of the Royal Navy's mission over the past three decades, veteran BBC correspondent Nick Childs has now turned to the Fleet of today and tomorrow. Britain's Future Navy is effectively a collection of penetrating essays on issues affecting strategy, long-term planning and equipment from the future carriers and F35 Joint Strike Fighters to Type 45 destroyers, manpower issues, potential operations and global partnerships. - Navy News

About the Author

Nick Childs is a World Affairs Correspondent for BBC News. He has previously been Defence & Security Correspondent and Political Correspondent for BBC World Service radio and World television and he was the BBC's inaugural Pentagon Correspondent. He has covered international news for the BBC since 1982 (including the conflicts in the Gulf and elsewhere in the Middle East, Afghanistan, Sierra Leone and the Balkans). He worked as a reporter for Jane's Defence Weekly and has written numerous articles on naval and other defence issues. His last book was The Age of Invincible (Pen & Sword, 2009). --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Robert Wallace on 11 Aug 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is not a simple "this is the Modern Navy" nor is it a " We must have more ships" polemic

It is an informed look at how we arrived where we are and what the options are going forward

Nothing is easy and some of the choices will be very hard - both politically and economically

it would have benefited from more illustrations - especially of the non-RN ships referred to as possible replacements/alternatives

I think this is an essential read for anyone looking at the future of the UK Armed services
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy on 23 April 2012
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Since the end of the Cold War, the size of Royal Navy has declined, but the number of tasks asked of it has arguably increased. An analysis of future strategic challenges - such as rogue and failing states, increased competition for natural resources, and the rise of new maritime powers like China and India - suggest this trend will accelerate in future. Indeed, in the in the era of globalisation, the sea is more important to the UK's security and prosperity than ever before, and yet the role of the Royal Navy seems at best undervalued, and at worst unknown, to most politicians and to the public at large. The decommissioned aircraft carrier Ark Royal (a class of warship to which Nick Childs devoted his earlier work, The Age of Invincible: The Ship That Defined the Modern Royal Navy) is an iconic emblem of the Senior Service's current malaise.

A former BBC defence correspondent, now covering world affairs, Nick Childs is ideally placed to provide an objective but well-informed analysis of the Royal Navy's current position and future prospects in an uncertain but interconnected world. The author reviews the key projects that will form the centrepiece of the future Royal Navy, each of which has endured a tortured development history: the Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carrier, Astute class submarine, Type 45 destroyer and Type 26 frigate. However, Childs also takes time to discuss some of the less high profile elements that help constitute a balanced fleet - the utility and flexibility of amphibious forces, the continuing importance of minehunters, and the potential offered by the Royal Fleet Auxiliary, the Royal Navy's much overlooked `Cinderella' service.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Steve on 7 July 2012
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This author really knows his stuff and all sea blind British politicians should read this book. We are an island nation with around 96 % of all we consume coming by sea. Britain's sea lanes need to be protected as theres choke points around the world. When the Straits of Hormuz are blockaded, probably by Iran and the price of petrol goes through the roof, the British people will complain. We won't be able to do anything about it acting independently as the sea blind politicians have gotten rid of Britain's naval capabilities like sufficient hull numbers in escorts. We can't rely on America either as they're now looking towards the Pacific because of the Pacific rim economies and the rise of China. This book is very thoroughly researched and is well written. It gives an interesting account of Britain's sea power, or lack of it with practical solutions for future maritime defence needs. I thoroughly recommend it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Skimmer on 5 Sep 2012
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This is the best book on Naval affairs that I have read for years. It summarises what has happened over the years and the impact on the Navy. It also exposes the blinkered vision of John Nott, leader of his infamous defence review in the early 1980's. Well worth reading.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. V. Harland on 7 May 2012
Format: Hardcover
Nick Childs's book should be compulsory reading for our useless politicians who have allowed,over only two decades,our Senior Service to decline to the depths it has. And yet despite this seemingly endless downward spiral in capabilities there is much hope for the future if a 21st century Nelson will come forward. The Lord Admiral's much repeated cry of a lack of frigates might have been relevant in 1805 but it is not today. Childs suggests that the future of the RN is dependent on the future Type 26 frigate. I disagree. This project should be scrapped now to ENSURE the future of the Navy. In 1989 my letter to the Telegraph highlighted the decline of the frigate and it's high cost. That is even more true today. The frigate is finished and has no role to play in the 21 st century. The author only touches on the new US littoral combat ships,two classes of which are being built. I suggest that the Freedom class should be built in large numbers under licence from Marinette Marine- maybe as many as 30 ships. These are the frigates of the future and will ensure the sea-going 'commands' the Navy needs to ensure it's career structure. A second batch of T 45 destroyers in addition will provide a superb Navy that is equipped to protect our national interests. I will now donate this excellent book to my local High School library. Thank you, Nick Childs.
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