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Bringing It All Back Home
 
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Bringing It All Back Home

6 May 1991 | Format: MP3

£6.39 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £5.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:21
30
2
2:46
30
3
3:54
30
4
2:51
30
5
3:04
30
6
2:35
30
7
6:29
30
8
5:30
30
9
5:40
30
10
7:29
30
11
4:12
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 22 Mar. 1965
  • Release Date: 22 Mar. 1965
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 46:51
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B006J1U61M
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 14,466 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 July 2000
Format: Audio CD
From this distance it's hard to imagine the shock this must have caused when it first came out. Dylan's first four albums (all big sellers) had been entirely acoustic; just Bob on vocals, guitar and harmonica. This opens with the pounding, very plugged-in 'rap' Subterranean Homesick Blues and all at once with this ultimate crossover song, intelligent rock, artistic rock was born. The opening scene of Dylan's documentary the same year (Don't Look Back) also used this song to make it the first song to have what we would now call a video. Dylan's lyrics here are perfect, half-way between the impassioned beliefs of his folk protests and the beautiful nonsense of much of Blonde on Blonde.
Love Minus Zero/ No Limit is still for me the perfect love song, and I challenge you not to be moved as the album slips out of the bluesy-rock boisterousness to the more thoughtful atmosphere of pared-down voice and guitar. It is this second half that really makes the album. It's as if Dylan has just been entertaining you for half-an-hour, sits down and says "Now. Let me show you what I can do." There can be few songs in his canon more bitter than It's Alright Ma, and few more tender than It's All Over Now, Baby Blue, both made from the simplest of ingredients.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A. Willard on 26 April 2010
Format: Audio CD
It took me quite some time to get `into' Dylan. From my early teens I was buying as many albums as I could afford but it wasn't till after I'd passed twenty that I broke my duck with him (`Blood On The Tracks'). I wasn't sure about his voice (`of sand and glue' as Bowie memorably described it), and that bloody harmonica got on my nerves. Even then I didn't rush out and add to my collection (Neil Young remained my main `dirty hippy secret' in those days of punk), but just bought the odd one every now and then. `Bringing It All' I've probably owned for less than ten years but well, it's the one, isn't it?

There's lots of albums I love more, there's even a couple of Dylan's that I listen to more, but this is the one, isn't it? This is the one where he truly became `Bob Dylan' - nobody's spokesman but his own, constrained only by the limits of his own imagination. Just listen to the songs! - they're almost ridiculously brilliant. You want social commentary? (though from a more cynical, worldly point-of -view than previously), then try `Subterranean Homesick Blues' or `It's Alright Ma'. You want to hear a beautiful tune? Then try `She Belongs To Me' or `Love Minus Zero' or Mr Tambourine Man'. You want to hear him having a good sneer? (and, let's face it, nobody sneers as well as His Bobness), then try `Maggie's Farm' or `It's All Over Now, Baby Blue'. Even the `fillers', those songs which aren't really supposed to be up to much, they're all really great as well! (That's `Outlaw Blues', `On The Road Again' and `Bob Dylan's 115th Dream' in case you hadn't already guessed).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Nicholl on 17 May 2009
Format: Audio CD
This was the very first Dylan album I ever bough back in 1977 when I had begun to latch onto his genius. This is the album where controversially Dylan moved away from the acoustic folk of his first four recordings and towards that of rock with the Hawks in tow (Later to become The Band).This was the birth of Folk Rock & Intelligant rock song writing. There are still traces of his acoustic past with Mr Tambourene Man and Gates of Eden, but it is the wonderful songs such as Subterranean Homesick Blues, Maggies Farm, Love Minus Zero/No Limit etc that really nail this recording. There is still some of his wit and humor, present on earlier recordings, with the wonderful epic 'Bob Dylans 115th Dream' (Whatever he was on at this time worked wonders for his creative imagination). Most will cite Blood On The Tracks as the finest recording by Dylan ever, and I for one would find it hard to disagree, but for me there are at least 3 essential Dylan recordings and they are Bringing It All Back Home / Desire / Blood On The Tracks. Each are so good for different reasons, that I feel it is impossible to name any one of them as his best. If you are a Dylan Fan then I am talking to the converted and you will be familiar with this masterpiece, but if you are new to his work but don't know where to begin, try Bringing It All Back Home!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 2 Aug. 2012
Format: Audio CD
This 1965 release is the fifth studio album from icon Bob Dylan, and for me one of his all time greatest works. Dylan's music has always been evolving, and here he was moving away from the folk troubadour or protest singer images of earlier albums into more experimental in interesting pastures. Chief among the innovations for this album was the introduction of electric guitar, a move that famously outraged his folk audience.

Dylan used his new sound to craft some absolutely wonderful songs. Songs that I can just listen to over and over again. From the romanticism of `love minus zero/no limit', the trippiness of `hey Mr. Tambourine man', the weird stream of consciousness of `Bob Dylan's 115th dream', the anger at the shackles imposed on him by the folk movement (Maggie's Farm)and the absurd but infections opener `subterranean homesick blues', Dylan manages to synthesise all his previous styles, electric and acoustic, into one glorious, personal whole that will have something to say to everyone. It's a classic album, and one of Dylan's best. 5 stars.
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