Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £4.99

Save £3.00 (38%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy (Bridget Jones series Book 3) Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 3,074 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£4.99

Length: 498 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of £3.99 after you buy the Kindle book.
Audible Narration: Ready
  • Similar books to Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy (Bridget Jones series Book 3)

Half Term Sale: Books from 99p
Keep everyone busy with a good read from 99p until 28 February, 2016. Shop now
Get a £1 credit for movies or TV
Enjoy £1.00 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle ebook from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle ebooks) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at on Friday, 26 February, 2016. Terms and conditions apply

Product Description

Review

"Bridget's back and it's v.v. good... I laughed, I cried and most of all I loved'" Daily Mail "Sharp and humorous...snappily written, observationally astute...genuinely moving" New York Times Book Review "A fun fast-paces, entertaining ride...I devoured the book in two days" Cosmopolitan "Laugh out loud funny" Financial Times "You'll be left feeling like you've just met up with an old pal you haven't seen for ages - and wish you could have done it sooner." Closer

Book Description

A new Bridget Jones novel by Helen Fielding

THE NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER

Shortlisted for the Specsavers National Book Popular Fiction Book of the Year Award

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2479 KB
  • Print Length: 498 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0345806344
  • Publisher: Vintage Digital (10 Oct. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00D1VKZ3M
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 3,074 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,287 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I think I must be reading a different book to a lot of the other reviewers. Here are my comments (mild spoilers):

- Bridget Jones was an infuriating, self-obsessed (but lovable) charicature in the first two books. Have people forgotten this? She was less irritating in the films but I always wanted to give the character in the book a good shake. And that's saying something coming from one of life's procrastinators (e.g. I should be preparing for important meeting right now but instead am reviewing this book). Anyway, she's the same now.
- Quite why people think she should have "grown up" between mid-30s to early 50s is beyond me. Mid-30s is pretty "grown up"! Do people really change that much as they get older??
- Not sure why people think she isn't putting her children first. Errr ... she is, but she is also a human being and allowed a life independent of her children. And what on earth is wrong with her wanting to move on and find another relationship some 4-5 years after the tragic death of the love of her life
- I personally think Helen Fielding has dealt with the whole issue of bereavement and the difficulty in moving on/guilt/etc very well.
- Also not sure why readers are getting their knickers in a twist about certain characters being in/out of the book and how the book has been written with the film in mind. Of course it has been!!

In summary, I haven't been able to put it down. Loved it!
Comment 6 of 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I bought this having read the original two books years ago and I enjoyed those thoroughly. The singleton Bridget of the 1990s was a cultural phenomenon many could relate to. However, this third instalment is a huge disappointment and I fear that Helen Fielding may have tarnished Bridget's legacy permanently. I had to force myself to finish it as it was actually a rather unpleasant read.

*This review contains spoilers*

In my opinion Helen Fielding has transformed Bridget from a loveably scatty character into a selfish monster. It made sense that a singleton in her 30s such as Bridget would be wrapped up in her own feelings and goals, because she was a single working woman trying to make her own way in life. However, in 'Mad About The Boy', Bridget is 51 and a widow with two young children. Therefore, you would assume that she would have developed as a character during the 15 fictional years that have passed since the last instalment but for some strange reason, she has not. 51-year-old Bridget does not appear to have developed psychologically in any way since the last book, despite having been through several life-changing experiences. Although the opening section of the book is quite moving, it soon becomes clear that Bridget's general approach to life has remained the same as before, which just doesn't make sense. This in itself makes it extremely difficult to visualise Bridget as being 51 rather than in her mid-thirties.

Helen Fielding has taken Bridget's least attractive traits and exaggerated them to the point where all her former charm has been obliterated. Bridget is completely obsessed with her own needs and desires, primarily the pursuit of men and her physical appearance.
Read more ›
1 Comment 50 of 53 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having read the original two Bridget Jones novels and seen the films and found both highly entertaining, I was looking forward to this update. Unfortunately I have been highly disappointed. This is drivel of the highest order, consisting of mainly inane tweets and text messages. Bridget Jones is in her fifties with two very small children (although the ages aren't clear, I surmised they were very young by the fact that one speaks like a three year old and the other is in primary school) and seems to have continued her ridiculously represented middle class chaotic life unabated by family responsibilities. The whole novel felt like it was still stuck in the late nineties except for the insertion of 21st century social media ie. twitter, texting and online dating sites. I read the book and deleted it from my kindle in disgust.
Comment 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
First things first; I am a man. A not very fabulous man at that.
Feel free to disregard the rest of my review if you wish as clearly I am not Helen Fielding's target market either now or 15 years ago. In my defense, I did read and enjoy Bridget Jones' Diary back in the day. Oh and I have childcare responsibilities so a grown up Bridget should be right up my street.....

ANYWAY. Now you know my credentials or lack there of let's get on with the review:

I agree with every one of the 1 star reviews here, this is a dreadful book. All the points scored against it are easy shots:

The character has not changed in any way in 15 years despite parenthood and two significant bereavements

The tragic events glossed over in the recap are far more interesting then the trivia that makes up the actual plot of the novel, is Helen Fielding scared of depth?

It reads like a synopsis for a movie with Hugh Grant's character shoe horned in purely so the producers of the inevitable film can include his name on the poster

It is not funny - the comedy is horribly contrived and falls flat on it's bottom at every turn

The story is utter trivia - did I mention that already? It bears repeating!

And you will no doubt find your own list of personal pet hates.
Here are mine:

The dismal cultural research (Plants Vs Zombies is not a game in which children use zombies to destroy plants, there are no 'levels' to complete in Minecraft, the last time a child said "Epic Fail" in real life was 2010 and even then they were eternally shunned by their peers for using such dated parlance).

The constant product placement masquerading as authenticity (Apple and Grazia must be delighted among many, many others).
Read more ›
17 Comments 220 of 248 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions