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Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason Film Tie-In Paperback – 1 Oct 2004


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Product details

  • Paperback: 422 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; Film tie-in ed edition (1 Oct 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 033043358X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330433587
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 2.7 x 17.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (264 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 714,065 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Amazon Review

7:15 am Hurrah! The wilderness years are over. For four weeks and five days now have been in functional relationship with adult male thereby proving am not love pariah as previously feared.
So begins The Edge of Reason, Bridget Jones' hilarious foray into the not-so-sexy realities of relationships, the laughable legions of self-help theories and a television career that would have her model "tiny shorts next to a blow-up of Fergie in gym wear". Picking up where Bridget Jones' Diary left off, everyone's favourite singleton has finally landed her love, Mark Darcy. However, she's finding--among other things--that her dreamboat is less than ideal. Aside from never doing the washing up or foraging through the isles at Tesco, Mark, it seems, has taken an interest in the viperous "jellyfish" Rebecca, who has "thighs like a baby giraffe" and a penchant for boyfriend snatching.

If that isn't enough, Richard "I'm thinking bunny girl! I'm thinking Gladiator! I'm thinking canvassing MP!" Finch, Bridget's smarmy, cocaine-encrusted boss and Executive Producer of Sit Up, wants her to be the show's clown, in effect making her the arse of television. What's more, a builder who has an obsession for large, slimy fish seems to have forgotten about the hole he knocked out in her flat, putting her entire life on display for the neighbours. Not to mention a mother who wants her to go to see Ms. Saigon with a Kikuya tribesman hijacked from Kenya.

Never fear, Bridge's singleton posse--Shazzer, Jude and Tom--are always a phone call away and armed with bottles of Chardonnay, packs of Silk Cut, pizza and a cornucopia of self-help literature. Whether they're decoding acronyms in singles ads (GSOH and WLTM? "Giant sore on head. Willy, limp, thin mollusc."), developing the ground-breaking "Pashima theory" or dolling out unsolicited advice, the FOBs (friends of Bridget) make up most of the comedy.

Although The Edge of Reason is filled with signature B.J. manoeuvres, such as drunken Christmas card writing and wearing an unruly rubber girdle, it's a departure from the original. Throughout most of its 422 pages the plot clips at a steady rate, then, much like Bridget's train of thought, the ending skitters, careens and breaks off into two incoherent tracks--one more absurd than the other. The outcome is a metamorphosed Bridget, one more reminiscent of a British Alley McBeal than the personification of England's everywoman. --Rebekah Warren --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Review

'Bridget Jones is no mere fictional character, she's the Spirit of the Age' Evening Standard

'Could Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason really be as funny as its predecessor? The answer is yes . . . Bridget, the original Singleton, is on ripping form in the sequel . . . But she is far more than the patron saint of single women: she is everyman, or rather, everyperson' Express

‘Helen Fielding has created the most enchanting heroine for the millennium’ Jilly Cooper

'Austen, as before, in Fielding's model, radically but affectionately updated . . . There is, to be honest, a bit of Bridget Jones in a lot of the women and men of a certain generation, and to have those aspects so affectionately rendered, and both ridiculed and subversively celebrated, is a welcome treat' Times Literary Supplement

'Bridget Jones's phenomenal success is not just because of her creator's brilliant wit, comic timing and social observation, but because she captures what - alas - it is like to be female . . . I laughed out loud many time while reading The Edge of Reason. Fielding is excellent at a mixture of perception and comedy, capturing thoughts everyone has but hasn't actually expressed' Daily Mail

'Fielding has produced a genuinely original fictional voice. Like Anita Loos before her or, perhaps more pertinently, E. M. Delafield in her Diary of a Provincial Lady, she has created a devastatingly funny parody of her life and times . . . Any woman of a certain age can recognize elements of Bridget in herself and will have enormous fun trying to spot them in the book' Daily Telegraph

‘If you loved Bridget Jones’s Diary, you’ll love this; there is no diminution of the freshness or fun, or of Fielding’s underlying intelligence. Success has not spoiled her – she has simply gained in confidence and aplomb . . . Fielding has a seam here she can mine endlessly until she herself gets bored, which I dare say will be long before her readers do’ Mail on Sunday

'Bridget is probably the most successful comic creation of this decade, the most controversial and talked-about female fictional character since Lolita . . . Bridget terminology has slipped into common parlance . . . She is still on superb form; get someone to buy you this book for Christmas, read it through in one afternoon, hoot out loud at the many v. good bits' Stephanie Merritt, Observer

‘Funnier and more accomplished than the original diary, and in fact takes recognition humour into a new dimension . . . A glorious read, and there is a laugh on every page’ Sunday Times

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 23 Aug 2001
Format: Paperback
I normally don't read sequels as when there's a happy ending in the first book I prefer to just leave it there than picking up the second part but I'd heard so much about this book that in the end I had to read it out of curiosity.
Though many of the people I had spoken to about this book thought that it wasn't as good as the original I totally disagree. I love this book even more than the diary!!
I just had to find out what happened between Bridget and Mark Darcy. The only disappointment was that Bridget's best friend Tom doesn't seem to appear as much as I'd liked.
I loved the way that Mark Darcy is based not only on Colin Firth but characters he has played in the past, not only Mr Darcy but Paul Ashworth in Fever Pitch. This was great as it gave Mark Darcy more character and wasn't just a copy of Jane Austen's Darcy.
I laughed more and I cried during the Persuasion chapter and cared more for Bridget than I did in the first book.
But I must thank Helen Fielding because she has introduced me to Jane Austen who I'd never considered reading before. I'm very grateful thank you!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 Dec 1999
Format: Hardcover
I had just arrived in London to visit my parents and was browsing through a WHSmith when I discovered a huge display of "The Edge of Reason". Because I live in America 99.9% of the year, I wasn't up on my Bridget Jones news to know that there was a sequel. Helen Fielding proved a good sequel does exist. I loved Bridget all over again and this time, I especially loved her girlfriends. Especially the male-bashing but secretely male-needy Shaz. (Doesn't everyone have a friend like her?!) I loved all the great references to possitive self-talk borrowed from a cheaper form of therapy known as "self-help books". I must admit that I was standing in the middle of the great dining hall of Harrod's reading Bridget's brilliant journalistic debut interview and laughing outloud. "The Edge of Reason" will take you from plot to plot laughing and amazed. Bridget has one wild year ahead and this is one wildly funny book. If you loved the first book, you will love the sequel. Thank you BJ for giving women a new voice of insanity!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 29 Nov 1999
Format: Hardcover
An immensely engaging, entertaining book, this is by turns hilariously funny (the interview with Colin Firth is a particular delight) and, surprisingly, deeply affecting - striking straight to the heart of the 30-something and of modern society.
The Austen parody is even more successful than in the first "Diary", by virtue of its subtlety - it is breathtakingly clever, but also pleasingly irreverent, and written with the same sense of communicated enjoyment as Austen's own work.
Fielding has it all in this novel: vivid characters (a new set of friends for everyone who encounters the book!), a superb evocation of late 20th century life, deft, clever, unpretentious and quite uproarious humour, and a light touch in creating an effortless classic which remains in the mind much longer than the average relationship of the protagonists!
Definitely the book to cheer up a dull British November... or, one would imagine, a stint in a Thai prison...
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jasmin Holländer on 14 Dec 2003
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed reading this book, although it was not as good as the first one. I did laugh as much reading this book as I did when read first one, but last book was not near as frustrating as this one. half the time I held my breath in nervousity and frustration over Brigdet's unreasonable behavior, half the time had to force myself not to shout to the book to stop being such a silly cow.

Since my native tongue is not English I had some difficulties with the British slang, and the many adjectives, but once I really got in to the book, that was not a real problem.
If yoy are not already addicted to Bridget Jones, you will be after have read this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "ickle_diva" on 15 Jan 2004
Format: Paperback
After reading the first “diary”, I was compelled to read this sequel and see if it lived up to my expectations… and it did more than that!
This book is the most enjoyable piece of writing to read for anyone, especially “Singletons” who know exactly what Bridget is going through. The book picks up from where we left Bridget and Mark, in their newly found romance, however this is Bridget Jones’s life and nothing ever goes to plan. Especially when the man of her dreams becomes all too real… and doesn’t know how to clean up! With a wedding on the way, problems with the family and her friends, Bridget escapes to Thailand only to be greeted with yet more situations that Helen Fielding creates.
From her parents to her friends; work to love, even her sacred self-help books all come under fire in this enthralling novel. Bridget Jones is an amazing character and the first film doesn’t do Helen Fielding’s work any justice, I only hope the second one can live up to an amazing piece of work!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By thecoffeehouse204 on 3 Jun 2003
Format: Paperback
I feel a little behind the times having only just read both of the bridget jones books but it's better late than never. I managed to read Edge of Reason cover to cover in just over 24 hours (and somehow managed to fit in going to work as well)Un putdowanble. Theres a little bit of Bridget in all of us, forget self help books, Bridget Jones' Diary has everything they have, making us realise we are not on our own in our insecurities, but also has great entertainment value. Well worth a read.
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