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Bride of Frankenstein [Blu-ray] [1935] [US Import]


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Bride of Frankenstein [Blu-ray] [1935] [US Import] + Frankenstein [Blu-ray] [1931] [Region Free] + Dracula [Blu-ray] [1931] [Region Free]
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Product details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: All Regions (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Studio: Universal Studios
  • DVD Release Date: 2 Sep 2014
  • Run Time: 75 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00L8QOYBG

Reviews

From Amazon.co.uk

It appeared, at the end of the epochal 1931 horror movie Frankenstein, that the monster had perished in a burning windmill. But that was before the runaway success of the movie dictated a sequel. In Bride of Frankenstein, we see that the monster (once again played by Boris Karloff) survived the conflagration, as did his half-mad creator (Colin Clive). This remarkable sequel, universally considered superior to the original, reunites other key players from the first film: director James Whale (whose life would later be chronicled in Gods and Monsters) and, of course, the inimitable Dwight Frye, as Frankenstein's bent-over assistant. Whale brought campy humour to the project, yet Bride is also somehow haunting, due in part to Karloff's nuanced performance. The monster, on the loose in the European countryside, learns to talk and his encounter with a blind hermit is both comic and touching. (The episode was later spoofed in Mel Brooks's Young Frankenstein.) A prologue depicts the author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley, being urged to produce a sequel by her husband Percy and Lord Byron. She's played by Elsa Lanchester, who reappears in the climactic scene as the man-made bride of the monster. Her lightning-bolt hair and reptilian movements put her into the horror-movie pantheon, despite being onscreen for only a few moments. But in many ways the film is stolen by Ernest Thesiger, as the fey Dr. Pretorious, who toasts the darker possibilities of science: "To a new world of gods and monsters!" --Robert Horton

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By C. Jarvis on 30 Jan 2003
Format: DVD
Forget 'Godfather 2'. Forget 'The Empire Strikes Back'. This is THE greatest example of a sequal surpassing the original. Coming 4 years after the original 'Frankenstein' in 1931, James Whale was originally reluctant to take on the project, but he soon changed his mind after the studio allowed him more creative freedom. No other director has ever managed to blend horror, comedy and pathos as successfully as Whale. The film features some of the most memorable scenes in film history; notably the monster's encounter with a lonely hermit ("friends - good!") and the introduction of 'The Bride'. The film has it all: superb casting, tremendous sets and make up, memorable dialogue ("To a new world of Gods and monsters") and a brilliantly effective score by Franz Waxman. Boris Karloff was surely one of the greatest actors to ever appear on film. He manages to improve on his characterisation of the monster in the first film, due mainly to the addition of dialogue ("I love dead, hate living!"), and, unlike in the first film, makes the audience feel total empathy for the monster (i.e. the monster is now the victim). Colin Clive reprises his most famous role (in what would be a tragically short career) as the reluctant Dr Frankenstein, Una O'Connor maks a wonderful addition to the cast, as the twittering, hysterical Minnie, but it is Ernest Thesiger whio steals the film with his hillarious performance ("Have a cigar. They are my only weakness") as the sinister Dr. Pretorious (the scene with him and the monster meeting for the first time is a gem). Although Elsa Lanchester appears as the bride for only about 2 minutes at the film's finale, it will be the role for which she is forever associated. Some great exras are included on this DVD including the documentary 'She's Alive!' and an audio commentary with film historian Scott MacQueen. The film is regarded as the high point of the Universal horror series and stands as a testament to the genius of James Whale.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 Sep 2004
Format: DVD
Rarely is a sequel, particularly a horror sequel, better than its predecessor, but Bride of Frankenstein (1935) easily replaced the 1931 original classic as the definitive Universal Frankenstein movie. Director James Whale did not want to do another Frankenstein movie for the most admirable of reasons, and largely because of his feelings on the matter he brought to a life a sequel that sought perfection in every discernible way and provided a much deeper and more poignant look at the monster of Frankenstein's creation - the comedic exploitation of the monster did not begin on his watch. The addition of a full-scale musical score added depth and its own emotional layers to the drama, Karloff brought amazing pathos and humanity to the creature, and Elsa Lanchester, in a few short minutes, gave the world one of the truly eternal horror images and icons in the form of the Bride of Frankenstein's Monster (which is what the film should have been called).
Most of the principal cast members of the original Frankenstein movie reprise their roles here, including Colin Clive as Frankenstein and the inimitable Boris Karloff as the monster. Mae Clarke, however, was unavailable for health reasons, and a seventeen-year-old Valerie Hobson took on the role of Elizabeth, Frankenstein's fiancée. This is a noticeable change, as Hobson played Elizabeth in a strikingly different manner. As you may have guessed, Frankenstein's monster did not actually die in the big fire that ended the first motion picture. The windmill was built over a cistern (more like a great big underground pond, if you ask me), and the monster escapes the conflagration, not before killing a couple of people and scaring Minnie, this film's version of interminable comic relief, half to death. Dr.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Gary F. Taylor on 10 Sep 2003
Format: DVD
Interestingly, Whale did not want to make a sequel to his incredibly successful 1931 FRANKENSTEIN, and bowed to studio pressure only when he received assurance of absolute control. The result is perhaps his most personal film--a strange collage of gothic horror, black humor, religious motifs, and sexual innuendo--and one of the great classics of the genre.
The plot elaborates an idea contained in the Mary Shelly novel: Frankenstein is pressured to create a mate for the monster. In Shelly's novel, the doctor eventually balks; in the film, however, he sees the experiment through due to a mix of his own obsession and the manipulations of a new character, Dr. Pretorious, and the two create the only truly iconographical monster in the film pantheon of the 1930s horror film: "The Bride," brilliantly played by Elsa Lanchester.
The cast is excellent throughout, with Colin Clive and Boris Karloff repeating their roles and Frankenstein and the monster, and Valerie Hobson an able replacement for Mae Clarke in the role of Elizabeth; Ernest Thesiger and Una O'Connor also give incredibly memorable performances as the truly strange Pretorius and the constantly hysterical maid Minnie. The art design is remarkable, and the Waxman score is justly famous. But the genius of the film lies not so much in these new and bizarre characters, in the familiar ones, or in the production values: it is in the way in which Whales delicately balances his elements and then subverts them.
FRANKENSTEIN owes much of its power to its directness--it has a raw energy that is difficult to resist, still more difficult to describe. But THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN owes its power to its complexity.
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