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Brethren: Raised By Wolves, Volume One: 1 Paperback – 1 Jan 2006


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Product details

  • Paperback: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Alien Perspective (1 Jan. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 097210982X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0972109826
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.1 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,625,267 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tony Heyes VINE VOICE on 22 Mar. 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought "Raised by Wolves" thinking it would be a rattling good read. It is, but it is marred by poor editing, historical inaccuracies and a peculiar use of English. The main character, Will Marsdale, writing in 1666, claims to have lived through the Reformation (which took place in the previous century); he is, of course, referring to Cromwell's Commonwealth. He searches London after the fire looking for the "block" in which the family home was situated. London had a medieval street pattern. "Blocks" were never a feature of English towns. He also speaks of going to "mass" at a time Catholicism was proscribed and Catholics persecuted.
The author's attempts at seventeenth century English result in over-elaborate verbiage which at times is nonsensical; for example, "I didn't think he'd be so conducive" (to what?) and "I will endeavour to try" (try to try?) Pepys never wrote like this! There are also elementary spelling mistakes - "miniscule" and "supercede" for "minuscule" and "supersede".
In the afterword to the book Hoffman speaks of having studied the subject of pirates in depth, which is commendable. Unfortunately she is too anxious to share her research with us at length and devotes several passages to aspects of pirate life we would really not know - the butchering of pigs, the origin of words and other irrelevant details. Despite these shortcomings the reader still wants to know what happens to her amoral characters. It is a pity that more pruning and checking wasn't done at the editing stage. Reading "Raised by Wolves" would have been even more enjoyable then.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mems Derynicat on 28 Dec. 2006
Format: Paperback
A great adventure story set amoung the buccaneers of the West Indies in 1667. The story of Will, heir to an English title he isn't sure he wants and Gaston, a mad Frenchman exiled to the Caribbean. Both carry heavy emotional scars which they hope to heal together. A great story with lots of fun characters and many adventures! The first of a trilogy, and I can't wait for the rest! The author clearly did a lot of research and it is very evident throughout the story.

One warning : if you don't like the idea of 2 men falling in love, you may want to give this one a miss...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Erastes on 11 Nov. 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's a big book. About 550 pages. Big in scope and ambition. Slightly too large a paperback to hold comfortably in bed or in the bath. That being said it's set in a fascinating era which isn't often written about in a fictional and accurate capacity, so I was looking forward to tackling it, although a little daunted by the size.

(It must be said that this was originally part of a trilogy, and now the author has announced that this has expanded and will be a quartet.)

At its core it follows the traditions of a typical love story - an arranged marriage which isn't consumated and a long long road in which the two protagonists learn to love and trust each other. Layered on top of this is a healthy dose of piratey action with some good secondary characters and some obvious hard research.

The author tries a little too hard, and she's guilty of "doing a Dan Brown" from time to time and info dumping hard about buccaneers and filibusters and the history behind it all - and mostly that was ok, as I didn't know a lot of it, but I also shook my head at times and said "And I should care about this over-richness of facts WHY exactly?" Too much of it and I was pulled away from the story itself. It is the same with the interractions between Gaston and Will (of which there are legion.) Granted, I admit there are boring bits in a sailor's life, but all these two seem to do is yak; chapters and chapters of it, and it got rather boring at times.

As for the actual daily life of the seaman, it was disappointingly absent for much of the book, replaced by the conversations. Only at rare points did I get the tang of salt in my nostrils and feel the rigging beneath my bare feet. They sailed around without the crew doing very much except shag and talk.
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Format: Paperback
There's no getting away from the fact that this is a long book, but for me it was well worth it as this (and the other 2 books that have currently been released in the series) has become one of my go to books whenever I'm bored and need to waste time for a few hours.

I should say that I'm generally someone that reads a book once, enjoys it and then never looks at it again so we're talking about a select group of books (Forever Amber by Kathleen Windsor and Lynn Flewelling's books being the main ones).

I found the storyline well structured and personally really enjoy all the snippets of historical insight. I also liked the animal/mythological creature analogies (although there was perhaps a little too much time spent on it at a few points).

Overall this book (and series) is well worth a look if you're into historical fiction with a m/m slant.
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