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Brave New World (Modern Classics) Mass Market Paperback – Nov 1969


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Mass Market Paperback, Nov 1969
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--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New impression edition (Nov 1969)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140010521
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140010527
  • Product Dimensions: 17.4 x 11 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (285 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 511,735 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Provoking, stimulating, shocking and dazzling." "
--Observer
""Not a work for people with tender minds and weak stomachs."
"--J.B. Priestly" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

'One of the most important books to have been published since the war' Daily Telegraph --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

137 of 144 people found the following review helpful By Michael de Waal on 3 Oct 2005
Format: Paperback
After years of hearing people refer to Brave New World - both online and in real life - I decided to read it myself and find out just what all the commotion was about. Having done so, I will share my thoughts with you.
The story is set in a future society where humans are no longer born but instead grown from embryos in huge research labs. Years of trial and error has resulted in scientists being able to produce up to 15,000 individuals from a single embryo - all of which end up being twins. Immediately they are conditioned to think and feel and act in certain ways which make society what it should be - happy, stable, strong, and united. As they sleep they are played voice recordings which, to cut a long story short, programme them into what society wants them to be. One of the many recordings being "Everyone belongs to everyone else".
In a time when humans are made in batches, pyshcologically conditioned, mentally and physically matured in a fraction of the natural time, encouraged to participate in 'errotic play' from a young age, given 'soma' (a recreational drug) to cure lows, taught to throw out old/dirty/torn clothes and buy new ones, sheltered from dirt and disease, prevented from ever becoming pregnant, told that everyone belongs to everyone else (in effect everyone has sex with everyone without thinking twice as from a young age this is taught to be perfectly natural), given medicine so that you physically look like a 20 year old all your life until around the age of 50 when you drop dead, after hearing all this you are left with many questions. Questions like 'How could it ever work?', 'What would a society of clones be like?', 'Why on earth did they do it in the first place?', and 'Is everyone truly happy?'.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 Jun 2003
Format: Paperback
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is set in a technology-rich future where test-tube babies and subconscious learning dominate people�s lives. At first, the reader is introduced to the method and capabilities of genetic engineering, where scientists are able to design babies, changing their attributes (intelligence, physical strength, etc) in order to tailor a person to a specific job. Later on, we find out about subconscious learning and the effects and uses it has on the populace. Apparently this has all been going on for generations, and so the majority of people have been bio-engineered and brainwashed.
We soon find another side of the population, people who have been left out of the technological world, people who live as themselves and with freedom. When a man decides to take a holiday there (a type of quarantined park for the savage humans), he meets one of them and manages to sneak him back to the city.
I enjoyed this novel as it involves many themes and issues including religion, the freedom and rights of people, the possibility of test-tube babies and brainwashing. I found the ending particularly strong and conclusive, not at all disappointing. Highly recommended.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By M. Torun on 4 July 2007
Format: Paperback
I read this book shortly after reading 1984 - having heard them being compared - and it definitely provided a good contrast. While Orwell's vision is dark, gloomy, filled with hate and despair, Huxley's world could almost be seen as a Utopian fantasy.

There is an overwhelming sense of comfort and "happiness" within society that is brought about through two important things: recreational drugs and psychological conditioning. Death, relationships, class differences and work do not provide worry. This is in fact what makes Huxley's work so brilliant: it portrays a Dystopia that operates so perfectly that it is disquieting rather than frightening. Because society does indeed work for the good of everyone in a hedonistic sense, the logic behind the system can only be challenged by pure human instinct, as voiced by the central character in the book: "But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin."

However, although the book brings up excellent questions regarding totalitarianism, and freedom of thought, it is somewhat lacking in story. The characters are very hard to empathise with and although the book starts with a central character, Bernard Marx, the focus shifts then to John ("the Savage"), leaving you with a sense that the novel is written for description rather than story-telling. The reader is able to get a very good mental grasp on the problems within society, but since the story isn't gripping, you finish the book feeling very detached from the characters and the world they live in.
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96 of 102 people found the following review helpful By hendrix on 11 April 2009
Format: Paperback
Society really is getting more and more like this.

This is a vision of the future where the population is controlled by subtlety and manipulation, the basic premise being that if people are too doped up to realise that they have been conned by a tiny minority who have everything then that elite can remain in charge for ever.

In Huxley's world the method of control is to program people to indulge only their most transitory and materialistic desires all of which can be fulfilled quite readily and in doing so suppress any idea that there "might be more to life than this" and this leaves the population with happy but trivial lives.

The morality of this is questioned through the introduction of an outsider to the society and his actions form the basis of the plot. To be honest I think the story isn't as involving as the world it is set in but the questions the book raised easily merit this book classic status.

It seems we are getting closer and closer to the kind of happy trivial life that Huxley forced upon his population and if you are inclined to wonder whether or not there is more to life than work and shopping then this book is probably going to be right up your street.
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