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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Japan
  • ASIN: B00005HG0Z
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. Milne on 15 May 2003
Format: Audio CD
For anyone who has only gotten into The Flaming Lips since Yoshimi or The Soft Bulletin (like me), you will not be even slightly disappointed by this album - it's every bit as good as either of their two most recent releases. While maybe not quite as polished as the two most recent albums, it's a little more zany and upbeat than the Soft Bulletin, and tracks like Bad Days and Evil will Prevail are amongst their very best. Now available for a fiver there is no excuse not to buy it. Do it now. I mean it...
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By "panchopillow" on 17 Oct. 2003
Format: Audio CD
This was the first Flaming Lips album I bought, and having bought the rest since I must say its still my favourite. To me the beauty of the Flaming Lips music is their inherent hopefullness in the face of a seemingly meaningless state of life we all have found ourselves shaing. While The Soft Bulletin deals with this in a splendor of melancholic lushness, Clouds Taste Mettalic perfectly encapsulates this continuous theme using a knowingly calculated yet almost "accidental musicalness". It takes the energy of the earlier more lo-fi albums, such as Hit To Death... and Transmissions from the Satelite Heart, while being well on the way, in terms of production and song writing to The Soft Bulletin.
Some of this energy seems to come from the guitarist Ronald, who uses his guitar in a truely unique and original way; as an intrument of many sounds rather than a chord producing stringy-box. This album is consistently brilliant. There aren't any bad songs on it, just better ones. Eeeeee.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Dec. 2001
Format: Audio CD
For all the hype (albeit deserved) that surrounded the Lips' last release, "The Soft Bulletin", this was their first great record, and remains their highest point so far. Having bought all their albums as they came out, one can clearly feel the evolution running through their records with the two previous works to "Clouds..." being lovable dress-rehearsals for this record.
It's often said, usually falsely, but "Clouds..." really is a record that sounds like no other. Dripping with heart-ache, paranoia, playful self-mocking humour and a large dose of plain weirdness, from start to finish "Clouds..." is one of the few classic albums of the 90's.
While "The Soft Bulletin" had a host of great moments it also lacks the complete soul of this record. "The Soft Bulletin" is a little more refined than "Clouds...", lacking as it does the skuzzy guitar and spine-tingling wild harmonies, but somehow it has less energy. From the gentle accoustic openings of "Braiville" to the amusing cataclysmic thrash of "Guy Who Got A Headache And Accidentally Saves The World", through the album's highpoint, "They Punctured My Yolk" (which comes across as the Beach Boys playing Spiritualized playing Suicide) up to the oddly comforting "Bad Days", the Lips' have created a record that comfortably sits alongside Suede's "Dog Man Star", REM's "Automatic For The People", the Manic's "Holy Bible", any Tindersticks or Low record and Kristin Hersh's "Hips And Makers" as a truly great record of the Second Movement of 20th Century Rock.
If you enjoy "The Soft Bulletin" then you're safe adding this to your CD collection. Ignore the one-star review above. This is as good as it gets.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan James Romley on 10 Jan. 2008
Format: Audio CD
By this stage in their career, The Lips had progressed from the lo-fi psychedelic slacker rock of early albums like Oh My Gawd! and In a Priest Driven Ambulance, into something of a loose pop band. 1991's major label debut, Hit to Death in the Future Head, and it's follow up, 1993's almost successful Transmissions from the Satellite Heart had seen the arrival of producer Dave Fridmann, as well as the on-going bombardment of revolving-door band members - incorporating early input from both Nathan Roberts and Jonathan Donahue - through to the more stable pairing of founding members Wayne Coyne and Michael Ivins, alongside their soon-to-become long-term collaborator Steven Drozd, and the introverted guitar wiz Ronald Jones. This line up would go on to create Transmissions from the Satellite Heart, and this, the twisted pop masterwork that is, Clouds Taste Metallic.

The most astounding thing about the album, for me at least, is the way in which everything just seems to work towards creating a unified whole; from the song titles and the subject matter (obsessions with space travel, science, superheroes, robots, love and death; which would all continue on the more successful albums to follow) to the overall use of instrumentation. Here, Coyne uses the acoustic guitar to flesh out the melody on a number of songs - which gives the album an individuality within the context of their discography - whilst Drozd and Fridmann add keyboards, distortion and all manner of bizarre little instrumental flourishes (including the sculpting of Jones's angular and distorted guitar riffs into a wave of atonal orchestration) to add atmosphere and counter melodies to really compliment the songs in a structural sense.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Whipelsmacker on 4 Aug. 2006
Format: Audio CD
The Flaming Lips are band that are always embracing the weird and wonderful side of life and have a great time doing so as well as constantly evolving their off kilter space age rock sound. This album is no expectation to that. The title of this album "Clouds Taste Metallic" should make that apparent.

After a punishing tour schedule to help promote "Transmissions From The Satellite Heart" the band regrouped, and on the September 19, 1995, they released this album " Clouds Taste Metallic".

Clouds Taste Metallic, is a even more accessible album than "Transmissions From The Satellite Heart " yes it may be more a accessible sound however the band have done so without discarding the spacey, trippy and more often than not bonkers lyrics that typify The Flaming Lips.

The album has songs written by the band that no other band in a month of Sundays would ever have even thought about writing. Which is what sets this band apart form other bands. Just one example of a song that has some rather, unusual lyrics

Their wasn't any snow on Christmas eve and I knew what I

Should do, I thought I'd free the animals all locked up at the zoo

That is up their with some of weirdest pieces of inspired crazed genius ideas for a song, a entire song about freeing the animals form the zoo, not because of any cruel deeds that may be going on in their but due to that fact it that their was not going to be any snow on Christmas Eve. No doubt there is a deeper meaning to this song that merely freeing animals in the zoo, but isn't the face value of the song a lot more fun?

This album also continues the tradition of long and mad as brush song titles that the band give their songs, some of these titles are as good, if not as good as the songs themselves.
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