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Brand Anarchy: Managing Corporate Reputation Paperback – 1 Mar 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: A & C Black Publishers Ltd (1 Mar 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1408157225
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408157220
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 1.8 x 20 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 433,586 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

The authors are two experienced journalists turned PR practitioners who have worked on reputation management with major organisations such as IBM and Tesco and they have interesting observatiosn to make about the challenges facing traditional media from the rapid growth of digital. There is good analysis of the different models newspapers are using to adapt to the digital age. Earl and Waddington then look at how companies manage their reputations in the digital age. Organisations are still typically broadcasting their content to their audience rather than engaging. Shifting from traditional forms of corporate communication to social forms of communication requires a change in style and tempo of language, they say. --Frank Dillon, The Irish Times

At under a tenner, the book is good value. For the PR newbie to the senior account editor, there's plenty here. While the more senior social media practitioner may know the theory the authors present, the new interviews dotted about the book give it a freshness. Overall, it's a must-read for most in the PR industry. For the majority of the PRs in the UK, this should be their main summer read. One of the better professional books of 2012. Craig McGill, The Drum
Offers a powerful manifesto for PR-schooled practitioners to assume leadership of digital and social media channels, primarily by taking greater responsibility for planning and measurement. The challenge the authors set to the PR industry is to understand the opportunity of the internet's inherent measurability, and to take advantage of it before savvy marketers from other disciplines try to eat their (new) lunch. This book is therefore recommended either as a defensive or instructional read for all B2B marketers.- Dan Roche, Head of Communications, Azzurri
There's a whole raft of books out there about managing reputations online and how brands should engage on social media, but there are a few reasons why Brand Anarchy is more relevant than most. Firstly, it's written by two guys who have been not only on the journalist and PR side of things, but at the coalface of social media campaigns. Many brands are still trapped in inertia on social media and engagement. Those brands should read Brand Anarchy and act upon their learnings. --Chris Lee, Planet Content

This book is particularly useful for 'old school,' as well as new PRs, as it is written in a style that public relations professionals will understand and relate to. They have also managed to include interviews from some heavy hitters such as Alastair Campbell, Greg Dyke and Seth Godin. If you're an experienced PR, or someone still studying to become one, this book is for you. If you are a brand manager or marketing manager who has no real dealings with your PR department- then this book is for you also. This book gets five stars from me.- Andrew Grill, London Calling
This is a really good book for anyone involved in journalism, marketing or communications. Unlike so many books on the subject, it is grounded in common sense, properly analytical and supports its propositions with instructive case studies and anecdotes. It's also well written.- Business Traveller
I would regard Brand Anarchy as one of the most useful PR books I've read- rarely turning a page without learning something new. It is not limited to those working in the field of reputation management and should be marked as essential reading for students and entry-level professionals. I recommend it to anyone wanting to further develop his or her insight into our vastly changing media landscape. On an end note, this book has reshaped the way I will plan future PR activity. --Stephen Johnson, My Digital Footprint

About the Author

Steve Earl (@mynameisearl) is a trained news journalist who went into public relations in the infancy of the Internet boom at the end of the 1990s. He has handled national and international campaigns for some of the world's largest brands. He co-founded Rainier PR, which is now Speed's technology team, in 1998, having worked for Brodeur and Weber Shandwick. Steve holds a Diploma in Newspaper Journalism from Cardiff School of Journalism, and specialised in newspaper reporting, government and media law. Stephen Waddington (@wadds) is a former journalist who moved into public relations in the early 1990s to work with British technology start-ups. He has consulted some of the world's largest technology brands and is a regular commentator on and public speaker on public relations, in particular on digital communication techniques. He sits on the PRCA Council, the CIPR Council and is a member of the CIPR s social media panel. Stephen co-founded Rainier PR, which is now Speed's technology team, in 1998, having worked for Brodeur and Weber Shandwick. Stephen holds a BEng (Hons) in Electronics from the University of Salford.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Anne-Marie Bailey on 1 May 2012
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As a Master of Arts student currently studying Public Relations, I can highly recommend Brand Anarchy as a must-read to any aspiring PR pro about to enter the working world of work.

Unlike many other text books I have had the laborious task of reading (you know the type - full of airy-fairy words that no-one ever really uses and after the first paragraph you want to cry with boredom), this book is common sense, straight talking and actually, an absolute pleasure to read.

The book paints a very clear picture about the PR landscape today, with real world examples of good (and bad) practice. The authors share invaluable insight in to the use of social media as part of an integrated campaign; a skill many employers are looking for. Trust me, as a soon-to-be-graduate and current job seeker I've seen enough job adverts to know.

To wrap up, if PR students want an on-point, accurate portrait of the industry they are about to enter in to, peppered with pearls of wisdom in surviving PR in the 21st Century, Brand Anarchy should be the latest edition to your bookshelf.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Princess Mimi on 9 Jan 2013
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I purchased this book when I was conducting a literature review for my dissertation which was on social media application for PR. I had initially expected to extract a few quotes and move on. However,after reading the first chapter, I decided to make this book my key text. I got a distinction.

After my dissertation, I decided to read the book again and I find that it is as engaging as an academic text and a general knowledge read. it is my go-to book for PR in the Digital age.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. G. Carroll VINE VOICE on 31 Mar 2012
Format: Paperback
The authors have distilled the wisdom of modern day PR practitioners into an accessible paperback. Attempts are made at populism with interviews from high profile pundits like Alistair Campbell. This veneer of populism hides the real value of the book. Brand Anarchy isn't a populist book like No Logo. Instead the value of it is for the likes of inexperienced account managers at PR agency who need to have informed opinion once they start to think about providing strategic counsel to their clients.

The book bridges traditional corporate communications with the online world and discusses some recent crises that had a substantial online component. If you work in PR make Brand Anarchy part of your holiday reading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Russell Goldsmith on 30 Aug 2012
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Brand Anarchy is a great book and relevant to anyone working in PR. Its style is very conversational and the authors talk to you in a non-patronising manner as if they were having a chat with you over a cup of coffee which makes it really easy to read.

There are some great nuggets of information and some really excellent case studies included in the book, but on many occasion I was left wanting more. Perhaps the authors are just teasing us ahead of a follow up, but the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster case study could fill an entire book in itself and so having only a couple of pages dedicated to it was a little disappointing as I was really interested in reading more about it - I doubt there are many bigger case studies to analyse over the last few years in terms of managing corporate reputation.

I did find the start of the book a little repetitive. We get the point that social media means brands and organisations are losing control of their reputations and this seemed to be discussed in many guises over the first few chapters, but once it delved into some of the case studies, it got a lot more interesting.

Given my own company, markettiers4dc featured in the book, I was naturally excited to see how we faired. However, if I'm honest, I was surprised at the lack of attention given to the power of video, both live and ondemand, on how it can influence a brand's reputation online and can engage directly with its various stakeholders. That said, I do appreciate I have a natural bias towards broadcast and do appreciate the amount that needs to be covered in a book such as this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Ramsdale on 6 Aug 2012
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Without hyperbole I can say that this book has proved invaluable from an academic perspective. I got my copy half way through my PR Masters and quite frankly, I have no idea how I managed to write essays beforehand.

It is enormously insightful yet accessible to anyone who has an interest. Since first reading the book I have become a PR practitioner and it continues to be somewhat of a `comms bible', dipping into a certain chapter after work to try and figure out the days latest comms conundrum is not unheard of.

If you are going to buy just one book in this field, I really would suggest that it is this one. If it isn't on your course reading list, read it anyway!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Craig McGill on 26 July 2012
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For those well versed in social media - those who don't need introductions to the likes of Chris Brogan, Gary Vaynerchuk, Olivier Blanchard, Guy Clapperton, Brian Solis, Rob Brown and so on, there may not be a lot new in the theory side book.

For the PR newbie (perhaps even ex-journalists crossing into PR) to the senior account director, there's plenty here. While the more senior social media practitioner may know the theory the authors present, the new interviews dotted about the book give it a freshness and exclusive content.

The UK slant from the authors works well as the book avoids for the most part talking about the standard Social Media case studies - Coke, Zappos and so on and that's very refreshing.

Similarly, the whole outlook of the book, talking about the importance of online conversations and how PRs and brands can be involved, is written from a very practical viewpoint and not the more Californian head-in-the-air attitude of many US books which are written as if everyone is already drinking the social media Kool Aid thinking it's the most important thing ever.

It's also a book not ashamed to take some potshots at some popular beliefs like pointing out why a social media strategy is not what your business needs and pointing out that the PR industry was really late to the digital engagement arena. There's certainly a few talking points in the book - no doubt deliberate to give the book reason for engagement in the digital arenas post-publication (and praise to the authors for making it so).
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