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Brahms: Symphony No.1 | Martinu: Symphony No.4 (Klaus Tennstedt) (ICA Classics: ICAC 5090)


Price: 12.26 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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Frequently Bought Together

Brahms: Symphony No.1 | Martinu: Symphony No.4 (Klaus Tennstedt) (ICA Classics: ICAC 5090) + Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 3, Bagatelles op. 126 Nos. 1, 4 & 6, Piano Sonata No. 29 'Hammerklavier'
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Product details

  • Conductor: None
  • Composer: Johannes Brahms, Bohuslav Martinu
  • Audio CD (28 Jan 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: ICA Classics
  • ASIN: B00ANUNY0K
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 292,016 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 68: I. Un poco sostenuto - Allegro13:11Album Only
Listen  2. Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 68: II. Andante sostenuto 9:07Album Only
Listen  3. Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 68: III. Un poco allegretto e grazioso 4:340.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 68: IV. Adagio - Piu andante - Allegro non troppo ma con brio16:52Album Only
Listen  5. Symphony No. 4, H. 305: I. Poco moderato 6:490.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Symphony No. 4, H. 305: II. Allegro vivo - Trio: Moderato - Allegro vivo 8:55Album Only
Listen  7. Symphony No. 4, H. 305: III. Largo10:21Album Only
Listen  8. Symphony No. 4, H. 305: IV. Poco allegro 7:020.69  Buy MP3 

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 5 Nov 2013
Format: Audio CD
Reader, sadly we never got a chance to see James Hunt put an Austin Allegro or a 1982 Cadillac Cimarron through its paces at Silverstone (with some bimbos in the back). As reparation, we have Klaus Tennstedt conducting the Radio Symphony Orchestra of Stuttgart in Brahms' First and Martinu's Fourth Symphonies.

A master is clearly at the wheel. Entrust his conceptions to a first-rate ensemble and landmark recordings would ensue. Here, the orchestra simply cannot keep up: it lacks torque and finesse. It is less than idiomatic in the first movement of Martinu's Fourth with its apian-like passages. The analogue recording is crumbly and diffuse.

There is no reason to acquire this when the likes of Symphony No. 1/Verklarte Nacht (Von Karajan) and Martinu: Memorial to Lidice; Field Mass; Symphony No. 4 are in the world.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
I am familiar with the various available recordings and this one easily tops the list 8 July 2014
By Teddy K. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I purchased this out of curiosity, knowing Tennstedt's epic work in live performances but his recordings often not as successful. At the same time, I have devoted much of the past decade to the orchestral works and chamber music of Martinu. I was so pleasantly shocked by this recording of the Fourth Symphony. I am familiar with the various available recordings and this one easily tops the list.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A Never-Ran 5 Nov 2013
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Reader, sadly we never got a chance to see James Hunt put an Austin Allegro or a 1982 Cadillac Cimarron through its paces at Silverstone (with some bimbos in the back). As reparation, we have Klaus Tennstedt conducting the Radio Symphony Orchestra of Stuttgart in Brahms’ First and Martinu’s Fourth Symphonies.

A master is clearly at the wheel. Entrust his conceptions to a first-rate ensemble and landmark recordings would ensue. Here, the orchestra simply cannot keep up: it lacks torque and finesse. It is less than idiomatic in the first movement of Martinu’s Fourth with its apian-like passages. The analogue recording is crumbly and diffuse.

There is no reason to acquire this when the likes of Symphony No. 1/Verklarte Nacht (Von Karajan) and Martinu: Memorial to Lidice; Field Mass; Symphony No. 4 are in the world.
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Tennstedt at his very best 11 July 2013
By Goosta - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This Brahms 1st reminds me that live Tennstedt often ranks right alongside Furtwangler and Karajan. I say "often" because later in his career, the early ninties, there is a slight fatigue in some of his performances, no doubt due to his dramatic decline in health at the time (cancer). I would select the Brahms 1st recently released on the LPO house label as an example. That 1st is genuinely in the manner of Furtwangler, and is certainly better than anything else since Karajan, but the slowed pace feels affected, especially in comparison to this disc.

Excluding Tennstedt, I cannot immediately recall another conductor that has produced a worthwhile Brahms performance post-Karajan. Wand is very traditional, which is good on its own terms considering the circumstances, but I often find him to be boring and confess that I only listen to his BPO performances simply to hear the BPO in German music, since the only others who have led the Vienna and Berlin orchestras have been Abbado and Rattle. Rattle is contemptible and the only fond memories I have of Abbado are his Brahms concertos with Pollini and Mullova. In fact, Tennstedt is the youngest of the only post-war Brahms conductors worthy of attention, having been born in 1928, which might as well have been five centuries ago. But the current liberal creed--it is no longer a rational liberalism--offers consolation in the synthetic, cultural generalities surrounding Dudamel (Latin heat!), Alsop, Simone Young, Chinese pianists that will never be able to understand a Beethoven sonata and whatever is left of the Modernist scum, Rattle leading the way. The stolid Thielemann is held out by Deutsche Grammophon as a saving grace.

The superior sonic quality of this recording is also very relieving. The whole range of instruments are heard clearly and there is enough room around the brass to catch their full emanation, which is so important for these symphonies but is often distorted by the disc. The Stuttgart orchestra is of high musical class, thank God.

I didn't even bother listening to the Martinu, which is at best second-rate Modernism, meaning that it is doubly pretentious. I enjoy Bartok and Schnittke, but that dosen't change the fact that Modernism in music is just a self-flagellating dirge, with barely a few exceptions elsewhere in 'Art'. So lets hope that the Tennstedt machine continues to conjure up more astonishing live performances from the depths of its vault. I would love to hear a great Beethoven Pastoral, which hasn't happened since the Kleiber one-off in 1983. Meanwhile, we wait to see which major label will feature a same-sex couple based Parsifal.
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