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Brahms Horn Trio; Franck Violin Sonata - Ashkenazy, Perlman, Tuckwell [Original recording remastered]

Vladimir Ashkenazy Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: £7.38 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY – BIOGRAPHY

“When the Sydney Symphony Orchestra acquired Vladimir Ashkenazy as its new Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor, Australian classical music fans rejoiced over their good fortune in landing an undisputed legend. Often regarded as one of the preeminent solo pianists of the present era, over the years, Ashkenazy has also acquired equally ... Read more in Amazon's Vladimir Ashkenazy Store

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Frequently Bought Together

Brahms Horn Trio; Franck Violin Sonata - Ashkenazy, Perlman, Tuckwell + Mozart: The Horn Concertos (DECCA The Originals)
Price For Both: £15.24

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Product details

  • Audio CD (19 Mar 2007)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • ASIN: B000KQGOBS
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 55,769 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. 1. Allegretto ben moderato
2. 2. Allegro- Quasi lento- Tempo 1 (Allegro)
3. 3. Recitativo - Fantasia (Ben moderato - Largamente - Molto vivace)
4. 4. Allegretto poco mosso
5. 1. Andante - Poco pił animato
6. 2. Scherzo (Allegro)
7. 3. Adagio mesto
8. 4. Finale (Allegro con brio)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By I. Giles TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
This well recorded disc from 1968 was the first time that Ashkenazy and Perlman recorded together although they had met in 1964 to play sonatas together informally at Ashkenazy's home. Barry Tuckwell had made a good impression on Ashkenazy as first horn in an early performance of the Brahms' second concerto so this disc had special significance for the three players.

..........................
Optional technical note:
As the disc is marketed with the technical levels clearly promoted, the following description may be of some help:
The mastering at 24 bits (dynamic range) and 96 kHz (frequency range) may need some explanation to be more fully understood. Every time one bit is added, the stored information doubles. Early digital recordings were made on digital recorders with only 16 bits and 48 kHz of potential information. So taking 16 bits as a notional starting size of one piece of information the following upgrade occurs:

16 bits=1; 17 bits =2, 18 bits =4, 19 bits = 8, 20 bits = 16, 21 bits = 32, 22 bits = 64, 23 bits = 128, 24 bits = 25. Mathematically therefore 24 bit processing will contain 256 times the stored information. The same is true of visual information. An 8 bit jpeg file with a fixed range of 240 colours is far inferior to a 16 bit raw or tiff file giving 61,440 colours. This difference is not possible to detect on a camera phone but is easy to see on a medium or large print with all the subtle extra shadings being very visible.

Latest research throws doubt on whether this extra information can be heard. With discs played back on reference equipment such as mine (the equivalent to a large print image), the differences can always be heard with the greatest differences being regularly apparent on the oldest recordings.
Read more ›
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Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars sound, schmound . . . 22 July 2013
By Stanley Crowe TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
. . . is my way of saying that you have to make some allowances for the sound in this recording, but that the quality and intensity of the performances are such that considerations of sound can be overridden -- which is also to say, of course, that the sound isn't bad. In fact, in the slow movement of the Brahms Trio, the engineer, Alec Rosner, achieves an excellent balance: the horn is focused, and the piano and violin tones are warm. This movement has to be one of the great movements in recorded chamber music, and I single out Perlman for playing that catches the "mesto" expression with great plangency, but Ashkenazy and Tuckwell play beautifully too. In the louder movements, the sound isn't quite so well-balanced (and it must the very devil to balance these three instruments!), with the result that the horn sounds less focused -- at times more of a pleasant blur of sound behind the other instruments. But don't let that stop you: this is a great piece, and these great players go at it with terrific energy and intensity. The romping finale is a delight,

The Franck Sonata for Violin and Piano is one of the great chamber pieces too, and this performance generates a wonderful intensity from the very start. The sound here doesn't quite do justice to the warmth with which Ashkenazy and Perlman can play (RCA does a better job with their Prokofiev sonatas), but the expressive force that's married to structural clarity here is most impressive. I still think Zimerman and Danczowska are better recorded, and perhaps they also bring more light and shade to the piece, but on its own terms, this performance by Ashkenazy and Perlman makes a strong case for a robust view of this great music
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic chamber music recording 26 Oct 2007
By Michael Birman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The Sonata for violin and piano, possibly the most intimate form of an already intimate musical genre (chamber music), was brought to its first peak of excellence by Mozart with the Sonatas he composed in Mannheim in 1778. For the first time, the dialog between violin and piano was one of equals, the violin given more to do then merely fill space. Beethoven advanced this tradition with his masterful 10 sonatas. So when Cesar Franck wrote his Sonata for violin and piano in 1886, he was nearly 64 years old and a mature composer. The weight of Mozart and Beethoven was felt by all composers who followed them.

Franck's Sonata in A major is lyrical and warm, unfettered by the rules of Classicism. All four movements are linked together by thematic material that recur in Franck's much favored cyclic form. Franck's music sounds more Germanic than French, the influence of Brahms easily apparent in this relatively somber work. A more beautifully played Sonata is hard to imagine. The youthful Vladimir Ashkenazy and Itzhak Perlman play with passion and conviction (this was recorded well before the interpretive laziness that mars performances from their later years). They have absorbed this work and it shows. The opening Allegretto is particularly brilliant. The lovely melancholy of the third movement Recitativo-fantasia is played with elegaic finesse. This is exemplary playing in all respects, both musicians exhibiting the music's varied dynamics with great delicacy.

Brahms composed his Trio for violin, horn and piano in E-flat major, Op.40 in 1865 when he'd retired to the dark beauty of the Black Forest, making his headquarters in Baden-Baden. The Trio is mellow and expansive, with moments of both lyrical beauty and resigned melancholy. Barry Tuckwell plays the french horn with great subtlety in his dynamic shadings, his tone often somber and warmly burnished. His playing is especially lovely in the profound and sad third movement Adagio mesto. The horn part can be played by both a cello and a viola, but neither string instrument approaches the horn's beauty in this piece. Both Ashkenazy and Perlman partner Tuckwell splendidly. The sound of this 96kHz - 24-bit remastered 1969 recording is as warm and full as analog records used to sound. Comparing the original vinyl pressing to this CD, the better sound emanated from the CD. This, undoubtedly, is a result of the superior remastering of Universal's The Originals series. It is not usually the case.

These two important fruits of the Romantic era are beautifully played in performances that are unlikely to be soon bettered. If you are amenable to chamber music, this disc is most strongly recommended for its dark and lyrical beauty and as a portent of Brahm's future autumnal greatness.

Mike Birman
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Full of expression 4 April 2008
By Peter Chordas - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
This Franck piece flows beautifully from start to finish. The combined clarity and understanding between both Ashkenazy and Perlman generates complete balance in phrasing and smoothness in the lyricism. Perlman captures the lilting drama while the piano adds softness and a dream quality to it. I have never heard this piece better performed.

The Brahms also has a "swept off thy feet" sensation to it. A bit more energetic, it also flows beautifully and the french horn played by Tuckwell is another added delight.

To those who may not be familiar with classical chamber music, these pieces are a bit more cerebral than say Mozart or Haydns' music whose beauty and genius is often in the simplicity with a melody and themes that may be easier to follow. The formula here is more complex. But it is so full of emotion and expression that this coupled recording is really beautiful to listen to. If the first time through doesn't hook you, give it a few more times - it will.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An exciting début recording for this group of players from 1968 20 Aug 2013
By I. Giles - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This well recorded disc from 1968 was the first time that Ashkenazy and Perlman recorded together although they had met in 1964 to play sonatas together informally at Ashkenazy's home. Barry Tuckwell had made a good impression on Ashkenazy as first horn in an early performance of the Brahms' second concerto so this disc had special significance for the three players.

..........................
Optional technical note:
As the disc is marketed with the technical levels clearly promoted, the following description may be of some help:
The mastering at 24 bits (dynamic range) and 96 kHz (frequency range) may need some explanation to be more fully understood. Every time one bit is added, the stored information doubles. Early digital recordings were made on digital recorders with only 16 bits and 48 kHz of potential information. So taking 16 bits as a notional starting size of one piece of information the following upgrade occurs:

16 bits=1; 17 bits =2, 18 bits =4, 19 bits = 8, 20 bits = 16, 21 bits = 32, 22 bits = 64, 23 bits = 128, 24 bits = 25. Mathematically therefore 24 bit processing will contain 256 times the stored information. The same is true of visual information. An 8 bit jpeg file with a fixed range of 240 colours is far inferior to a 16 bit raw or tiff file giving 61,440 colours. This difference is not possible to detect on a camera phone but is easy to see on a medium or large print with all the subtle extra shadings being very visible.

Latest research throws doubt on whether this extra information can be heard. With discs played back on reference equipment such as mine (the equivalent to a large print image), the differences can always be heard with the greatest differences being regularly apparent on the oldest recordings. These observations are made as I hear them following on from direct comparisons made between each earlier and re-mastered disc as reviewed. Readers using different playback equipment may have different listening experiences.
.......................

The result on this disc is the expected increased 'presence' with added internal clarity and detail plus dynamic and frequency response compared to the original CD releases.

Moving on to the performances, it will not come as a surprise to hear that these are particularly vibrant performances. All three players are naturally outward going and that is how these recordings sound. The violin sonata is a more muscular vision than that provided by Kyung Wha Chung and Radu Lupu on another Decca compilation for instance. Perlman's tone is more cutting and powerful than the sweeter Chung and Ashkenazy is far more dramatic than Lupu. In effect one could arguably summarise these two performances as delivering the masculine and feminine sides of the music.

The horn sonata is also a very forthright performance with the slow movement rising to an impassioned climax and with the final movement being exhilaratingly fleet. No mention in the notes is made of Brahms' requirement that this music should be played on a natural horn for the special tonal characteristics that the composer wished to promote. That changes the nature of the music considerably and there are now several fine versions to choose from that conform to that wish. Nevertheless, Tuckwell makes an exciting experience of the music on his modern horn even though the scale of the interpretation is inevitably enlarged.

This has been a much liked disc for many years and justifies its re-mastering in the 'originals' series. Both performances and recordings are very fine and deserve to be given serious consideration as a purchase option.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars sound, schmound . . . 22 July 2013
By Stanley Crowe - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
. . . is my way of saying that you have to make some allowances for the sound in this recording, but that the quality and intensity of the performances are such that considerations of sound can be overridden -- which is also to say, of course, that the sound isn't bad. In fact, in the slow movement of the Brahms Trio, the engineer, Alec Rosner, achieves an excellent balance: the horn is focused, and the piano and violin tones are warm. This movement has to be one of the great movements in recorded chamber music, and I single out Perlman for playing that catches the "mesto" expression with great plangency, but Ashkenazy and Tuckwell play beautifully too. In the louder movements, the sound isn't quite so well-balanced (and it must the very devil to balance these three instruments!), with the result that the horn sounds less focused -- at times more of a pleasant blur of sound behind the other instruments. But don't let that stop you: this is a great piece, and these great players go at it with terrific energy and intensity. The romping finale is a delight,

The Franck Sonata for Violin and Piano is one of the great chamber pieces too, and this performance generates a wonderful intensity from the very start. The sound here doesn't quite do justice to the warmth with which Ashkenazy and Perlman can play (RCA does a better job with their Prokofiev sonatas), but the expressive force that's married to structural clarity here is most impressive. I still think Zimerman and Danczowska are better recorded, and perhaps they also bring more light and shade to the piece, but on its own terms, this performance by Ashkenazy and Perlman makes a strong case for a robust view of this great music
5.0 out of 5 stars Franck and Brahms CD 13 Jun 2013
By Liza Jane - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I'm so glad I ordered this CD from Amazon. I love listening to this CD of Franck's Sonnata for Violin & Piano, and Brahms Trio for Violin, Horn & Piano. The CD arrived soon after I placed the order, and is in perfect condition.
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