Quantity:1
Brahms: Ein Deutsches Req... has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by zoverstocks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Buy with confidence from a huge UK seller with over 3 million feedback ratings, all items despatched next day directly from the UK. All items are quality guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Brahms: Ein Deutsches Requiem Live

4.5 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

Price: £8.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
35 new from £5.96 7 used from £5.18
£8.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

  • Brahms: Ein Deutsches Requiem
  • +
  • Ein deutsches Requiem op. 45: Klavierauszug
Total price: £15.00
Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Orchestra: Berliner Philharmoniker
  • Conductor: Sir Simon Rattle
  • Audio CD (5 Mar. 2007)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Live
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B000MTEDIE
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,750 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. I. Selig sind, die da Leid tragen (Ziemlich langsam)
  2. II. Denn alles Fleisch es ist wie Gras (Langsam, marschmässig)
  3. III. Herr, lehre doch mich (Andante moderato)
  4. IV. Wie lieblich sind deine Wohnungen (Mässig bewegt)
  5. V. Ihr habt nun Traurigkeit (Langsam)
  6. VI. Denn wir haben hie keine bleibende Statt (Andante)
  7. VII. Selig sind die Toten (Feierlich)

Product Description

Product Description

RATTLE SIMON / BERLIN P. O.

BBC Review

Brahms was in his forties before he completed his first symphony, and goodness knows what other symphonic achievements he might have had, had he not been cowered into silence by the ghost of Beethoven for so many years. Lucky for us, though, that he wasn't similarly scared off writing large choral works. It is extraordinary to think that this Requiem was his first major composition, written when he was only in his thirties, such is its physical and emotional magnitude. Happily, on the whole, Simon Rattle and the Berlin Radio Choir have done it justice with an arresting and powerful recording.

Brahms claimed he could have named this his Human Requiem, with its focus on comforting the living, and this is particularly apt for the first movement. The music comforts, calms, suggests hope, whilst still acknowledging the tragedy of death, and under Simon Rattle's baton the choir and orchestra have got to the heart of it; they bring out all the nuances of emotion, and one feels they really understand it. Strangely, however, the second movement Denn alles Fleisch, es wie in Gras proves to be the one blip in the performance. Whatever connection the performers felt in the previous movement has gone and, despite the drama in the score, it sounds almost one-dimensional. Thank goodness, then, for the baritone Thomas Quasthoff's soulful Herr, lehre doch mich. The chorus and orchestra take his lead, and they keep up the emotional momentum through the balming Wie lieblich sind deine Wohnungen. There is more soloist pleasure to be had in the exquisite "Ihr habt nun Traurigkeit"; the fact that Brahms was prompted to write the Requiem upon the death of his mother adds especial importance to this fifth movement, as it is only here that a mother's comfort is explicitly referred to. Dorothea Roschmann's beautiful, rich soprano voice delivers the impassioned tenderness the listener craves. The sense of connection between musicians and music continues for the remainder of the Requiem so, all in all, this is a great performance and I think we can forgive Rattle his second movement wobble. --Charlotte Gardner

Find more reviews on the BBC Music website Links off site

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I'm not sure I've ever heard the Deutsches Requiem sound more Brahmsian. That may seem an odd remark, but many recordings make of it a sui generis piece, living in a funerary world of its own. But I hear in this performance from Rattle and the Berliners direct lines into the symphonies and the concertos that I'm seldom so conscious of with other performers. It's there in the melodic and rhythmic phrasing, in the orchestral textures, especially of the woodwind, and in the integration of choir and orchestra.

Like his recent Schubert Great C Major, this is in many ways an old fashioned performance. Tempi are broader than we get from more `authentic' modernists like John Eliot Gardiner, Roger Norrington and the like, textures are richer and warmer, it comes through as an altogether grander work. Brahms determined to write a very untraditional Requiem, not just in his choice of texts but in his focus on the bereaved who are left behind rather than the traditional prayers for the dead themselves. It was, after all, written soon after his mother's death and the central movement, `Ihr habt nun Traurigkeit', is a tender and moving memorial to her. Rattle reflects this humanity in his performance: it is perhaps the most humanist German Requiem since Kempe's wonderful performance with the same orchestra.

I don't want to leave the impression that this is an over-sombre, stodgy performance, though. Far from it. Those moments when the clouds clear and the sun comes out and the music starts to stir with life, movement and liveliness suit Rattle's ability to lift and energise a rhythm well. The fourth movement becomes almost a lilting waltz at times, a heavenly dance if you like.
Read more ›
Comment 65 of 65 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Rattle is going back to a very classical ideal in this recording, it's reminding me of the Klemperer recording. In times where the "authentic" sound is the aim in many recordings, this is not aiming for that. Here is a classical balance and a natural flow.

Rundfunkchor Berlin is singing with an outstanding perfection where every syllable is heard. Berliner Philharmoniker is the perfect orchestra for this with it's classical heritage.
Among the soloists I would like to mention Quasthoff, his voice is carrying the message right to the heart.
Comment 11 of 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Bacchus TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 April 2012
Format: Audio CD
I am a bit of a hot and cold admirer of Brahms's German Requiem. It has its moments of excitement which in the wrong hands can become stodgy and other moments of sheer rapture that in the wrong hands can sound a bit saccharine. There are bits that can sound well, boring.

I have not heard every recording of this work (who has?), including the Klemperer recording which many regard as the touchstone recording. However, I have three other recordings (Gardiner, Kempe and Ansermet) with which to make a comparison with Rattle's recording.

To start with positives. I think that Rattle gave the work a wonderfully flowing performance. I do not find it at all stodgy. I think that the tempi chosen are sound. Overall, he takes just two minutes longer than Gardiner and on some movements, he is swifter. The performance also reveals plenty of fascinating orchestral details I did not hear in other recordings. So many times in the recording, I was truly transported by the gorgeous noises emanating from my loudspeakers. The choir too, produce an excellent sound. They make it sound so easy (and believe me, it is not an easy sing). I don't think that the singers themselves are quite as good as the ones Gardiner has in the Monteverdi Choir but that is a minor quibble. I like also Thomas Quastoff's solo passages. His diction is superb and I like the quality of his voice. It is a performance which is cool rather than emotional and dramatic but this is not necessarily a criticism.

However, I did tend to find that the overall performance was rather cool at times and I did feel that the search for a flowing style did rob the dramatic bits of a bit of Old Testament fury. I also had some issues with Dorothea Roshmann's soprano solo.
Read more ›
Comment 4 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought this version after reading lots of reviews. It is a work I love and have sung a number of times. This performance really does the work justice and brings out the profound emotions of the work, both in the quiet sensitive passages and in the powerful climaxes. Highly recommended.
Comment 5 of 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I first heard a track from this particular recording on Classic FM, and it took me ages to track it down. The Berlin Phil and Simon Rattle make this an absolute must have recording of the German Requiem to have in your collection. It's certainly my favourite.
Comment 4 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A truly uplifting recording of one of Brahms' most outstanding compositions. A proper requiem for the comfort of the bereaved, and Rattle does it justice with a terrific ensemble underpinned by some great recording engineering. If you only ever buy one recording of this, this is worth serious consideration.
Comment 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
There's been an unfortunate tendency in recent years to pull Brahms back into the puritanical vacuum of original-instrument 'authenticity'. This does Brahms no favours (as it happens it does Bach no favours either, but I guess that's for another time). What we have here is Brahms as if he were contemporary with Wagner rather than the Witch-finder General. Which he was. Big contrasts, a tendency to blend orchestra and voices in more than a hint of unending melos rather than quasi-symmetrical answering phrases, and a final movement (Selig sind die Toten) which sounds exactly as it should - a prefiguring of the contrapuntal chromatics of Parsifal. Simon Rattle's mid-noughties Brahms symphony cycle with the BPO for EMI was really good; this is even better.
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback