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Bradley Wiggins: My Time: An Autobiography Hardcover – 8 Nov 2012


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Bradley Wiggins: My Time: An Autobiography + 21 Days to Glory: The Official Team Sky Book of the 2012 Tour de France
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Yellow Jersey; 1st Edition edition (8 Nov 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 022409212X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0224092128
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 3 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (303 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 26,943 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Revealing and compelling... Events that we thought we’d seen from every angle are given a fresh twist" (Tim Lewis Observer)

"Like the man himself, captivating" (Simon Yeend Daily Express)

"We get raw thrilling Wiggins, as if we’re his mates in the pub as he tells us how he won the Tour de France and Olympic gold for afters" (Nick Pitt Sunday Times)

"Listening to Bradley Wiggins is a pleasure unmatched in British sport. Whether the topic is gearing or psychology, Wiggins speaks in paragraphs of pure practical wisdom, liberally peppered with swearwords... The latest reflections from the sage of Kilburn ring true and clear" (Rowland Manthorpe Sunday Telegraph)

"It bristles with details of his sinew-straining dedication and the almost maniacal attention to detail that powers any athlete to legend status" (Charlotte Heathcote Sunday Express)

"The most extraordinary feat of the most extraordinary year in British sport ... captured" (Steven Howard The Sun)

"It is the details that linger: the two-hour training sessions in a shed heated to 40C; the fanaticism about losing weight" (Sarah Crompton Daily Telegraph)

"Naturally there are a plethora of autobiographies from Olympic stars... Given his unrivalled success this year along with his blunt honesty and sharp wit, Wiggins’ book promises to be the most interesting read of them all" (Rowing and Regatta)

"A straight first-hand account of Wiggins’s path to Tour and Olympic glory" (Cycle Sport)

"Sporting hero Bradley Wiggins opens up about life on and off the wheels in this candid book" (Asda magazine)

"2012 belongs to one cyclist more than any other, Bradley Wiggins. His autobiography, My Time, like Pendleton's much helped by the choice of co-writer, in Wiggins' case the superlative William Fotheringham. Wiggins' story is unsurprisingly dominated by the account his book provides of what it took to become the first British rider to win the Tour de France. But in the course of telling the tale his image as an everyday hero is absolutely confirmed with all the necessary detail and insight both cynics and fans would require. He is truly not only a great athlete but a great guy too. No BBC hoopla or appointment at the palace is required to confirm this well-deserved status" (Mary Perryman Huffington Post UK)

"charts his incredible feats this year" (Aline Reed Sunday Express)

"An absorbing read for cycling aficionados and newcomers alike, delving into most levels of Wiggins existence – cyclist, team leader, husband, father, son – during the most important years of his life" (Road Cycling)

"Covers not only the highs of the last two seasons but the lows" (London Cyclist)

"In the course of telling the tale, his image as an everyday hero is absolutely confirmed with all the necessary detail and insight both cynics and fans would require" (Mark Perryman Morning Star)

"Conveys the most engaging personality of this almost comically unpretentious bloke, who never thought that Tour winners came from Kilburn" (Geoffrey Wheatcroft New Statesman)

"Compelling and often emotional account... Outspoken, honest, intelligent and fearless, Wiggins has been hailed as the people’s champion" (Yorkshire Post)

"A genuinely up-lifting read" (Alan Pattullo The Scotsman)

"Engaging" (Malachy Clerkin Irish Times)

"My Time conveys the most engaging personality of this almost comically unpretentious bloke, who never thought that Tour de France winners came from Kilburn" (Geoffrey Wheatcroft New Statesmen)

"There is plenty of material for cycling aficionados … but his story is also of interest to the general reader" (Lewis Jones Spectator)

"Who could resist finding out more about the sideburned new superstar of British cycling" (Daily Telegraph)

"Euphoria does not last forever and so the race is always on to ensure that the books is read for those keen to know of to re-live the spine tingling moments of triumph. My Time is not at all the worst of this kind of output. Indeed, it might be among the best...there is plenty of fascinating detail" (Alison Rudd The Times)

"Give sports fans a glimpse into what it takes to win gold" (Closer)

"Fascinating...it covers most levels of Wiggins existence – cyclist, team leader, husband, father, son – during the most important years of his life, with the candour that has become his trademark...co-written by Guardian sports writer, William Fotheringham, who helps to tell the story in the direct but eloquent tone that Wiggins watchers will recognise countless radio and television interviews. It is an absorbing read that covers Wiggins’ career from his departure from Garmin to his latest Olympic success. Cycling fans will relish the horse’s mouth accounts of the triumphs they have watched unfold this year, while newcomers to the sport, attracted by the man’s performances this year, both on and off the bike, should find more to enjoy" (Timothy John Road Cycling UK)

"If you love cycling, this makes a very welcome change from the rather saturated market of ‘cyclist doping confessions'" (Cycling UK)

"What makes the book special for me is the love of cycling that comes through. His passion for the sport, for its history, his awareness of where he stands in the pantheon of Lycra-clad heroes, and his inability to truly comprehend his achievements all come across in waves. And in typical Wiggins fashion, he doesn’t dodge the difficult bits. He talks openly about the latest drugs scandal and the unwelcome role of moral enforcer which has been forced onto him by his newfound standing as Tour winner" (Freewheeling France (blog))

Book Description

A full-length, in-depth and intimate memoir by Bradley Wiggins charting his journey to become the first Briton ever to win the Tour de France and his country's most decorated Olympian.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. Hamilton on 26 Dec 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Let's be honest - if you're a cycling fan, you will have already had an opinion of Wiggins formed before the events of 2012 unfolded.

In the run up to this year he could be talented, wayward, self deprecating, vaguely self-destructive, passionate, humble, arrogant, and everything else in between. Compared with the other British guys on the scene, he was always a bit of an enigma. He could at times display the passion and eloquence of David Millar, the sheer bloody single mindedness of Mark Cavendish, and - periodically - the humility and affability of Sir Chris Hoy.

Like many, I saw him crash out of the 2011 Tour and thought "Well that's a relief" - his heart didn't seem in it, and Team Sky looked on course to miss their stated goal of winning the premier cycle race within 5 years. Then, early on in the season, things were obviously right at Sky, and more importantly right at the point where it mattered; between Wiggins' ears.

The Tour de France 2012 was, if we're honest, a bit dull - Team Sky just shut the thing down after the first week. But this actually made it more intriguing; it was obviously a team effort, a well oiled machine working at 100%. Perhaps it was also a watershed? The point where the big personalities of old dominated the race through pyramid teams (Merckx, Hainault, Armstrong, etc).

Towards the end of the Tour, it was apparent that Sky could have chosen either Froome or Wiggins to win if they wished.

This is, in essence, what this book is about. Although notionally centred on Wiggins, it really is a narrative of how Team Sky and British Cycling came to dominate 2012 on the road, and on the track.
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42 of 48 people found the following review helpful By A. Rowe on 13 Nov 2012
Format: Hardcover
I really enjoyed this book, and would recommend it to fans of cycling, and to readers who would like to know more about the psychological issues that can affect elite athletes.
I believe Bradley recounted his experiences to William Fotheringham (who `ghosted' the book), and a very personable and understandable character comes to light. That's not to say that Bradley comes across as a deity, as he certainly has his struggles. However he is very honest about what drives him, what his weaknesses are, and this makes his story all the more engaging.
My Time is a flowing read, and the observations and insights really allow the (sometimes) technical world of cycling to become much easier to grasp and understand.
Personally, I particularly enjoyed the anecdotes about the first year of Team Sky, and the frankness with which Bradley admitted he often struggled with the pressure of suddenly being a `Leader', and how he coped (or didn't) with what this entailed.
The book plots a great passage from those dark days of self-doubt to the exultation of Bradley's entrance to the Champs Elysees. Throughout the book, the scale of the dedication, hard graft, and ultimate achievement of winning the Tour really hits home, and this book is an excellent souvenir for those who lived and breathed every KM of this year's Tour.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By ben144 on 16 Jan 2013
Format: Hardcover
Poorly written and repetitive; I guess it is impressive that they got it published in such a short time, but it would have been better to wait and actually concentrate on getting the content up to scratch. There is clearly a good book in there trying to get out. This feels like a bit of a cash-in on a great year for BW.
It leaves lots of questions unanswered - for example, there are hints that BWs relationship with Chris Froome is not great, but this is never really dealt with openly (for obvious reasons, but we have come to expect a bit more clarity from modern 'warts and all' autobiographies).
Ultimately, most decent books take some considerable time to write, so it is hardly surprising that this is no literary masterpiece. However, with such rich subject matter, this just feels like a missed opportunity.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brian Dickson on 26 Oct 2013
Format: Paperback
I started reading this after enjoying Tyler Hamilton's book on drugs and Lance Armstrong (The secret race) which was a revealing account of the skullduggery behind the cycling world. Recommended. However this book by Bradley Wiggens is one of the worst I have tried to read in a while. It appears to be ghostwritten but reads like one long sentence of chat taped from an interview. It badly needs editing. Don't bother- I wanted to like this but gave up after the first 50 pages or so!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Graham Lindsay on 5 Aug 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A bit dull really.i expected more humour from Sir Bradley.
He's a national hero for 2012 & his Olympic exploits,I expected more personality & inspiration.
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30 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Smart Mart 13 on 24 Nov 2012
Format: Hardcover
A great, inspirational insight into a true British hero.
So why only 2 stars?
A book that is a pleasure to read is hard to put down. This is a struggle to pick up.
It's been rushed into production for the Christmas market. Lots of repetitions, not only from chapter to chapter but even within the same paragraph.
Poorly written, but then William Fotheringham wrote it so why am I surprised. I've not enjoyed his style of writing in any of his books.
If it gets re-written for the second edition (perhaps by an outstanding writer like Daniel Coyle) then this would be a 5* with no hesitation.
Worth reading because it's Brad's story, but it could have been so much better.
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