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Boy In Da Corner [VINYL]


Price: £23.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Music

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Photos

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Biography

Pretty much everyone in Britain can tell you where they were the night of the 2012 Olympics’ opening ceremony. But only one person can say they were onstage in a specially-made ‘E3’ baseball jacket singing “Bonkers” to a TV audience estimated at nine hundred million.

“I was ready for the actual performance, so I just enjoyed it”, Dizzee Rascal ... Read more in Amazon's Dizzee Rascal Store

Visit Amazon's Dizzee Rascal Store
for 25 albums, 9 photos, discussions, and more.

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Boy In Da Corner [VINYL] + Maths and English + Showtime
Price For All Three: £31.90

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Product details

  • Vinyl (21 July 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: XL
  • ASIN: B00009WVWT
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 77,549 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Sittin’ Here
2. Stop Dat
3. I Luv U
4. Brand New Day
5. 2 Far (Feat. Wiley)
6. Fix Up, Look Sharp
7. Cut ‘Em Off
8. Hold Ya Mouf (feat. God’s Gift)
9. Round We Go (Ain’t No Love)
10. Jus’ A Rascal
11. Wot U On?
12. Jezebel
13. Seems 2 Be
14. Live O
15. Do It

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By J. W. Bassett on 25 Aug. 2003
Format: Audio CD
Anytime an album like ‘Boy In Da Corner’ arrives it seems to cause no end of consternation amongst the music press. Always happy to pigeonhole artists for the sake of marketing, hacks seem to struggle when credible UK ‘urban’ music arrives. It happened with The Streets and now Dizzee Rascal looks set to suffer the same ‘Garage’ tag. Make no mistake; this is no garage album (whatever that means anyway). Like Mike Skinner before him, 18-year-old Dylan Mills has taken the basics of a genre that is currently laying face down in the water and transformed it into something far, far more intriguing. Where Skinner took games of darts and the midnight munchies as his inspiration so Mills takes estate violence and teenage pregnancies as his.
This is a far darker proposition than ‘Original Pirate Material’ though. Dizzee sees himself as an outsider; the opening track makes this abundantly clear. On the opening line of the opening track, ‘Sittin Here’ Dizzee tells us, “I’m sitting here, I ain’t saying much, I just think / and my eyes don’t move left or right, they just blink.” For 18 years, Mills sounds remarkably mature, and sounds almost like an elder statesman of the streets when he whispers memories of playing football in the streets, before he yields to the feeling that there will be, “no positive change.” This feeling of hopelessness rears its ugly head again on ‘Brand New Day’. Over a dizzying wind chime sample, Dizzee reminisces, “We used to fight with kids from other estates / now eight millimetres settle debates.”
Though just shy of an hour in length, Dizzee manages to cram in a huge assortment of topics.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 July 2003
Format: Audio CD
When I first heard the name Dizzee Rascal, i believed it would be the name of a musical disaster! After hearing 'I Luv U' almost a year ago, I was completely blown away.
On his debut LP, Dizzee Rascal 'spits' his hard,and raw lyrics over standard uk garage beats, and the mixture fits together well. His style is very unique, as i have never heard anyone use a squeaky teenage voice to describe such real to life situations.
"If that girl know where u stay that's poor/Some wh**e bangin on your door, wot for?/Pregnant? Wot you talkin bout? Be sure/ 15 she's underage that's raw!" -I Luv U
Boy In Da Corner, from start to finish, is a great example of how the British music industry is evolving. the only question left is, how is Dizzee Rascal going to top this nex time round?
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 April 2004
Format: Audio CD
As a huge garage lover since about 1995 I've seen the scene change forbetter and worse. This change to a so called 'grimey garage'had thepotential to kill off what was fast becoming a commercial scene. As alover of hip hop as well I've found parallels between the two scenes andthat parallel is Dizzee Rascal. It's not hip hop and not garage but thegreat thing about garage is it's not a genre it's sub sections inside agenre best summed up by Wiley in his track 'what do u call it'. This albumis fantastic, sometimes very simple but creative and I think a lot ofAmercians have started to over complicate their music and their lyricshave become predictable as in they're from the ghetto etc. We know thatbut what dizzee does here is not tell people of his background but roleplays with situations that make you realise where he's from. I was bornand lived in the East End (Bow) and this sound is the London sound, the UKsound that is unique. Dizzee's work shows flair and genius, his word playand beats all compliment each other. 'I luv u' shows awareness ofsituation and a word play that is ingenius. The album is entertaining,thoughtful and his style and he will be huge in the US because they arecrying out for a change, whereas here we are always changing and dizzee isthe forerunner. What do you call it? I call it Dizzee.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Andy Semak on 25 July 2003
Format: Audio CD
Dizzee Rascal to those intrested in the largely underground UK garage scene is already been tipped as the future. He has the expectations of thousands on his young shoulders.
Dizzee's vocal style is a removed version of Jamaican toasting, the result of a journey through the UK's own rap history and, most significantly, the rave scene's trajectory through hardcore to drum 'n' bass and UK Garage.The album, which was recorded over the last two years, maps out Dizzee's rites of passage from boyhood to, albeit young, manhood.
And the lyrics, as the album title spells out, are speckled with the kind of things a boy who's working things out for himself is likely to have going through his head.
The result is we get an insight into a many sided person, rather than a one dimensional pop personality. The thinking-out-loud observations are sometimes sensitive, sometimes brutal, sometimes funny, sometimes cliche and sometimes pensive.
On 'Brand New Day' a mournful Dizzee laments the rise of violence in his neighbourhood, while on 'Jus A Rascal' he reveals a playful humour.
On 'Jezebel' he recounts an anti-single motherhood moral tale that sits somewhat self-righteously next to 'Cut 'em Off', in which he declares himself "your worst nightmare" before spelling out his quest for domination via postured MC bravado.
But elsewhere we find vulnerability: "Sometimes I feel there's not a lot to smile about so I frown...sleep tight, everything will be all right, at the end of the night will be the day, just pray that you see it."
The message may be contradictory, but the intention is descriptive rather than prescriptive and reflects Dizzee's desire to create a balance between the positive and negative.
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