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Boy In Da Corner
 
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Boy In Da Corner

21 July 2003 | Format: MP3

7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 5.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:05
30
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3:40
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3
4:05
30
4
4:00
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3:07
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3:44
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3:53
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2:55
30
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4:13
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3:39
30
11
4:50
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12
3:36
30
13
3:46
30
14
3:35
30
15
4:06
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Product details

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Anytime an album like ‘Boy In Da Corner’ arrives it seems to cause no end of consternation amongst the music press. Always happy to pigeonhole artists for the sake of marketing, hacks seem to struggle when credible UK ‘urban’ music arrives. It happened with The Streets and now Dizzee Rascal looks set to suffer the same ‘Garage’ tag. Make no mistake; this is no garage album (whatever that means anyway). Like Mike Skinner before him, 18-year-old Dylan Mills has taken the basics of a genre that is currently laying face down in the water and transformed it into something far, far more intriguing. Where Skinner took games of darts and the midnight munchies as his inspiration so Mills takes estate violence and teenage pregnancies as his.
This is a far darker proposition than ‘Original Pirate Material’ though. Dizzee sees himself as an outsider; the opening track makes this abundantly clear. On the opening line of the opening track, ‘Sittin Here’ Dizzee tells us, “I’m sitting here, I ain’t saying much, I just think / and my eyes don’t move left or right, they just blink.” For 18 years, Mills sounds remarkably mature, and sounds almost like an elder statesman of the streets when he whispers memories of playing football in the streets, before he yields to the feeling that there will be, “no positive change.” This feeling of hopelessness rears its ugly head again on ‘Brand New Day’. Over a dizzying wind chime sample, Dizzee reminisces, “We used to fight with kids from other estates / now eight millimetres settle debates.”
Though just shy of an hour in length, Dizzee manages to cram in a huge assortment of topics.
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Format: Audio CD
It's nearly been 10 years since Dizzee Rascal burst on to the scene and his newer material is being met with grim faces and even grimmer comments from his fans. His own style of pop with an urban twist, aided by production from some of the biggest DJs and producers around at the moment, comes as a stark contrast to this gritty, discomforting debut which originally propelled Dizzee and the entire grime genre into the limelight.

The urban scene of the UK has changed massively in the UK, and the music has too. It is rare to hear such an edgy commentary of council estate life and times from an artist with unashamedly brazen stories of violence, crime and sex. It's easy to dismiss these topics as the vile thoughts of an out-of-sync teen but you would be dismissing these at your own peril. The early grime painted a clear picture of the social issues in those times and Boy In Da Corner steps out farther than most by covering a wide spectrum viewed through youthful eyes. But it's not only the lyrics but also the production that make sure that you can never sit comfortably in your seat when you're listening to this.

It's the fact that what you're listening to is real, true and still happening that sends tingles down your spine and encourage you to listen on. Despite the social changes we've seen and the changes in the type of music we're now seeing coming from the same sort of areas Dizzee grew up in, this album still acts as an accurate periscope, peering over the wall into a way of life that has very much been swept under the rug and out of view by society.
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By A Customer on 14 July 2003
Format: Audio CD
When I first heard the name Dizzee Rascal, i believed it would be the name of a musical disaster! After hearing 'I Luv U' almost a year ago, I was completely blown away.
On his debut LP, Dizzee Rascal 'spits' his hard,and raw lyrics over standard uk garage beats, and the mixture fits together well. His style is very unique, as i have never heard anyone use a squeaky teenage voice to describe such real to life situations.
"If that girl know where u stay that's poor/Some wh**e bangin on your door, wot for?/Pregnant? Wot you talkin bout? Be sure/ 15 she's underage that's raw!" -I Luv U
Boy In Da Corner, from start to finish, is a great example of how the British music industry is evolving. the only question left is, how is Dizzee Rascal going to top this nex time round?
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By A Customer on 26 April 2004
Format: Audio CD
As a huge garage lover since about 1995 I've seen the scene change forbetter and worse. This change to a so called 'grimey garage'had thepotential to kill off what was fast becoming a commercial scene. As alover of hip hop as well I've found parallels between the two scenes andthat parallel is Dizzee Rascal. It's not hip hop and not garage but thegreat thing about garage is it's not a genre it's sub sections inside agenre best summed up by Wiley in his track 'what do u call it'. This albumis fantastic, sometimes very simple but creative and I think a lot ofAmercians have started to over complicate their music and their lyricshave become predictable as in they're from the ghetto etc. We know thatbut what dizzee does here is not tell people of his background but roleplays with situations that make you realise where he's from. I was bornand lived in the East End (Bow) and this sound is the London sound, the UKsound that is unique. Dizzee's work shows flair and genius, his word playand beats all compliment each other. 'I luv u' shows awareness ofsituation and a word play that is ingenius. The album is entertaining,thoughtful and his style and he will be huge in the US because they arecrying out for a change, whereas here we are always changing and dizzee isthe forerunner. What do you call it? I call it Dizzee.
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