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"Bounty" Trilogy: Mutiny on the "Bounty", Men Against the Sea and Pitcairn's Island Paperback – 13 Apr 1989


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Product details

  • Paperback: 692 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown; New edition edition (13 April 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316611662
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316611664
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.5 x 23.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 583,457 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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THE British are frequently criticized by other nations for thier dislike of change, and indeed we love England for those aspects of nature and life which change the least. Read the first page
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A. J. Dean on 8 Dec 2000
Format: Paperback
I first read this trilogy in 1984 and the three part tale has stayed with me ever since. The personality clash between Christian and Bligh culminating in the mutiny. Bligh's incredible achievement in sailing a 23 foot open boat some 3,600 miles to safety with 19 loyal seamen. The tragic story of the party of mutineers and Tahitian men and women lead by Christain to their doom on Pitcairn, the world's loneliest island. The fate of those mutineers who stayed on Tahiti rather than sail with Christian only to be captured and returned to England for court-martial. I heartily recommend this volume to all as a study in human loyalty, betrayal, greed and murder.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 May 2004
Format: Paperback
Men Against the Sea is the second book in the Bounty Trilogy. Mutiny on the Bounty recounts the tale of the voyage of the H.M.S. Bounty from England to Tahiti and a little way back, the mutiny, and the subsequent events that affect those of the Bounty's crew who remain on Tahiti. When last seen in that book, Captain William Bligh is cast adrift far from land in a small vessel overladen with 18 other loyal men and about 7 to 8 inches of freeboard above a flat sea. Practically speaking, their chances are slim.
Men Against the Sea begins with the mutiny and describes what happens to Captain Bligh and those he commands as they make their way eventually to the Dutch East Indies. Along the way, Captain Bligh and his men traverse around 3,600 miles in their fragile vessel while suffering many horrors including attacks from the native people, lack of sleep, storms, bailing for their lives, cold, thirst, too much sun, and hunger. The authors make a good decision in choosing to have the ship's surgeon serve as the narrator of this saga. This perspective made it possible for the book to include his physical descriptions of the deprivations of the Bounty's abandoned crew to help make the story more compelling. In the true spirit of a story about English tars, there is a considerable discussion of how the starvation the men experienced affected their intestinal tracts.
Captain Bligh comes across very poorly in Mutiny on the Bounty. The opposite occurs in Men Against the Sea. His leadership is one of the great accomplishments of seamanship of all time.
But the men are only human after all. Someone steals two pounds of pork. Another shipmate sent to capture birds is overcome by the need to eat them, and spoils the hunting for everyone.
Read more ›
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By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 10 April 2004
Format: Paperback
Men Against the Sea is the second book in the Bounty Trilogy. Mutiny on the Bounty (see my review of that book under that title) recounts the tale of the voyage of the H.M.S. Bounty from England to Tahiti and a little way back, the mutiny, and the subsequent events that affect those of the Bounty's crew who remain on Tahiti. When last seen in that book, Captain William Bligh is cast adrift far from land in a small vessel overladen with 18 other loyal men and about 7 to 8 inches of freeboard above a flat sea.
Men Against the Sea describes what happens to Captain Bligh and those he commands as they make their way eventually to the Dutch East Indies. Along the way, Captain Bligh and his men traverse around 3,600 miles in their fragile vessel while suffering many horrors including attacks from the native people, lack of sleep, storms, bailing for their lives, cold, thirst, too much sun, and hunger. The authors make a good decision in choosing to have the ship's surgeon serve as the narrator of this saga. This perspective made it possible for the book to include his physical descriptions of the deprivations of the Bounty's abandoned crew to help make the story more compelling. In the true spirit of a story about English tars, there is a considerable discussion of how the starvation the men experienced affected their intestinal tracts.
Captain Bligh comes across very poorly in Mutiny on the Bounty. The opposite occurs in Men Against the Sea. His leadership is one of the great accomplishments of seamanship of all time.
But the men are only human after all. Someone steals two pounds of pork. Another shipmate sent to capture birds is overcome by the need to eat them, and spoils the hunting for everyone. In their weakened state, they miss many wonderful chances for food.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 15 Sep 2001
Format: Paperback
Men Against the Sea is the second book in the Bounty Trilogy. Mutiny on the Bounty... recounts the tale of the voyage of the H.M.S. Bounty from England to Tahiti and a little way back, the mutiny, and the subsequent events that affect those of the Bounty's crew who remain on Tahiti. When last seen in that book, Captain William Bligh is cast adrift far from land in a small vessel overladen with 18 other loyal men and about 7 to 8 inches of freeboard above a flat sea.
Men Against the Sea describes what happens to Captain Bligh and those he commands as they make their way eventually to the Dutch East Indies. Along the way, Captain Bligh and his men traverse around 3,600 miles in their fragile vessel while suffering many horrors including attacks from the native people, lack of sleep, storms, bailing for their lives, cold, thirst, too much sun, and hunger. The authors make a good decision in choosing to have the ship's surgeon serve as the narrator of this saga. This perspective made it possible for the book to include his physical descriptions of the deprivations of the Bounty's abandoned crew to help make the story more compelling. In the true spirit of a story about English tars, there is a considerable discussion of how the starvation the men experienced affected their intestinal tracts.
Captain Bligh comes across very poorly in Mutiny on the Bounty. The opposite occurs in Men Against the Sea. His leadership is one of the great accomplishments of seamanship of all time.
But the men are only human after all. Someone steals two pounds of pork. Another shipmate sent to capture birds is overcome by the need to eat them, and spoils the hunting for everyone. In their weakened state, they miss many wonderful chances for food.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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