Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen with Prime Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars63
4.8 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 6 March 2006
You really must read the first 3 books before reading this final one. So many stories and plots and sub-plots were revealed over this whole series. With the seeds of each character's destiny put forward and then resolved with perfect clarity in this final volume.
It is an amazing finale. Yes, the written history of Boudica's demise is fairly well known, but as always it's the way Manda Scott has interpreted history and woven the threads together that makes this book have such tension ans suspense. Knowing that Boudica dies in the end, doesn't stop this book from pulling the reader in and letting them almost see and feel the events that happen.
The battle scenes from the various points of view of different characters are wonderful, and set a real ambience in the reader's mind. And as always the ideas on the "dreaming" culture and how that is portrayed is superlative and fascinating.
The character development has also been brilliant, and you can really feel the changes and growth in such characters like Cunomar and Valerius and Graine. There is a surprising storyline with Valerius and Cygfa towards the end, and the the heartbreaking choices and feelings of Valerius and Corvus, knowing they'll face each other in battle is fantastic writing.
When the end comes, both of the book and of Boudica herself it's hard not to shed a tear or two. It is beautifully written, with characters you can really love(or hate) and it's hard not to feel you have been on a journey with them all, with nearly all the loose ends clearly resolved and still with plenty of room for personal thoughts and theories. Stunning book!! Thank you Manda Scott!!
0Comment|30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
This is the fourth book of what was to have been a trilogy, the author obviously had second thoughts and thank goodness she did. I believe that this one is the best of the lot, or maybe it is because it is still the freshest in my mind, no matter, they are all a triumph of historical fiction.

I do not think there is a boring page, never mind a boring chapter in any of them.

Most people who have any interest in history will have some knowledge of the Queen of the Iceni, what befell her and her daughters and the pain and suffering she rained down on the Roman invader in retribution.. . .

The Warrior Queen has burned Colchester to the ground and the Roman's are leaving London. Rome's forces are stretched to the limit and their chain of command is broken. Never in the history of the legions have the Roman forces been in such disarray.

Can Boudica sustain her advance against the might of Rome. Will she ever she her daughter Graine again. The young girl has taken refuge on the island of Mona will her mother succeed where others have failed. Can she unite the land of Britain against its invaders, or will the might of Rome finally impose its iron will on the tribes of Britain.
0Comment|15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
This is the fourth book of what was to have been a trilogy, the author obviously had second thoughts and thank goodness she did. I believe that this one is the best of the lot, or maybe it is because it is still the freshest in my mind, no matter, they are all a triumph of historical fiction.

I do not think there is a boring page, never mind a boring chapter in any of them.

Most people who have any interest in history will have some knowledge of the Queen of the Iceni, what befell her and her daughters and the pain and suffering she rained down on the Roman invader in retribution.. . .

The Warrior Queen has burned Colchester to the ground and the Roman's are leaving London. Rome's forces are stretched to the limit and their chain of command is broken. Never in the history of the legions have the Roman forces been in such disarray.

Can Boudica sustain her advance against the might of Rome. Will she ever she her daughter Graine again. The young girl has taken refuge on the island of Mona will her mother succeed where others have failed. Can she unite the land of Britain against its invaders, or will the might of Rome finally impose its iron will on the tribes of Britain.
0Comment|11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 June 2007
I have been unable to put this series down from the start but the fourth book, Dreaming the Serpent Spear makes you feel proud to be British but deeply saddened of the way we now are.

This book over and above the other four thrusts you into a space where you can hear the dreaming, see the dreaming and smell, hear and taste the blood and love. This is a book written in such a way that makes you want to stand up and fight for what is right, fight for the peace and tranquility that is snatched away from us all too often.

You can read this book without the other three but I recommend you don't. I strongly recommend that you read them all back to back and in as short a time as possible. Manda explains at the back of the book the Historical basis for the story and for me it screams a writing skill that few can match. I have always loved the image of Boucidea, Boudica and the tribe of the Eceni but these four books and this one in particular is spellbinding in such a way that you will read it agian and again. I will of that I am sure if not for the honour and the hope of something after death then simply for the superb, sheer brilliance of the book(s).
11 comment|27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 February 2006
After waiting for a year with baited breath for the concluding book of Manda Scott's 'Boudica' series, I found the story being taken to new levels, after experiencing the detail of the tribal rites, and the mind-blowing scene of the final battle... The constant love shown between Valerius and Corvus, despite being on opposing sides, is heart-breaking - especially in the concluding chapters. An appropriate finish to an immensely realistic series. For anyone interested in fictional works (largely refenced on fact) about Boudica, 'Dreaming the Serpent Spear', and it precending counter-parts are must-reads.
0Comment|14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 September 2008
Many writers can make you visualise the scene they are writing about, but Manda Scott has the skills to actually take you there, to make you believe you are there with her characters in person, witnessing the events in all four of her books. I found it un-put-downable from the first chapter of the first book, to the final words of this the fourth.
I recommend anyone to read them all, in order. Follow the Boudica through her life with the warriors, singers and dreamers of the ancient Britons, through the Roman invasion, to her truimph in her uprising, and her brother in his abduction into slavery and long, cruel journey through the Roman Legions, to leadership as a Decurion and eventual return to his kinsmen to fight against the very men he had once fought with, alongside his sister. A compelling and utterly believable story, and remarkably well written.
0Comment|9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 July 2010
So, we have arrived at the final climatic novel of Scott's series. Having started with a touch too much fantasy in the opener the previous two efforts have been high quality and gripping. The pace, characterisation and emotive response doesn't let up in this final novel as we follow Breaca to her inexorable destiny at the hands of the Augusta II.
The novel opens rapidly where the third left off. Cygfa and Graine are coming to terms with their brutal mistreatment at the hands of a cohort of Roman legionaries. Breaca herself is painfully learning to wield a sword again whilst Valerius seeks to prove himself to the Iceni host whilst the simmering anger of Cunomar lingers painfully at his side, the younger man desperate to prove himself his mother's heir should she fall in battle. from this point we follow Scott's retelling of what little history we know as Valerius destroys the IX legion in a manner emulating the infamous Varian defeat in A.D. 9. Cunomar develops his own band of elite troops, the Bears, blooding them in fierce combat. All the while Breaca is struggling to heal, both physically and mentally, reaching her fateful decision during the final sack of the Claudian Temple in Camulodunum whilst her son and brother debate who must lead the war host.
After injecting a cameo from Graine as she defeats the Corvus-led invasion of Mona using the power of the Dreamers and the subsequent self-sacrifice by Dubornos after the rites in the lands of the Coritani, we find Hawk appointed the true bearer of Breaca's father's sword and the swelling host of the British warriors sacking London before the final fateful battle.
When readers of Scott's magnificent series find themselves reluctant to read this final novel they will realise that the character empathy engendered by this sterling author has given us an emotional link to Breaca and the Iceni. We know with terrible finality that Breaca will die because history commands it but we do not wish it to happen. As the pages march inexorably on the heart grows heavier knowing the Dreamers and the Iceni are doomed to failure and the Boudicca cannot lead her people to victory. Still, Scott delivers it in a manner that is both exhilarating in Breaca's courageous fight at the climatic battle and her subsequent benediction on the surviving Valerius, Cygfa and Graine who take the power of the Dreamers into a hidden world to rest and nurture before being reborn once the Roman Empire falls.
My review of the opening novel in this quartet found it lacking and fantastical. That view remains. However, from the second novel through to the end Scott delivers a series that packs an massive emotional punch, crisp subplots, vibrant language and a colourful sense of humanity that ensures the pages keep turning faster and faster. It will appeal to readers wanting to gain a sense of the violence and raw battles that define the period, it will appeal to readers trying to gain a sense of the celtic druids and the otherworlds they trod in. But above all, it will appeal to the reader who wants to pick up a series and wish it never stopped.
A masterpiece.
22 comments|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 14 December 2007
This is the fourth book of what was to have been a trilogy, the author obviously had second thoughts and thank goodness she did. I believe that this one is the best of the lot, or maybe it is because it is still the freshest in my mind, no matter, they are all a triumph of historical fiction.

I do not think there is a boring page, never mind a boring chapter in any of them.

Most people who have any interest in history will have some knowledge of the Queen of the Iceni, what befell her and her daughters and the pain and suffering she rained down on the Roman invader in retribution.. . .

The Warrior Queen has burned Colchester to the ground and the Roman's are leaving London. Rome's forces are stretched to the limit and their chain of command is broken. Never in the history of the legions have the Roman forces been in such disarray.

Can Boudica sustain her advance against the might of Rome. Will she ever she her daughter Graine again. The young girl has taken refuge on the island of Mona will her mother succeed where others have failed. Can she unite the land of Britain against its invaders, or will the might of Rome finally impose its iron will on the tribes of Britain.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 March 2006
This is the fourth book in what was originally conceived as a triology the most well known part of the Boudica's story but still as captivating and imaginative as the other three in the series. The story interweaves historicle fact with the fictional world of the dreamers so much so that you almost wish that the ending could be different. Although the boudica did not win her final battle i certainly hope that this isn't the last vist to to these times and can only hope that at some point Graine's story will need to told
0Comment|11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 June 2011
I thoroughly enjoyed all four novels from the Boudica series. It drew me in and captured me like no other. Manda's attention to detail throughout all of the books allowed me to completely immerse myself in the story, as though I was there. It gave me an insight to the lives of those at the time that I had never appreciated before. I felt like I could smell the smoke on the Great Round House, feel the texture of plants, feel the yearning for the characters' lovers or their exhaustion from battle. Most importantly for me, it allowed me to develop an overwhelming bond with the characters, a real sense if intense familiarity as if they were my family and friends... As though I was Breaca.

Manda's style of writing allows the reader to develop a real understanding of the characters' personalities and invites you to join them on their journey to discover themselves. You learn some things about yourself too. I found myself emotionally drawn into their lives, shedding more than a few tears along the way, as I journeyed on their roller coaster of emotions - guilt, remorse, regret, jealousy, love, etc.

The strength of the dreaming was incredible and refreshing to be open to the powers of their gods that were connected to the Earth, rather than the writings in a book.

Reading the Boudica's story was a great experience, I don't think I have felt so involved in a book since a child. It was great to find new heroes in my life and to gain a small insight into this time in Britain's history. The storyline was cleverly interwoven into the facts available, bringing the artefacts to life in a colourful way - so you could both learn and romanticise.

It was a sad moment when I finished the last page of the fourth book, not only because it was the end of the series, but because it was time to say goodbye to the characters. It was like saying goodbye to friends you have known all your life.

So a very large thanks to Manda, who should be truly commended for her outstanding writing. Simply superb.
Sarah
0Comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.