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Books of Magic Deluxe Edition HC Hardcover – 5 Feb 2013


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; Deluxe ed edition (5 Feb 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401237819
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401237813
  • Product Dimensions: 18.6 x 1.5 x 28.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 137,526 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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About the Author

Neil Gaiman is the NEW YORK TIMES bestselling author of AMERICAN GODS and CORALINE (illustrated by Dave McKean). His other novels include NEVERWHERE, STARDUST (winner of the American Library Association's Alex Award as one of 2000's top ten adult novels for young adults), the short fiction collection SMOKE AND MIRRORS and the critically acclaimed comic book series THE SANDMAN. He is the author of the children's book THE WOLVES IN THE WALLS (illustrated by Dave McKean). Among his many awards are the Hugo, the Nebula, the World Fantasy Award and the Bram Stoker Award.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on 2 May 2004
Format: Paperback
A 12-year old kid with glasses, with the potential to be a great magician but doesn't realise it yet, who acquires a magic owl? This may sound like Harry Potter, but Timothy Hunter, the hero of 'The Books of Magic', first appeared in comic book form in 1990 - and he definitely isn't public school material.
Timothy is just skateboarding around the estate when he is accosted by four sinister trenchcoated characters and taken on a journey from the beginning to the end of time, with detours through occult corners of America and the hidden land of Faerie. Along the way he meets pretty much every occult-related character who has ever appeared in the 'DC universe'.
This is an unusually deep and rich graphic novel. Roger Zelazny's introduction points out its structural adherence to the "hero's journey" model which Joseph Campbell identified as the heart of all myths. It's funny, charming, and chilling by turns.
As an accessible introduction to "magick" this book rivals Alan Moore's "Promethea" series. Along the way you'll learn with Timothy why you should never give your real name, why it's inadvisable to step off the path once on it, and why you should never accept gifts from the Fair Folk.
The books of magic became a series. This is the only one written by Gaiman, though he acted as a consultant to the later ones. Despite some good ideas, the later books fizzle out rather, partly due to being set in London but written by Americans - British readers will not be surprised that, as usual, they can't do convincing English dialogue and convey little sense of place. But the original is unfaultable, with a last page that makes me catch my breath every time. Just do yourself a favour and buy it!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. R. Cox on 24 April 2011
Format: Paperback
Of the 4 books of magic in this compendium 2 are actually stories with character, plot and action while the other 2 are meditations - 1 about the past, 1 about the future. Neither meditate very deeply and anyone who's read more than a handful of fantasy novels or comics will be able to predict the topics and observations made.

Fortunately the 2 books with stories are both are superb.

One is enlivened by the character of John Constantine, who Gaiman can write at least as well as Moore. Snide jokes, billowing trench coat, sarf landan slang and attempted murder every 10 pages. What's not to like?

The other is kind of a dry run for the "Midsummer Night's Dream" tale from "The Sandman". Faeries. Also known as vicious lying psychopaths. You just can't trust 'em...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 May 2011
Format: Paperback
Long before J.K. Rowling ever wrote about Harry Potter, there was another owl-toting, bespectacled young wizard with a destiny.

And somehow it doesn't surprise me that Neil Gaiman was responsible for that wizard's creation in "The Books of Magic." This brilliant four-part graphic novel is full of shadowy art, strange happenings and wild magic -- and while it was intended to be a story highlighting the more magical DC characters, it ended up taking a life of its own.

Timothy Hunter is playing alone in the street when he's approached by four men who ask him a simple question: "Do you believe in magic?" Obviously he says no, but after a brief demonstration of it, he reluctantly agrees to be taught in the ways of magic.

First, the Phantom Stranger takes him back on a first-class history tour -- the birth of the universe, the fall of Atlantis, the teenage life of the great wizard Merlin, the rise of magic in many different lands and its eventual wane. Then Tim takes a trip to to America with John Constantine to get acquainted with some of the more mystical creatures there... and ends up up to his neck in trouble

After that, Dr. Occult takes Tim into the world of Faerie, where he comes across a great sleeping king, gets caught by Baba Yaga, and shown Gemworld, Skartaris, Pytharia, a tiny glimpse of Hell, and a brief trip into the Dreamworld. He also counters Queen Titania, who seems to have a connection to him. And finally, Mr. E takes Tim into the future and shows him great wars, the return of magic, and the possible death of the world -- as well as his own future fate...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 27 Aug 2010
Format: Paperback
There may be some similarities between Tim Hunter and Harry Potter, but they are few, and even Neil Gaiman has the good grace to acknowledge that no work of fiction is created in a vacuum and that he and J K Rowling were both drawinfg inspiration form similar sources. Both characters are potentialy powerful magic users with glasses and a pet Owl but that is were the similarities end.

This book is less of a story than it is a journey through magic in the DC Universe. Tim is introduced to three eras of magic and the Faerie kingdoms by four well known magical practitioners of magic from the DC Comics pantheon in order to help him decide whether he wants to commit to a life as a wizard or just lead a mundane life. We are introduced to a series of fantastic and imaginative concepts as to how magic works in the DC universe and to various characters such as Baron Blood and Zattana. This book for me was more about ideas than a rivetting plot and I found myself pausing everyso often to just go over the concepts that were introduced in my head. The artwork is also a reason to pick up this volume as it contains the work of John Bolton, Scott Hampton and Charles Vess, who was wisely chosen to illustate the chapter set in the lands of Faerie.

I heartily recommend this book to anyone with an interest in fantasy, its not just for comic fans either as you dont need to know anything about the DD Universe to enjoy this read.
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