Bon Appetit! and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Bon Appetit!: Travels wit... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Over 2 million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Bon Appetit!: Travels with knife,fork & corkscrew through France: Travels Through France with Knife, Fork and Corkscrew Paperback – 6 Jun 2002


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£10.99
£4.00 £0.01
£10.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Bon Appetit!: Travels with knife,fork & corkscrew through France: Travels Through France with Knife, Fork and Corkscrew + Encore Provence + Toujours Provence
Price For All Three: £30.96

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Sphere; New Ed edition (6 Jun. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 075153269X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0751532692
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 292,515 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Amazon Review

Peter Mayle, author of the bestselling A Year in Provence has done it again--but differently. Travelling this time beyond his adopted Provence throughout France, the food and travel writer has produced Bon Appetit!, a celebration of many of the country's gastronomic joys. Whether pursuing La Foire de Fromages, the annual cheese fair at Livarot; a Burgundian marathon offering runners Médoc refreshment; or a village truffle mass that concludes with a heady dégustation of the newly blessed tuber, Mayle takes his readers in hand and shows all. Wide-eyed yet knowing, ever affable but with a touch of mischief, he's an ideal companion, the best possible narrator of his lively food adventures.

Mayle's gastronomic baptism occurs when, as a 19-year-old, he dines for the first time in France. "At the first mouthful of French bread and French butter," he writes, "my taste buds, dormant until then, went into spasm." The paroxysm leads to serious food-and-wine perambulations--and, finally, to chapters including "The Thigh-Taster of Vitel" (a frog-eating fete), "Slow Food" (snail love in Martigny les Bains) and "The Guided Stomach" (an investigation of the Michelin Guide restaurant inspection) among others. Readers are also present for a debate on the secret of the perfect omelette, a search for the best possible chicken in Bourg-en-Bresse and a visit to a St Tropez restaurant notable for its scantily clad habitués. Those familiar with Mayle's work, and those yet to discover it, are in for a treat. --Arthur Boehm --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Peter Mayle's idyllic portrait makes you almost taste the wonderful food and wine, feel the sun and balmy breezes (SUNDAY EXPRESS)

Delightfully readable. The style is high comedy and Mayle is bitingly funny about local rural mores. But the jokeyness only partly obscures Mayle's warm enthusiasm for local life and landscape. (SUNDAY TIMES)

A gastronomic delight. (SUNDAY TRIBUNE)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By "graemewright4" on 27 Jun. 2002
Format: Paperback
After a brief detour into the realm of fiction Peter Mayle here returns to what he does best: selling the French and their many humorous mannerisms to us Francophobic Brits! Bon Appetit acts as a tour guide to the regional culinary peculiarities that is France; from the annual truffle Mass at Richerenches near Orange to the ultimate in detoxes at Michel Guerard's spa at Eugenie-les-Bains this is a book which should not be read with an empty stomach. Mayle's histrionic prose is liberally seasoned with descriptions of frog's leg and Bresse chicken, truffle omelette and Burgundian bender - this being a festival known as "les Trois Glorieuses" and a cutely French excuse for grown men to dress up in robes and hats and drink copiously for three days. In England we would call it a lads' weekend in Blackpool!
Bon Appetit does not pretend to be an exhaustive guide to all things French and food-oriented but it does present us with a candid snapshot of a nation enjoying its culinary riches; in every chapter there seem to be colourful locals who are prepared to humour this naive Englishman and explain in painstaking detail why it is not recommended to eat wild snails or how to be a champion cheese eater. Mayle, like Paul Theroux, seems to attach himself magnetically to these characters and, at times, it becomes a little tiresome, cliched almost when another friendly local clears his throat in an attempt to educate our author. That said, Bon Appetit is a slickly written and informative introduction to the pros and cons of French cuisine. It will make you laugh, it will make you salivate and it will make you look twice at those little shelled molluscs that seem intent on devouring your entire garden every night. Good eating!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 Mar. 2002
Format: Hardcover
Taking a break from Provence Peter Mayle takes us on a gastronomic tour of France and visits places that celebrate such items as frogs legs, snails, cheese and of course, wine. Although I was a bit apprehensive about buying this book as it seemed to be a change of direction for Peter, and I really loved his books on Provence, I can say that it is very entertaining as well as educational. If you are looking for a light read and still need that bit of escapism then this book is recommended. Its a fun read eventhough the particular culinary delights of various towns may not be to everyones taste!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By agamemnon on 27 Jan. 2004
Format: Paperback
This is the book to read if you want to know about, or perhaps visit, all those food fairs and festivals celebrated by our French neighbours across the Channel. They have whole weekends devoted to the truffle, the humble snail, a special cheese... And as ever with Peter Mayle, the French participants are full of Gallic charm and unconsciously entertaining to us over here. Peter tours around the country visiting many towns and villages, and gives a helpful resume of festivals at the end for anyone keen to retrace his steps. Great fun!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua VINE VOICE on 23 July 2008
Format: Paperback
Peter Mayle is probably best known for his two travelogues set in Provence - "A Year in Provence" and "Toujours Provence". While "Bon Appétit" is also set in France, it isn't restricted to Provence - it follows Peter's (fairly random) travels throughout the country - basically going wherever his belly leads him.

While British chefs are probably known better for the swearing than their food, their French counterparts are widely viewed as artists. Having spent his early years in post-war England, Peter had come to view food solely as fuel - and certainly not as something you could seriously enjoy. It was a business trip to France, guarding the managerial briefcase, that opened his eyes - a trip that is recalled in the book's opening chapter. His boss, Mr Jenkins, proves to be the stereotypical Englishman - he doesn't have a good word to say about the French, makes no attempt to speak "their lingo" and advises young Peter that, should any further explanations be required, shouting is the best course of action. While there are some who relate very well to Mr Jenkins, Peter isn't one of them : he credits that trip with the loss of his gastronomic virginity, and - if this book in anything to go by - it became the launchpad to a love affair with French cooking.

Peter travels the length and breadth of the country, but doesn't restrict himself to the cafes and restaurants. By the looks of it, there must be any number of food-related festivals. There's a trip to Richerenches for the `Messe des Truffes' - which goes to show you, I guess, just how religious some people are about what they eat. Interestingly, Richerenches started life as a fort built by the Knights Templar.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nicola F (Nic) TOP 500 REVIEWER on 16 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback
If you like your foodie anecdotes to be both informative yet quirky, then this is most certainly the book for you. Peter Mayle takes us on a tour through France's numerous culinary festivals celebrating the countries great eats- from frogs, to snails to Burgundy wine marathons; and yes, be prepared to have your taste buds tantalised! The writing style is witty but never patronising or know it all- and whilst being entertained as a reader you also genuinely learn some useful little facts, though inevitably some chapters are more amusing than others. Mayle's love for France his adopted home, shines through every chapter and his admiration for the countrymen is embelished in his detailed descriptions of their mannerisms and coloquialisms, which really adds to the theme of the book. After a while the settings become so vivid you feel like you yourself have been there, taking part in the abundant gastronomic delights.

I enjoyed this book a lot- I've never read any of Mayle's before and picked this up on a whim in a charity shop, seduced by the cover. It speaks volumes of the excellent descriptions of the food and drink throughout that it really made me want to zip straight across the channel and indulge in some stinky cheeses and rich calvados! I'll certainly be reading more novels by him in the future.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback