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Bomb Girls - Britain's Secret Army: The Munitions Women of World War II Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews

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Length: 249 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Product Description

About the Author

Jacky Hyams is a freelance journalist, editor, columnist, and author. She spent several years as a women's magazine editor on "Bella Magazine," followed by six years as a weekly columnist for the "London Evening Standard." She is the author of "Bombsites and Lollipops," "The Female Few," ""and "The Real Life of Downton Abbey."

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2327 KB
  • Print Length: 249 pages
  • Publisher: John Blake; Reprint edition (5 Aug. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00EBO1Z4G
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #52,483 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Jacky Hyams is a Brighton based journalist and best selling non fiction author. She has been writing for a wide range of mass market newspapers and magazines in the UK and Australia for several years.

Jacky's passion for 20th Century history led to the publication of her best selling personal memoir about post WW2 London: Bombsites and Lollipops, published by John Blake Publishing in 2011. The memoir has sold over 60,000 copies.

The followup, White Boots & Mini Skirts: A True Story of Life in the Swinging Sixties, was published by Blake in February 2013, also to considerable acclaim.

Jacky's third historically related title, The Female Few: Spitfire Pilots of the ATA, was published by The History Press in 2012. The book has now been optioned by a leading Hollywood producer.

This was followed by her unique history of Britain's WW2 female munitions workers, Bomb Girls: Britain's Secret Army, published by John Blake Publishing.

Jacky's recent book, Frances Kray: The Tragic Bride, tells the unold true story of the life of Reggie Kray's first wife, Frances Shea, first published by John Blake Publishing in September 2014. In the updated paperback version, published in September 2015, Jacky reveals, through new interviews and documents that have never been made public before, even more insights into Frances' story, revealing a wholly original and fresh perspective on life in the Kray Twins' inner circle -- and the troubled life of the innocent young woman at its centre.

Jacky is also the co-author of a second book about the Kray Twins, One of The Family: 40 years with the Krays, published by Century in July 2015 and a Sunday Times Top Ten bestseller. Written in collaboration with hairdresser and Page 3 girl Maureen Flanagan, the book tells the story of Maureen's unique relationship with the Kray family over the years.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Bomb Girls records the stories of nine women who, as young girls, worked in the dispersed Royal Ordnance Factories during the Second World War. Their job was to make the bombs, bullets and other lethal weapons to defeat the Germans, Italians and Japanese in the Second World War. It was an extraordinarily dangerous occupation. The chemicals and explosives were injurious to health and explosively lethal if mishandled. The factories were dispersed around the country to reduce the risk of being bombed, and nearly all the workforce was comprised of young women, some being as young as seventeen. Many left home to do the job, often resulting in serious homesickness, but many also made lifelong friendships, and look back with pride on those years of when they made a substantial contribution to helping Britain win the war. The book contains recent interviews with nine women who are now in their late eighties and early nineties. They were definitely made of the right stuff. It is a pleasure and a privilege to read their histories, most of them having come from very simple backgrounds. It is a deep pity that their contribution to the defeat of the Axis Powers has never received official recognition, so this book will, perhaps, persuade Whitehall and the Government to honour the women whilst we still have time.
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Format: Kindle Edition
My Mum was so pleased to get a copy of this book especially as she is mentioned in it in Laura's story.
Gave me an insight into what the girls working in munitions went through and nice it was in their own words.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book tells The stories of some of the thousands for women who worked in munitions factories in the Second World War. It starts with a few chapters giving an introduction to munitions factories, and how and where they operated, and then tells individual stories of some of the women who worked in them - the vast majority of the workers were women.
The book is very good as far as it goes. Unfortunately, for me it has two major downsides. Firstly, it is written by someone who is campaigning for recognition for the people who worked in the factories. Now I have no problem with that campaign; their contribution was not, and even now has not been, fully recognised. However, it does get a bit tiring when the campaign is mentioned for the umpteenth time.
Secondly, the individual stories become a little bit repetitive. I realise that the number of women involved who were still alive when the book was written was dwindling all the time, but they all seem to come from the same background, and their stories are all very similar. You can almost predict what is going to be said.
Having said all that, this is an important book, because it does give a voice to these women, and puts on record what they did and what they achieved.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was absolutely outstanding, and the women who sacrificed so much during the wars should be applauded. It was a fantastic insight into British history. It was harrowing in that if you were a 20/21 year old single female, you would more than likely be sent to work in the bomb factories, and the danger of the factories was well known. It is a truly inspiring read and I would recommend it to anyone because these women should be remembered just as much as the fallen soldiers. Complete and utter heroes.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is great.
I found it particulary interesting because my mother was in the orderance factory during the war.
It gives you an insight of what they put up with to enable this country to win the war.
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Enjoyed the book but what about the girls in the munitions factories in WW1? They didn't get thanked either. They earnt good money for the time, better than people in other jobs, so were far better off.
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My mother was a Bomb Girl. This book confirms everything she told me, including her feelings of being forgotten by the Nation.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This very interesting book is a collection of reminiscences from munitions workers during WW11. They really are unsung heroes, their work was highly dangerous and hazardous to their health. The overriding aim was to produce a variety of shells, bullets and bombs for the Forces - at any cost, wether it be lives or personal happiness. Naively, I had no idea so many women were conscripted into this industry and I'm sure there were a lot more accidents than were officially recorded. These women certainly deserve official recognition of their contribution to the War Effort, they were in as much danger as any soldier.
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