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Blues From Laurel Canyon
 
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Blues From Laurel Canyon

11 Oct 1989 | Format: MP3

£5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £6.16 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:47
30
2
2:53
30
3
4:29
30
4
3:51
30
5
3:34
30
6
2:45
30
7
3:19
30
8
4:40
30
9
2:24
30
10
5:10
30
11
3:29
30
12
9:04


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 11 Oct 1989
  • Release Date: 11 Oct 1989
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: (C) 1989 Decca Music Group Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:25
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003RXBIVW
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 106,942 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. W. Elliott on 22 Sep 2003
Format: Audio CD
Who would believe that this album is 35 years old!!!! Any afficionado of the British Blues Boom should ensure this is in their collection. Featuring a young Mick Taylor, who still plays pretty mean guitar on his own and Carla Olsen's albums, the boss of British Blues (now about 70 years of age) provides a mixture of subtle sophisticated jazz-blues (Miss James, First Time Alone) and hard hitting in-your-face numbers such as 2401, the Bear and Walking on Sunset). But what marks this album out is the pure sophisticated skill of Mick Taylor (still a teenager at that time, if I'm not mistaken) which culminates in a highly developed solo in Fly Tomorrow. This is the same Mick Taylor who later joined and left the Rolling Stones, presumably because his talents were undervalued by his having to play second fiddle (sic) to Keith Richards. Following in the footsteps of the now legendary Eric Clapton (yes even he could play real mean blues in those days)and the undoubted genius of Peter Green, Mayall had unearthed yet another master of the six-string. This album marks the zenith of a set of 5 Decca releases featuring Taylor - the memorable Crusade, much in the style of Bluesbreakers and Hard Road, Bare Wires (Mayall's first foray into Jazz-Blues fusion and Diary of a Band Vols 1 & 2 - a pair of live albums eminently missable because of the poor mixing from an eight-track tape deck.
But enough of my prattling, if you're new to the 60's/70's Blues Boom, take my word as someone who has followed it from the beginnings, you should get your hand on this, even if you find Mayall's somewhat strangulated vocal tones a bit much at times. It marks the end of an era and not until the Blues Reunion of 82 and the Bluesbreakers featuring Walter Trout and Coco Montoya, did the "man" return to his natural calling.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mr. David W. Lang on 17 July 2004
Format: Audio CD
Oh yes! This really hits the spot! Laurel Canyon was the culmination of several years riding the hard road of English blues, and this stripped-down lineup was the tightest and most consistent outfit Mayall had until years later. Having seen all the Mayall bands live since Clapton's legendary era, I saw this particular lineup on several occasions and on a good night there was no-one to beat them.
In many respects Laurel Canyon is a return to the roots of the Clapton and early Green days, i.e. less jazzy. And it features Mick Taylor, of course - an astonishingly fine guitarist, and the longest-serving axeman up to that point. Not only a lyrical and fluent lead guitarist, Mick also plays very fine slide, which is given ample exposure here. Peter Green's guest appearance on the very atmospheric First Time Alone is one of the high points, and it was great to see him back with his old boss. (At the time Laurel Canyon was released, Fleetwood Mac had begun to enjoy phenomenal success, and of course without Mayall it's arguable that FM may not have existed - Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood having played together in one of Mayall's lineups.)
Not to be missed by anyone with the slightest interest in British Blues in general and Mayall's extraordinary legacy in particular. Now all we need is a re-release of the Diary of a Band albums - dire sound quality, but some electric performances by the last of Mayall's 'big bands', especially showcasing Mick Taylor's guitar work, recorded a few months before the Laurel Canyon lineup. Please?
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Nick Cassidy on 3 May 2003
Format: Audio CD
I bought this album when it was released in the 60's and it has remained an all-time favourite. It was John's first release with a stripped down band since disbanding the Bluesbreakers. The songs are great and the playing is awesome. Mick Taylor went on to the Stones and the other two joined Stone the Crows. It was a very long time before another Mayall album came anywhere close to this one. Buy it.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer VINE VOICE on 23 Jan 2002
Format: Audio CD
This is an excellent, straight forward album originally released in 1968. Despite the cover pics of Mayall pretending to be a backwoodsman communing with nature and some crass lyrics the music hits the spot most of the time. It features an exciting, young Mick Taylor on guitar before he replaced Brian Jones in the Rolling Stones. (Tired of the same old Jagger/Richards riffs he joined the more adventurous Jack Bruce Band a few years later. A fine musical decision, if not a financial one.) I digress...A fine album with a good flow throughout. A really tight band with Stephen Thomson on bass and Carl Allen on drums.
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