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Blues Breakers
 
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Blues Breakers

20 Feb 2014 | Format: MP3

4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 6.91 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
1
3:35
2
3:13
3
2:33
4
1:45
5
3:00
6
4:25
7
2:05
8
2:18
9
5:53
10
3:06
11
2:27
12
2:39
13
3:32
14
3:13
15
2:33
16
1:43
17
3:00
18
4:25
19
2:05
20
2:20
21
5:53
22
3:05
23
2:26
24
2:40


Product details

  • Label: Decca Music Group Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 1998 Decca Music Group Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:13:54
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001PKR65Q
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 13,461 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 56 people found the following review helpful By "nickpaulmichael" on 15 Feb 2006
Format: Audio CD
I first listened to this disc as a fifteen year-old and music was never the same thereafter. I started hunting straight away for the original US musicians who had inspired first Mayall and then the unbelievably young Clapton. And I'm still listening to the fruits of that search. Meantime it opened me up to the expanding British Blues scene and subsequently other new British genres, all the way from Fleetwood Mac and Chicken Shack, to The Groundhogs, Steeleye and Fairport. The music itself is quite simply inspired, mainly by the fusion of the very different talents of the individuals involved. I'm not sure that Mayall ever wrote, sang or played as well again 'though Clapton went on to far greater things. Just listen to Track 5, Double Crossin' Time, written by the both of them, which displays their different talents perfectly. This disc is one of those very rare seminal recordings which brings as much pleasure now as on the day it came off the presses.
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By thegdog on 8 Feb 2007
Format: Audio CD
The best guitar player of the time on top of his game. Classic tracks. The perfect combination of guitar and amp. Incredible solos... Listening to this album it is easy to see why rock took the directions it did. This is the blueprint for pretty much every rock/blues album that followed, and in my opinion the closest Clapton ever got to this ever again is on Layla... This is Essential.
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63 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Bob Heath on 13 Feb 2002
Format: Audio CD
Although John Mayall used a series of lead guitarists for his Bluesbreakers band in the 60s and 70s, including Peter Green and Mick Taylor, it was Clapton who really shone, as his guitar talent had already been formed with the Yardbirds. However, this is not an Eric Clapton album, as the main performer, and band leader, was Mayall himself who was an experienced and exciting blues player. Additionally, strong backing support was provided on bass guitar by John McVie (later Fleetwood Mac) and Hughie Flint on drums to what is going on out front. This one of the two best Mayall recordings, and Clapton features very strongly throughout. Indeed, his work here is probably stronger than the later Cream recordings. This is essential rhythm and blues from a period when good R & B bands were a dominant feature of the UK music scene (Rory Gallagher; Victor Brox: etc), and where Mayall represented the pinnacle. If you like blues and/or Clapton do not miss this one.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By S. Roberts on 7 July 2005
Format: Audio CD
This is the album that launched the Gibson Les Paul + Marshall amp combination that has defined the sound of rock for so long. It is worth buying for that alone. Absolute, pure, smooth but crunchy, toney goodness! Thankfully, the music is top notch, ranging from the energetic opener to the instrumental "Steppin Out", to the drum solo and tribute to the Beatles' "Day Tripper" on "What'd I Say?". Excellent stuff.
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65 of 70 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Aleshin on 15 Dec 2002
Format: Audio CD
Few albums have had greater impact than the landmark John Mayall With Eric Clapton "Blues Breakers." Released by the Decca label in Britain on 22 July 1966, literally days after Clapton quit the Bluesbreakers and just a week before Cream's debut, it went all the way to #6, a pretty mean feat since Mayall's band had never had a hit single. This may have been a first in Britain.
Of course, this is the album that set the blues and guitar worlds aflame and established Eric Clapton's name worldwide as the most passionate of musical interpreters. If you haven't yet heard "Beano" (as the album is affectionately known, because Clapton is pictured reading "The Beano" comic book on its cover), then you ain't heard nuthin' yet!
From the album's first notes, you realize that you're in guitar heaven, as "Slowhand" shows us the way electric guitar can and should be played. Clapton's virtuoso playing is white-hot throughout. Playing with maturity beyond his 21 years, the young Eric Clapton was so influential that Gibson eventually reissued the (out-of-production since 1960) Les Paul model guitar, which Clapton then played.
John Mayall's Bluesbreakers served--and still serves today--as a finishing school for great musicians and sidemen (Clapton, Peter Green, Mick Taylor, John McVie, Jack Bruce, Aynsley Dunbar, Mick Fleetwood, Coco Montoya and others). Mayall's proselytizing the blues (he's 69 years old!), his songwriting skills, and his other musical talents should not be ignored nor taken lightly.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Alan Burridge on 28 May 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
On a week's holiday with my parent's in Littlehampton in Sussex during the summer of '66, as ever, I found a record shop. Without much money as I was still at school, (just), I had the choice, in my mind anyway, between two albums; The Mother's Of Invention's 'Freakout,' and 'Bluesbreakers.' Maybe there had been a lot of publicity at the time about 'Freakout,' I can't remember, but for some reason I was torn between which one to buy. Probably the fact that I was a Yardbirds fan and had listened to 'Five Live' a great deal made up my mind, and I plumped for 'Bluesbreakers.' It was to be the wisest move and the best purchase I ever made. As a then, and still now, 'would-be' guitarist, this album, for its time in rock history, had everything you wanted and more, and has pretty much stayed that way over the ensuing years. To play with this degree of skill and feeling at Clapton's age of 21 at the time, was and is incredible. At 15, he was almost an old man to me being 6 years older, yet even so, the bluesmen I had heard were in their 30's and over, (really old men!), and even now this album begs the question "Why was Clapton so great at such a young age?" We will never know, and if put to the question, probably neither would he? It was just something he was drawn to and did, and has had the good fortune to do so for the rest of his life. If you're a guitarist, Clapton fan, blues enthusiast, whatever, and you don't own this album, simply buy it now - it will remain a classic for as long as planet Earth keeps turning.
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