Bluebeard and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£5.38
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by RecycLivre - uk
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Shipped from France.Your purchase supports literacy charities.
Trade in your item
Get a £2.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Bluebeard (Delta Fiction) Paperback – 1 Feb 1999


See all 28 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 1 Feb 1999
£5.38


Trade In this Item for up to £2.50
Trade in Bluebeard (Delta Fiction) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £2.50, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group (1 Feb. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 038533351X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385333511
  • Product Dimensions: 13.4 x 1.9 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 183,321 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Kurt Vonnegut was a writer, lecturer and painter. He was born in Indianapolis in 1922 and studied biochemistry at Cornell University. During WWII, as a prisoner of war in Germany, he witnessed the destruction of Dresden by Allied bombers, an experience which inspired Slaughterhouse Five. First published in 1950, he went on to write fourteen novels, four plays, and three short story collections, in addition to countless works of short fiction and nonfiction. He died in 2007.

Product Description

About the Author

Kurt Vonnegut has been described by Thomas M. Disch as 'an artist surely destined for canonisation,' in the Times Literary Supplement. His novels include: Galapagos, SlaughterHouse- Five, Breakfast of Champions, Jailbird and Deadeye Dick. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
HAVING WRITTEN "The End" to this story of my life, I find it prudent to scamper back here to before the beginning, to my front door, so to speak, and to make this apology to arriving gusts: "I promised you an autobiography, but something went wrong in the kitchen. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 11 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Rgs Draycott on 10 Feb. 2006
Format: Paperback
Vonnegut rounds up several familiar themes and character types for his 13th novel: genocide, the surreality of the modern world, fluid interplay of the past and present, and the less-than-heroic figure taking center stage to tell his story. Here he elevates to narrator a minor character from Breakfast of Champions , wounded World War II veteran and abstract painter Rabo Karabekian. At the urging of enchantress-as-bully Circe Berman, Karabekian writes his "hoax autobiography." Vonnegut uses the tale to satirize art movements and the art-as-investment mind-set and to explore the shifting shape of reality.
Vonnegut re-encapsulates several of his favorite themes: absurdity of war, America's prevalent loneliness, how the rich become rich. However, an interesting theme specific to Bluebeard is the discussion about art. What is art? Circe Berman stays on the best seller's list by generating volumes of teen novels while Paul Salinger lives a suicidal and depressed existence trying to create introspective critiques of humanity. Dan Gregory makes paintings equivalent to being a "taxidermist" where his subjects look more real on his canvas than in real life, while the abstract expressionists make unintelligible topics. Paul Salinger and the abstract expressionists look down on the others, but which is really better? The answer might be provided with the Rabo's greatest secret. Kept in a potato barn behind his mansion, its ultimate disclosure to the world makes a dramatic statement about art.
Here we have Vonnegut at his most focused on a long time, tearing off page after page that will make you laugh and stop and think at the same time. The reader will enjoy this book on several political and philosophical levels in addition to enjoying a fine story.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By RW on 10 July 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
We've all got a potato barn, it's just not always that easy to see that anyone else will give a damn whether it's full of spuds, or nuggets. A witty, perhaps in places bleak, but ultimately hopeful journey through a life. This book is packed full of juicy nuggets right up to the point that its final vista emerges from the splendid isolation born out of decades of self-deprocation. Quite brilliantly crafted writing from an ever peculiar, and yet strangely relevant, stand-point. Some day we will all come to see the world this way and laugh. Someday. So it goes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By HellyWelly on 7 Feb. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This is the first Kurt Vonnegut I've read. It was a free download so I took a chance, expecting a novel about a pirate. Instead I got a sweet well written narrative about life itself. Very enjoyable, I will definitely read more of his books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Eileen Shaw TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 23 July 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Kurt Vonnegut has news for George Santayana, the philosopher who stated that those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. On the contrary, he says, we're doomed to repeat the past no matter what. That's what it is to be alive. Furthermore, belief is nearly the whole of the Universe, whether based on truth or not. Time, you see, is liquid. One moment is no more important than any other and all moments quickly run away.

Let's admit first of all Bluebeard is a little self-indulgent and by no means Vonnegut at the top of his form. This is not Slaughterhouse Five, Galapagos, Breakfast of Champions, or even Player Piano. He inhabits the skin of an abstract impressionist painter, someone in the same loft complex as Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, etc, but with a different kind of talent. Profoundly unfashionably, he has the gift of realism at a time when realist painters are not in vogue. Furthermore, he used a degraded set of materials for his largest and most respected abstract impressionist work. After a few years strips of it dropped from the canvas, much of it crumbled away. But he's doing all right, nevertheless, and has drawn the attention of a neighbour whose opening gambit on the beach is, "Tell me how your parents died."

Circe Birman, this personable, if discomforting, woman is to change several things in his life, not all of them for the better. What is it that he has locked away in his huge potato barn? Vonnegut's least impressive writing is worth a read. And he's right you know, time is liquid.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By shipsatsea on 16 Mar. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One of the best writers of our time - I've never been disappointed and here again his quirky style works beautifully.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dave Gilmour's cat on 8 Feb. 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Pretty much everything Vonnegut wrote is worth reading, but Bluebeard is one of his very best. The sheer warm-hearted humanity of the man - as he details the life and work of Abstract Expressionist painter Rabo Karabekian - makes this a moving, wise must-read.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback