Buy Used
£14.75
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Used Good condition book may have signs of cover wear and/or marks on corners and page edges. Inside pages may have highlighting, writing and underlining. All purchases eligible for Amazon customer service and a 30-day return policy.
Trade in your item
Get a £2.85
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Bloody Victory: The Sacrifice on the Somme and the Making of the Twentieth Century: The Battle, the Myth, the Legacy Hardcover – 2 Jul 2009


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£73.71 £7.37


Trade In this Item for up to £2.85
Trade in Bloody Victory: The Sacrifice on the Somme and the Making of the Twentieth Century: The Battle, the Myth, the Legacy for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £2.85, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 736 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown (2 July 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1408701081
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408701089
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 4.3 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 600,193 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

** 'Bill Philpott has given us a comprehensive, thoroughly researched, and vividly written reappraisal of the Somme in the longest of historical perspectives . . . His new findings and his provocative conclusions will be of exceptional importance not only for students of the battle itself but also for anyone interested in the First World War as a whole. (David Stevenson, author of 1914-1918: THE HISTORY OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR)

Required reading . . . A thoughtful and important book by a first-rate historian . . . It is a proper history of the battle, not simply an agonising account of its first day . . . He is supremely skilful in charting what he terms the battle's "shifting h (Richard Holmes)

A sweeping and authoritative re-examination of the battle . . . Bloody Victory is a magnificent and powerful book, destined to become the standard work on the subject (Christopher Silvester, Daily Express)

Comprehensive, thoroughly researched, and vividly written . . . His new findings and his provocative conclusions will be of exceptional importance (David Stevenson)

Book Description

* A major new work on the notorious First World War battle, the first to argue in significant detail for a complete overhaul of our present view of the Somme

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Pyers Symon on 5 July 2009
Format: Hardcover
This is an extraordinary book that put the Somme back into the wider context of the First War. Too many books in English only deal with the British aspect of the Battles (all of them - Philpott lists 5 although, understandably, the 1916 action dominates this book) of the Somme - some are open about this (Middlebrook states that his story deals only with the British side) but the majority ignore, for instance, the French involvement in the actions of July 1st which was crucial. Philpott queries the myth of the Somme as "something that went wrong" rather as an critical, victorious event in the middle of a long war - almost analogous to Stalingrad 27 years later. The battle destroyed the figments of any form of legitimacy in the German Government, creating a dictatorship of Ludendorff and Hindenburg who only paid lip service to the Kaiser. It effectively ensured that Germany could not win the war - the March 21st 1918 offensive not withstanding.

The Somme is remembered as a national tragedy - especially in Northern Ireland (and in places such as Newfoundland as well as the homes of the Pals Battalions). Philpott argues, convincingly, that the Somme should be remembered as a victory - albeit one not recognised at the tme.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Chris Baker VINE VOICE on 31 May 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is the best book on the Great War that I have read in many a year. Well written in an engaging style, it is founded on excellent research and good, common sense. It single-handedly destroys much of the mythology and misunderstanding of the 1916 Battle of the Somme and I applaud the author for that.

The Somme was not about one day, as so many books, TV programmes, press articles and battlefield tours would still have us believe. It was a huge affair of several quite different phases over five months, in which it could be argued that the British army finally came to the big boy's game. "Bloody Victory" puts it into proper context - and that means concentration on French strategy, tactics and fighting, for they dominated the reason why Britain fought this battle and why it fought they way it did, where it did, and when it did. I learned a great deal from this book about the French part of the Somme: the leadership struggles, tactical development and the stages of the fighting. Philpott argues clearly with regard to the Allies attritional strategy, highlights great successes in September 1916 and the over-long plunge into morale-sapping fights in the mud and dark of October and November. Out of it all comes a sense that the British army had come on by leaps and bounds from 1 July to the successful assaults of November, not least in the realisation that man for man, this new army was the equal of the world's best. For Britain, the Somme was not seen at the time as a defeat - far from it - but somehow (not least thanks to the self-interested poison pens of Churchill and Lloyd George) it soon came to feel like it was. The author explores French, British and German operations, effects and legacies in truly masterly fashion.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Bird on 13 May 2010
Format: Hardcover
William Philpott was presented with the Templer Medal Book Prize for BLOODY VICTORY by HRH The Duke of Kent, Patron of The SOCIETY FOR ARMY HISTORICAL RESEARCH, which awards the annual prize, in April 2010. There can be few more deserving recipients. Although no amount of revisionism can disguise the awful British defeat of July 1, 1916 [the French faring better] the author convincingly argues that the five battles of the Somme, of which the 1916 battle was critical, must be taken together and that their effect was to destroy the German army's ability to win the war. This might not have seemed evident to a jittery Haig in the Kaiser's offensive of March 1918, but that gamble foundered through the ruptures of command, government and manpower caused on the Somme, albeit fanned by the attrition at Ypres, and the blockade.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A. J. Hampshire on 20 Jan. 2010
Format: Hardcover
Bloody Marvellous.
This is an outstanding contribution to our understanding of the war on the Western Front in WW1. It's beautifully written. Dr Philpott's knowledge of the French army is profound, and he brings out clearly how they were fighting the Germans on something like equal terms while the raw British citizen army was painfully learning the necessary techniques.
After reading this book my respect for Haig, Rawlinson and the fighting men of the British and Commonwealth armies is in no way diminished, but I have learnt a valuable lesson about the character and professional skill of Foch and his hard-fighting French army.
In my opinion Bloody Victory is destined to take its place, like Michael Howard's Franco-Prussian War, as the standard work on its subject.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback