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Bloody Men
 
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Bloody Men

20 Nov 2006 | Format: MP3

£11.85 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £12.77 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:39
30
2
4:41
30
3
4:47
30
4
4:06
30
5
4:16
30
6
3:39
30
7
4:40
30
8
4:12
30
9
5:57
30
10
5:41
Disc 2
30
1
2:48
30
2
4:09
30
3
3:18
30
4
2:56
30
5
2:52

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 20 Nov 2006
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Park Records
  • Copyright: (c) 2009 Park Records
  • Total Length: 1:02:41
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0027VCJRW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 48,931 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Brian on 12 Dec 2006
Format: Audio CD
Bloody Men is one of Steeleye's most consistently good albums. There's not a bad track on it, but I'll list a few that I think stand out: Whummil Bore, which is achingly beautiful and poignant. The 3 Sisters and Lord Elgin are both very catchy and up tempo. The Bonny Black Hare is a bawdy song with a pulsating (or should that be throbbing?) beat, and has Maddy Prior singing a decidedly masculine part (!). Then there's the spooky Demon of the Well, nice to hear them still doing the gothic stuff.

Ken Nicol makes a significant contribution and continues to show that his inclusion in Steeleye was an inspired move. So too does Rick Kemp. Apart from a rocky reworking of Cold Haily Windy Night , he gives us Ned Ludd, a suite of songs revolving around the Luddite uprising and Peterloo massacre. It starts off gently and builds up to a powerful climax.

All in all, an excellent album with the entire band on top form.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By N. A. Ralls on 23 Dec 2006
Format: Audio CD
BLOODY MEN is the deeply atmospheric, powerful, melodic and very poignant album from the legendary Steeleye Span. The beautiful and enchanting voice of Maddy Prior combined with the inspirational words and music of Rick Kemp on the five part Ned Ludd track on the second CD make this latest offering even more magnificent.

Rick's painstaking research into the history of the Luddites has paid off with a marvellous and very moving piece that can be played over and over again... it is so meaningful and awe inspiring.

The band, who have lost none of their earlier magic and gained even more along the way, offered up some of this great album during their recent UK tour which was sensational.

There is not a track to disappoint - another great one is the strong Demon of the Well from Ken Nicol - and the contrast and quality of each one combine to ensure this Steeleye album is a must have for every fan and those who have yet to discover the miracle that is Steeleye Span. Fiddler Peter Knight is a gift in himself and his Lord Elgin is a memorable and very beautiful piece that is truly wonderful. Liam Genockey on drums and percussion excels as always...

Long may Steeleye continue. The music scene is a much better place for them being there!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. McAleese on 2 July 2008
Format: Audio CD
OK, it's not their best album; but Steeleye Span have really pulled another superb album out of the hat! At times, you wonder if you are still listening to the same band who made us cringe with delight at "One Misty, Moisty Morning" and "Spotted Cow" etc.
The opening smut-fest, Bonny Black Hare sees the sweet and charming Maddy Prior grinding out a super-innuendous ballad, which is essentially 1 part folk and 5 parts rock! She pulls it off with such force and verve, you find yourself oddly shaken up, but also quite refreshed by the end. Peter Knight's accompaniment on the octave (or baritone) violin adds further depth to this seriously powerful song.
Ken Nicol and Peter Knight pull us right back to the theme of folk again with The Story of the Scullion King, a rich and engaging tale, put fantastically to music. The cheery tune, superb instrumentals and pleasingly simple lyrics add to this catchy piece.
Ken and Maddy worked together to produce The Dreamer and the Widow. Maddy's vocals are still beautifully haunting and the tune is certainly tear-jerking. The powerful message in the final verse is I'm sure one that many can relate to!
Peter Knight, Peter Knight, Peter Knight! What are we going to do with you? After the less than engaging Bride's Farewell, I was always concerned that Peter was very hit-or-miss (Bride's Farewell = miss. Let Her Go Down = hit. Harvest of the Moon = hit-and-miss. - to name but a few examples). However, Knight really has pulled off the gem of the album with Lord Elgin! No one could honestly say Peter Knight was a master-lyricist, but his simple words, exquisite harmonies and melodies, combined with his increasingly sensational instrumentals make him a great member of the band, and I now will always look forward to his input on any future albums!
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