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Bloody Good [Mass Market Paperback]

Georgia Evans
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Book Description

2 July 2009
While the sounds of battle echo through the sky, a lady doctor has more than enough trouble to keep her busy even in a sleepy hamlet outside London. But the threat is nearer home than Alice knows. German agents have infiltrated her beloved countryside - Nazis who can fly, read minds, and live forever. They're not just fascists. They're vampires. Alice has no time for fantasy, but when the corpses start appearing sucked dry, she'll have to accept help where she can get it. If that includes a lowly Conscientious Objector who says he's no coward though he refuses to fight, and her very own grandmother, a sane, sensible woman who insists that she's a Devonshire Pixie, so be it. Indeed, whatever it takes to defend home and country from an evil both ancient and terrifyingly modern...

Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Kensington Publishing; 1 edition (2 July 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0758234813
  • ISBN-13: 978-0758234810
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 10.4 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,602,530 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very Entertaining 8 Jan 2010
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is the first book in Georgia Evans' World War 2 paranormal series. I found this book really easy to get into from the first page and I was taken to a place that is quintessentially English, with lots of tea drinking and gossiping. This is quite true of English culture, we do like to drink lots of tea, and we do like to sit around and have a good gossip while drinking it: it's just what we do!

There's great atmosphere to this book and you really get an essence of English country life during the war. The characters are well rounded, interesting and likable. There is Alice, the very attractive village doctor; Helena, her grandmother and Devonshire Pixie; the village bobby, Sgt Howell Pendragon, the resident shapeshifting dragon; Gloria, the district nurse and werefox; Samuel, the local grocer and elf; and Peter, Alice's love interest, who is just plain human and can't believe these people exist. And, of course not forgetting, the German, vampire nazis...

Although this story is set around the time of WW2, it's emphasis is more on the characters in the village and the vampires. The war is merely a backdrop and doesn't get too bogged down with lots of historical data. This isn't a frightening, scary or gory read, it's light, fun and easy reading. A bit like Agatha Christie but with vampires, and without the mystery, and Miss Marple... but you get the idea - the feeling of an old fashioned story with old fashioned values.

The dialogue flows easily and is quite humorous at times with no swearing. So, that's why when I got to the loves scenes, I was shocked! After many chapters of innocent Alice, dear old grandma Helena and lots of old fashioned tea drinking - WHAM! Sex! Using words that made me blush!
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Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  20 reviews
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best New Fantasy Series I've Found in 3 Years 14 July 2009
By SailorLawyer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
If Mary Stewart and Charlotte McLeod had collaborated on a paranormal novel about rural English village life in early WWII, I think the result might have been something like this. Author Georgia Evans has written a tale that accurately incorporates the uncertainty and hardship of the Blitz into a larger story line that includes romance (a really good one!), magic, intrigue, and all the absorbing social detail you could expect of a really well-written "cozy." In fact, Evans' portrayal of the daily lives and attitudes of her characters has an authentic feel I would compare to Rhys Bowen and Mary Stewart novels of similar setting. The tone is light--impressively so, given the seriousness of some subject matter--but never silly, and Evans has written her paranormal elements (vampires, witches, pixies, etc.) into the tale with a deftness that makes their existence seem no more unbelievable than that of the Nazis. I think the similarity of the cover art to that of Charlaine Harris' Sookie Stackhouse novels is probably not an accident.

The characters of "Bloody Good" are likable and well-crafted, and the prologue establishes a premise that should comfortably stretch over several more novels while still providing readers of "Bloody Good" with the ingredients for a proper ending. This book could function perfectly well as a stand-alone novel but, even still, I ran out and bought "Bloody Awful" as soon as I finished.

I noticed another reviewer complained of the book being politically inconsistent and I have to disagree. Because this book is really the first installment of a series, many plot elements have not yet been explained, but everything so far revealed has been consistent with the idea of vampires who sympathize with the Nazi agenda while also pursuing their own goals. Also, the inclusion of facts about the Holocaust (for which the same reviewer seemed to be arguing) would have been puzzling and perhaps anachronistic in a novel about the English countryside in 1940, when the average English citizen had little or no knowledge of the genocide taking place of mainland Europe.

If "Bloody Good" has a weakness, it's probably that the climax is a bit anti-climactic; the disposal of the bad guy is pretty abrupt. I greatly enjoyed exploring the world and characters Georgia Evan's has created here, however, and eagerly look forward to the "Bloody Right."
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very Entertaining 8 Jan 2010
By Book Chick City - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is the first book in Georgia Evans' World War 2 paranormal series. I found this book really easy to get into from the first page and I was taken to a place that is quintessentially English, with lots of tea drinking and gossiping. This is quite true of English culture, we do like to drink lots of tea, and we do like to sit around and have a good gossip while drinking it: it's just what we do!

There's great atmosphere to this book and you really get an essence of English country life during the war. The characters are well rounded, interesting and likable. There is Alice, the very attractive village doctor; Helena, her grandmother and Devonshire Pixie; the village bobby, Sgt Howell Pendragon, the resident shapeshifting dragon; Gloria, the district nurse and werefox; Samuel, the local grocer and elf; and Peter, Alice's love interest, who is just plain human and can't believe these people exist. And, of course not forgetting, the German, vampire nazis...

Although this story is set around the time of WW2, it's emphasis is more on the characters in the village and the vampires. The war is merely a backdrop and doesn't get too bogged down with lots of historical data. This isn't a frightening, scary or gory read, it's light, fun and easy reading. A bit like Agatha Christie but with vampires, and without the mystery, and Miss Marple... but you get the idea - the feeling of an old fashioned story with old fashioned values.

The dialogue flows easily and is quite humorous at times with no swearing. So, that's why when I got to the loves scenes, I was shocked! After many chapters of innocent Alice, dear old grandma Helena and lots of old fashioned tea drinking - WHAM! Sex! Using words that made me blush! Now, I'm no prude but this was so out of context that it made me cringe rather than feel all hot and bothered. Sometimes I think certain explicit words are used that really don't have to be. If certain words that were used were toned down a touch, it would have been much more successful, but instead I winced and squirmed in discomfort. Saying that, I did enjoy reading about the relationship between Alice and Peter, most of the time it was sweet and innocent and much needed in a time of war.

Verdict:

However, overall this book is very entertaining, light-hearted and fun and I would definitely recommend it, (as long as you can cope with the explicit sex scenes!).

(I gave this book 7/10 on my blog)
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars (2.5) Great setting, great characters, weird pacing, bad copy editing. 31 Aug 2009
By Kelly (Fantasy Literature) - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I'm always glad to see a vampire novel that moves away from stereotypical plots and settings. So, when I learned that Georgia Evans's _Bloody Good_ was set in England during World War II and that its vampires were Nazi secret agents, I was immediately intrigued.

_Bloody Good_ is at its best when depicting the struggles of ordinary country folk during the war. Through the many neighborly chats that fill these pages, the reader gets an idea of what it might have been like to deal with air raids, rationing, and the experience of either being an evacuee or having an evacuee billeted in one's home. For several of Brytewood's residents, who are secretly supernatural beings, hiding their true nature is a further challenge. Evans does a great job of showing a cozy setting in ominous times.

I also loved the scenes with Bela, a fairy who has been taken captive by Nazis and forced to use her powers to serve the Third Reich. Her struggle to reestablish communication with her family, and her clever ways of deceiving the Nazis without technically lying, are captivating. I can't wait to see more of her.

Where _Bloody Good_ stumbles is in the pacing of two of the plot threads: the vampire-saboteur plot and the romance plot. The vampires don't really do much, and the resolution of this plotline is anticlimactic. Meanwhile, heroine Alice Doyle and hero Peter Watson fall in love at lightning speed. I didn't find it as believable as I'd have liked, especially since in the early chapters their attraction is more "told" than "shown." Then, suddenly, they're having wild sex and talking marriage. (I believe they've known each other for a few weeks at this point.) The romance plot is prominent enough that it feels like the main plot, making the vampire stuff more of a subplot, and so it was disappointing that it developed in a way that I found unrealistic.

In addition, _Bloody Good_ needed more copyediting. There are numerous typos, and a distracting frequency of sentences beginning with "Seemed," which more stringent copyediting might have been able to tame.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Can You Go Wrong With Nazi Vampires? 12 July 2009
By Tracy Davis - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I choose this book because the concept of Nazi vampires was just too hard to resist. And certainly, Evans delivers on the atmosphere of WWII England: the rationing, the blackouts, the evacuees from London; and the protagonists (Dr. Alice Doyle and Peter Watson) are empathetic. What I missed, however, is the Nazi vampires making more of an impact; although the book starts off with the invasion of four bloodsuckers, only one gets any depth (and I didn't think it enough), and their evil plot to overthrow England doesn't really seem to be of importance in the overall sequence of events. The human (and 'Other' human-like) characters fare well, and would be at home in any Masterpiece Theatre miniseries; think of it as 'All Creatures Great and Small' with vampires, pixies and dragons. What disconcerted me in all this, and what I personally thought out of place, were the rather explicit love scenes; it was as if another author stepped in with some graphic text. I will read at least one more of the series to see if it gels with me. I think this novel worth reading, but I don't think it lived up to the concept.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Take on magical beings 15 July 2009
By Shannon M. Mcgee - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This book takes place in England during World War II. The main character is Alice Doyle, doctor of the area of Brytewood, England. Strange things begin to happen in the area, such as missing patients and murdered neighbors. Those murdered are missing blood. Brytewood's legends include many magical beings that Alice denies are real, even though her heritage indicates she's a Pixie. She is also not looking for love, but may find it in Peter, her assistant.
I like the idea of this story because it is interesting to mix the War with vampires, pixies, dragons and more. But I don't think enough was told about the magical creatures. I want to hear more back ground, but maybe that is why this is a first book in a series of three.
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