Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £5.99

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Bloodflowers [VINYL]


Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Amazon's The Cure Store

Music

Image of album by The Cure

Photos

Image of The Cure

Biography

Biography by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Out of all the bands that emerged in the immediate aftermath of punk rock in the late '70s, few were as enduring and popular as the Cure. Led through numerous incarnations by guitarist/vocalist Robert Smith (born April 21, 1959), the band became notorious for its slow, gloomy dirges and Smith's ghoulish appearance, a public image that often ... Read more in Amazon's The Cure Store

Visit Amazon's The Cure Store
for 140 albums, 28 photos, discussions, and more.

Product details

  • Vinyl (14 Feb 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Fiction
  • ASIN: B00004WQ93
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,711,624 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 Feb 2000
Format: Audio CD
Not since "Disintegration" has a cure album affected me in such a deep way. Just when you might doubt he still has it, Robert Smith releases "Bloodflowers;" which is a little irony in itself as the song "39" is about that very doubt. There is something ineffable about The Cure, something that touches our souls. This album is very dark, and ponderously melancholic. To answer the question that many of you have been dying to know, does this album harken back to "Disintegration?" I can answer yes and no. It's dark and very similar to "Disintegration" but different. Robert is philosophical in songs like "Where Birds Always Sing" and is expressive of his feelings, in songs like "The Loudest Sound" and "There is No If," both songs are about the tragic nature of love and life and reminiscent of "Faith" and "Disintegration," but closer to "Disintegration." There are songs that are tragic, angry and sad like "Watching Me Fall" (where we find out that Robert can still hold a note. It reminds me of "Prayers for Rain") and "39." The theme is that we get old, and that nothing lasts forever. It is neither fair nor unfair, most poignantly demonstrated in "Bloodflowers," " The Last Day Of Summer," and "39" which also happens to be Robert's age--hard to believe, yes? I never thought I would see the day when my favorite rock artist would see 40. So is The Cure over the hill? Not, if they keep this up! I know I will be spending many rainy nights with this album. Like "Disintegration" I can't say I have a favorite song. It depends on my mood; one day it might be "The Loudest Sound," another "39" or maybe "Watching Me Fall.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 May 2001
Format: Audio CD
The Cure edged into new territory with Wild Mood Swings, but nevertheless drew scorn from certain quarters because it eschewed goth rock for pop, both pure and twisted. For 2000's Bloodflowers, Robert Smith decided to give the people what they wanted: a classic Cure album, billed as the third part of a trilogy begun with Pornography and continued with Disintegration. That turns out to be more or less true, since Bloodflowers boasts all of the Cure's signatures: stately tempos, languid melodies, spacious arrangements, cavernous echoes, morose lyrics, keening vocals, long running times. If that's all you're looking for, Bloodflowers delivers in spades. If you want something transcendent, you're out of luck, since the album falls short of the mark, largely because it sounds too self-conscious. As one song segues into the next, it feels like Smith is striving to make a classic Cure record, putting all the sounds in place before he constructs the actual songs. That makes for a good listening experience, especially for fans of Disintegration, but it never catches hold the way that record did, for two simple reasons: there isn't enough variation between the songs for them to distinguish themselves, nor are there are enough sonic details to give individual tracks character. While Disintegration had goth monoliths, it also had pristine pop gems and elegant neo-psychedelia; with a couple of exceptions, the songs on Bloodflowers all feel like cousins of "Pictures of You." The album is certainly well made, and even enjoyable; however, its achievement is a bit hollow, since it never seems like Smith is pushing himself or the band. Nobody else can come close to capturing the Cure's graceful gloom, but it's hard to shake the suspicion that Bloodflowers could have been something grand if he had shaken up the formula slightly.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Feb 2000
Format: Audio CD
Bloodflowers is The Cure's 20th album in 22 years and is reputed to be the final part in a trilogy begun in 1982 with Pornography and centred around the band's creative highpoint, 1989's Disintegration. Most of what they've released before and after Disintegration inevitably fell under the shadow of its epic, swooning grace. Perhaps wisely, the band have never tried to recreate the elegant mystery contained therein and instead ploughed a lighter furrow throughout the nineties. Until now that is:
Arriving 11 years and seven albums (only two of which containing new material) later, Bloodflowers is a worthy sequel to Disintegration. Clocking in at almost an hour, with only nine tracks, there's little room here for throwaway pop. Every song has been carefully thought out and exceptionally rendered. That unmistakable yearning quality has returned to singer Robert Smith's voice as the music sweeps the listener along in endless innocence. Indeed the whole album feels like a luscious manifestation of childhood dreams and secrets.
Opening track Out of this World is simple yet effective. It builds on a gentle acoustic guitar, reminiscent of Disintegration's Untitled, as Smith wistfully reminisces "when we look back at it all as I know we will, you and me wide eyed. I wonder will we really remember how it feels to be this alive". Better still is The Last Day of Summer, where melodies fall from the sky as Smith laments the changes life forces upon you as you grow older in the most beautifully naïve way: "Nothing I am, nothing I dream, nothing is new, nothing I think or believe in or say, nothing is true. It used to be so easy, I never even tried".
Elsewhere 39 and, particularly, Watching Me Fall evoke memories of Disintegration's glorious title track.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback