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Blood Relative Hardcover – 22 Oct 1998


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: W&N; First Edition edition (22 Oct. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0575066083
  • ISBN-13: 978-0575066083
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 2.6 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 178,359 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

A fascinating and astonishing story of survival and conspiracy theories.

About the Author

Michael Gray is the author's adopted name. He does not know what his real Christian name would have been. He does, however know that his surname would have been Romanov. Gray's contention is that his father was Tsarevich Alexei and his grandparents were Nicholas and Alexandria.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Oct. 2004
Format: Hardcover
Excellent, and casts doubts on information we have been fed over the past about the story of the last Russian Tsar and hisFamily. A good read for anybody with interest in this topic. Very plausible. Note the photographs of the author and the likeness to other Royals.I am surprised that this book has not been the topic of debate since it was published.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 April 1999
Format: Hardcover
This well composed volume careens between two premises. First of all, is it not plausible that if anyone in the Russian Imperial family had escaped the worst of the holocaust, they would never have admitted it? The claims of Mr. Gray on behalf of the mysterious Mr. Chebotarev are aided and abetted by this factor. Secondly, assuming that the Tsarevich suffered martyrdom with the rest of his family and that he was burnt to ashes, any claims that he in fact did not would form the basis of an interesting pathological study or at least a gripping romance. On such grounds, either possibility would appeal to the sort of person that could not 'accept' the overwhelming evidence that the entire family was slain. This would be an entirely engrossing romance if it limited itself to the discussion of the mysterious Chebotarev, lured people with the title 'But I Am Also Alexei', and then left the reader to form his or her own rightful conclusions. From a scientific point of view, some weaknesses emerge. How can one assume that the Tsarevich had inherited certain crucial genetic material if the boy was missing? And why didn't any genetic analysis of the man on whose behalf the claim is made figure more strongly into the picture? Here is where the fantasy and the pathology lie. A well written and strongly persuasive one, to be sure, reading far more smoothly than the recent 'Escape of Alexei' to English speaking readers. But so long as the child's bones have not been produced, we no doubt will have more books like this. An audience fascinated with the real, sad, romantic tale of this tragic child is out there to devour them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Aquilonian on 19 April 2014
Format: Hardcover
This is a fascinating book, though not entirely for the reasons intended by its author. His diligence and courage are commendable, and I don't doubt that he believes his own theories. He has however been systematically deceived and manipulated by certain persons serving their own political agenda. Indeed, this manipulation is the most interesting element of the book.

The author's main contentions are as follows.

Firstly, that the Tsarevich Alexei, son of the last Tsar of Russia, was not killed by the Bolsheviks, and that the bodies purported to be the Russian royal family were substitutes.

Secondly, that Alexei, and in fact the whole Russian royal family, were spirited away as part of a deal with the British Government in exchange for recognition of the Bolsheviks as the legitimate government of Russia.

Thirdly, that Alexei was given a new identity as Nikolai Chebotarev, an obscure character who moved in Russian émigré circles in Ireland.

Fourthly, that Chebotarev secretly married Princess Marina, widow of Prince George the Duke of Kent, younger brother of King George VI, and that a son was born of this marriage and again given a false identity and brought up by adoptive parents in Northern Ireland.

Finally and most sensationally, that Mr Gray himself is this hidden son of Chebotarev/Alexei, and is thus the grandson of Tsar Nicholas II.

Mr Gray's theory is shakiest on the first point, due to his having little understanding of DNA testing, nor indeed any scientific education. Instead he selects his scientific findings from whichever scientists happen to agree with his thesis, ignoring those who don't.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bunny on 9 Sept. 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is a fascinating story and a book I have wanted to read for some time but could not find a copy. The copy I ordered - a former library copy - is in excellent condition. the book arrived in a very short time and was well packaged. The author explains how he researched his 'roots' - and believes he is the son of the Tsar's son, Alexei, who he maintains was not killed in 1918, as history has claimed. Certainly gives food for thought! Some passages are rather confusing as he refers to the names of a lot of different people - some of whom are relevant to his claim and some are not.
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15 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Oct. 1998
Format: Hardcover
If you're looking for a good, well writen read about something you've probably never read before then 'Blood Relative' is for you. If you want to believe it, it is not. This book makes for a very interesting read but it is ONLY that. It comes over as pure fiction written in a style that would suggest that the truth is anything but what you are reading. The bare bones of a semi-true story is there but it is bolstered by too much guess-work, heresay, wishful thinking and downright fantasy to be anything other than the product of a very good imagination.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Thubten Namdrol on 21 Feb. 2011
Format: Hardcover
I have read the book carefully and I beleive tha author's assumptions.. More light towards proving that the entire Imperial family survived. It will be interesting to do DNA testing on Cheboterev's remains.
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