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Blind
 
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Blind

3 Mar 2003 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 8.56 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
4:04
2
4:45
3
2:40
4
2:45
5
2:24
6
4:51
7
4:33
8
3:58
9
3:31
10
3:41
11
3:42

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 5 Oct 1992
  • Release Date: 5 Oct 1992
  • Label: Parlophone UK
  • Copyright: 1992 Parlophone Records Ltd. This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 1992 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 40:54
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001IMAD8S
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 29,636 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Leon on 19 Nov 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
In my opinion this is a beautiful album with real depth. David's guitar playing is wonderfully creative and Harriet's voice conveys so much emotion. I have a vinyl copy and have been thinking of buying it on CD, but it reminds me of what was happening for me around the time of its release and in a way it may be too painful to listen to again at the moment. Music can do that sometimes.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By "phatharry" on 1 Oct 2003
Format: Audio CD
Weirdly, I remember this album coming out to lukewarm reviews originally. I loved 'Goodbye' as a single, and so bought the album, having no previous experience of rrr (the first album). To me this was a remarkable record and also began my long-standing beef with the pop music press. So what if it's not much different to the first one? I didn't care then, and I don't care now (I still haven't heard rrr). Maybe it is a good idea not to listen to rrr first - I don't know. In actual fact, considering the amount of sheer joy this album has bought me, and the fact that listening to the first one seems to prejudice people against Blind, I would say junk rrr and buy this instead. Anyhow, enough postmodern biog, and onto the music.
It's really, really good. Just great songs. Nothing formulaic - I can't really bring to mind any middle-eights or guitar solos, just beautiful words and harmonies. And speaking of guitars, if you were ever under the impression that the only thing you can do with a guitar is 'folk strum', 'rock distortion' or 'funk riff', listen to this. I'm not saying it's as groundbreaking sonically as someone like Hendrix, but the depth of range of tone and texure is fantastic, bouyed up by sparkling production.
I respectfully disagree with people who refer to this record as 'folksy twanging', or indeed 'folksy anything'. I respectfully disagree with the opinion that this is a let-down after rrr. I respectfully suggest that you buy this record - it's like a fresh summer morning.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Not sure why this album passed me by first time round as the three Rs totally enthralled so much that it blew out my Sony Walkman.. after which I witnessed the band on their RRR tour supporting Throwing Muses. Harriet's opening rendition of 'Skin and Bones' laced with David's mesmeric guitar work instantly grabbed the attention of the audience - a memory I will never forget.

Moving over to Blind it is not as adventurous or raw as RRR - at first serving up a more polished set of songs some of which have the strings and keyboard treatment patently absent from the first album. The lack of hit singles, the birth of Grunge and a far less well received third album probably meant a premature end, regardless of the noble pursuit of raising a family, and there does not appear to be any signs of reemergence no matter that many bands of a bygone era continue to replenish their pension pots!

As many reviewers have pointed out the indebtedness of the Cocteau Twins, in particular Liz Frazer, and Johnny Marr are apposite .. I might also say the minimalism of Galaxie 500 as contemporaries, particularly on 'God Made Me' is also apparent. The interweaving of guitar styles with the hauntingly prepubescent vocal quality of Harriet whose lyrics fleet by like lost impressions rather than soulful invocations provide a musical canvas to the distanced commentary of post teenage travails. There is also the dabbling in the religious or New Age (depending on your persuasion) such as the jauntingly racing tempo of 'Love' with the self-affirming message of "love yourself".

Technically, this album sees the use of drive effects on a number of tracks which were not so evident on RRR.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr Ticko on 18 Jan 2011
Format: Audio CD
The Sundays second album released in 1992 on the DGC label is a very different album to their first "Reading, Writing and Arithmetic" released four years earlier. As a band they certainly seem to have a greater ambition, with a bigger pedal effects guitar sound echoing the "Shoegazing" scene of the time. Wheelers vocal performance is typically superb especially on tracks "life and Soul", "Love" and the two singles "Goodbye" and "Wild Horses". Prehaps due to the criticism of the first album her lyrics seem much more serious and oblique, it seems no coincidence that they are all printed inside the CD's sleeve this time.

"Blind" is often criticised for it's poor production, and in truth this record does benefit from a decent stereo. However the dense swirling guitar sound which comes to dominate also gives a somewhat darker overall feel which complements the bands sense of melancholy to good effect. Despite a couple of minor hits including a brilliant cover of the Stones "Wild Horses", this album failed to break the band in the UK or America and the band disappeared again until reemerging with their third, excellent album "Static and Silence" a few years later.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 Dec 2000
Format: Audio CD
I feel the debut is marginally a better album, but that Blind has a better, more textured sound to it. The songs are not the equal though; "Love", "Goodbye" and "24 Hours" are wonderful, as the shimmering, opulent "On Earth", but too many of the songs are quite unmemorable. Harriet Wheeler's singing is even better than on the debut, while the music seems more rounded, if often seemingly to prop up songs which aren't that involving.
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