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Bleeder (Wide Screen) [DVD] [2000]

Kim Bodnia , Mads Mikkelsen , Nicolas Winding Refn    Suitable for 18 years and over   DVD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: 4.48 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Bleeder (Wide Screen) [DVD] [2000] + Pusher Trilogy [DVD] + Valhalla Rising [DVD]
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Product details

  • Actors: Kim Bodnia, Mads Mikkelsen, Zlatko Buric, Liv Corfixen, Levino Jensen
  • Directors: Nicolas Winding Refn
  • Format: Anamorphic, PAL, Widescreen
  • Language: Danish
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Metrodome Video
  • DVD Release Date: 1 Jan 2008
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004UEWS
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 34,743 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

'Pusher' director Nikolas Winding Refn returns with another hard-hitting tale of urban malaise. Leo (Kim Bodnia) is not pleased when he discovers that his girlfriend Louise (Rikki Louise Andersson) has become pregnant. He begins spending his evenings with his friend, the video store worker Lenny, and Louise's aggressive gangster brother, Louis. Later, after Louise unexpectedly invites a young mother and her children back to the flat, Leo becomes violent towards her and his destructive behaviour eventually triggers a violent chain of events culminating in tragedy and death.

Product Description

United Kingdom released, PAL/Region 2 DVD: LANGUAGES: Danish ( Dolby Digital 5.1 ), English ( Subtitles ), WIDESCREEN, SPECIAL FEATURES: Interactive Menu, Scene Access, Trailer(s), SYNOPSIS: Danish filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn follows up his intense crime drama Pusher with this story of a young couple living on the edges of society. Leo and Louise (Kim Bodnia and Rikke Louise Andersson) are in love and share a flat; Leo likes to go drinking with his buddies and watch action movies on the VCR, while Louise prefers quiet nights at home. Louise's brother Louis (Levino Jensen) is a racist thug who imagines himself an underworld kingpin. Lenny (Mads Mikkelsen) is a friend of Leo's who loves movies but is painfully shy around women; when he finally works up the nerve to ask Lea (Liv Corfixen), a waitress at an all-night diner, for a date, a mix-up finds the two seeing the same film but at different theaters. While Leo seems better adjusted with his friends, that begins to change when Louise informs him that she's going to have a baby. Leo doesn't react well to the news: he becomes remote and begins to turn violent, as a long-held self-loathing finally begins to rise to the surface. Bleeder received strong notices, particularly for the performances by Kim Bodnia and Rikke Louise Andersson, in its showings at the 1999 Venice and Haugesund Film Festivals.
SCREENED/AWARDED AT: Venice Film Festival, ...Bleeder

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought-provoking Danish drama. 9 Jun 2012
By J. Mcdonald TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
Nicolas Winding Refn`s second feature film after the tour-de-force gangster story that was "Pusher", is a rather different, though no less provocative affair.
"Bleeder" from 1999, is more of a stylised social drama which re-unites the leading cast members from the previous film, this time as a group of friends who hang-out around the local video store getting together to watch crime/martial-arts movies. The main characters are Leo and Lenny played by Bodnia and Mikkelsen respectively; the drama centres around Leo`s reaction to his partner`s announcement that she is pregnant - something the immature, gloomy underachiever Leo is not prepared for, resulting in violent and destructive outbursts, eventually bringing him into conflict with Louis, his partner`s volatile and ever-so-slightly psychotic brother.
A gentler, amusing sub-plot is the tentative relationship between the socially inept film-geek Lenny and bookworm waitress Lea; on the surface she seems to inhabit a different intellectual world, but at one point, Lea asks the bookstore owner for books by Hubert Selby Jr. which suggests their tastes in subject matter may well be very compatible.

This is another slice of the low-end side of life in Denmark; no-one here is involved in crime with the possible exception of Louis, although it's never made clear just what Leo`s work is - he certainly has one dodgy connection.There are some nasty racist scenes involving Louis and the violence - when it comes - is all the more shocking for its unexpectedness - especially the scenes of domestic violence. It's a tragic story, but with some very funny moments.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Love beneath the violence 3 Nov 2000
By A Customer
Format:DVD
Bleeder is a very tough movie, but is at the same time extremely funny in many of its scenes. The change between tragic horror and amusement does not seem artificial at all.
Although at first glance it is an extremely violent film, it really is about love as well as human tragedy.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars for danish film fans only 21 May 2012
By cartoon
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
Im not so sure about this film , it seemed rather dated and didnt really get any where . I loved the Pusher trilogy so I was maybe expecting far too much . Interesting to see very young Mads Mikkelsen and Kim Bodnia [ The Bridge].
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars CONTEMPORARY TRAGEDY 22 Mar 2006
By Anton Ilinski - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
I really liked previous reviewer Endless Mike's thought about "Pusher" being Danish "Mean Streets" and "Bleeder" being Danish "Taxi Driver". Although I haven't seen "Pusher" yet, now I guess I can make up my mind about it, well sort of. And now I'm definately after this film because "Bleeder" proved to be rather solid, thoughtful and mind-blowing experience. De Niro's Travis Bickle was a war vet, and character of Leo in "Bleeder" is deforming mentally in our peaceful times which is more terrible as I think.

First thing you notice when watching is that all the main characters' names begin with L: Leo, Lenni, Lea, Louis, Louise... Haven't figured out yet what Nicolas Refn was alluding to, but maybe I will.

"Bleeder" is one of those recent European movies telling everything is not quite OK in cozy and trouble-free Europe. Actually everything is very-very wrong. "Man Bites Dog", "Funny Games", "Trouble Every Day", "In My Skin" and Lars von Trier's (also Danish) "The Idiots" demonstrate a dangerous tendency - in the epoch of a total progress people don't need each other anymore. They all exist in their small strange worlds by themselves hence alienation and all sorts of derangements. When I said that thay don't need each other I meant all the external factors. Actually people crave communication, friendship and love, but as they unlearned to communicate they are bound to be lonely mostly. And loneliness gives birth to various kinds of perversions and mental illnesses within a man. People don't know how to get acquainted anymore, they don't understand each other at all, everyone seems to be all alone in this world. There's a brilliant scene in "Bleeder" when Lenni tries to talk to a girl he likes. Their dialog is extremely funny and at the same time very sad, because you realise it's all true. Lenni doesn't know what to talk about to a girl, seems like he sees a female for the first time in his life. Leo also has trouble with his wife who's pregnant. His life is sh*t as he says himself, he doesn't want his baby to live in such a shi*ty world. The only person close to him who could comfort him and just listen to him is his wife, but she doesn't understand him. Well, neither does he understand her. So they have to live together in an atmosphere of total estrangement. It's a contemporary tragedy - no passions a la Shakespear, just simple, quiet life which is utterly tragic, because people are isolate. In spite of the fact that "Bleeder" is pretty sad and has some disturbing scenes, Refn managed to make it rather funny at the same time. I already mentioned some dialogs - well, they all are so hilarious! There's a scene where Lenni who works in a video-store recites names of directors whom you can find there. And it's a non-stop list of about fifty, sixty or maybe even more directors! It's just awesome, you got to see it. I'd include this scene in a top-something list of best scenes in movie history.

Anyway if you watch films not just for fun, you are going to like this one. Especially if you like good-quality European cinema.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Refn does it again... 21 July 2005
By Endless Mike - Published on Amazon.com
If 'Pusher' can be seen as a Danish 'Mean Streets' then 'Bleeder' is without doubt Refn's 'Taxi Driver'. Set in the downtrodden suburbs of Copenhagen the film follows the nightmarish demise of Leo (Kim Bodnia) after his girlfriend becomes unexpectedly pregnant; already highly frustrated and resentful with life he tips over into violent psychosis. He simultaneously styles himself on his skinhead brother-in-law whilst comlpetely despising him; after an incident at a nightclub he becomes fixated on guns (a la bickle) and begins violently abusing his wife; causing the brother in law to extract terrible revenge. The incredibly harsh narrative is offset by the touching and humourous relationship between Leo's friends; video-store nerd Lenny (Mads Mikkelson) his sleazy boss Kitjo (the always excellent Zlatko Buric) and the girl Lenny loves but is too withdrawn to ask out...will he find love and aviod the same mistakes as Leo?

Bleeder is a phenomenally powerful and touching film that explores the fragilities and complexities of relationships in today's fractured society, whilst simultanously providing a meditation (via lenny) on the relationship between cinema and escapism really touches a nerve. The cast are uniformly excellent but Mikkleson and Bodnia really stand out. Refn can probably be accused of punching above his weight in a few instances (some of the dissolves are heavy handed and unneccessary) but the fact is he has pulled off an astonishing film.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars CONTEMPORARY TRAGEDY 22 Mar 2006
By Anton Ilinski - Published on Amazon.com
I really liked previous reviewer Endless Mike's thought about "Pusher" being Danish "Mean Streets" and "Bleeder" being Danish "Taxi Driver". Although I haven't seen "Pusher" yet, now I guess I can make up my mind about it, well sort of. And now I'm definately after this film because "Bleeder" proved to be rather solid, thoughtful and mind-blowing experience. De Niro's Travis Bickle was a war vet, and character of Leo in "Bleeder" is deforming mentally in our peaceful times which is more terrible as I think.

First thing you notice when watching is that all the main characters' names begin with L: Leo, Lenni, Lea, Louis, Louise... Haven't figured out yet what Nicolas Refn was alluding to, but maybe I will.

"Bleeder" is one of those recent European movies telling everything is not quite OK in cozy and trouble-free Europe. Actually everything is very-very wrong. "Man Bites Dog", "Funny Games", "Trouble Every Day", "In My Skin" and Lars von Trier's (also Danish) "The Idiots" demonstrate a dangerous tendency - in the epoch of a total progress people don't need each other anymore. They all exist in their small strange worlds by themselves hence alienation and all sorts of derangements. When I said that thay don't need each other I meant all the external factors. Actually people crave communication, friendship and love, but as they unlearned to communicate they are bound to be lonely mostly. And loneliness gives birth to various kinds of perversions and mental illnesses within a man. People don't know how to get acquainted anymore, they don't understand each other at all, everyone seems to be all alone in this world. There's a brilliant scene in "Bleeder" when Lenni tries to talk to a girl he likes. Their dialog is extremely funny and at the same time very sad, because you realise it's all true. Lenni doesn't know what to talk about to a girl, seems like he sees a female for the first time in his life. Leo also has trouble with his wife who's pregnant. His life is sh*t as he says himself, he doesn't want his baby to live in such a shi*ty world. The only person close to him who could comfort him and just listen to him is his wife, but she doesn't understand him. Well, neither does he understand her. So they have to live together in an atmosphere of total estrangement. It's a contemporary tragedy - no passions a la Shakespear, just simple, quiet life which is utterly tragic, because people are isolate. In spite of the fact that "Bleeder" is pretty sad and has some disturbing scenes, Refn managed to make it rather funny at the same time. I already mentioned some dialogs - well, they all are so hilarious! There's a scene where Lenni who works in a video-store recites names of directors whom you can find there. And it's a non-stop list of about fifty, sixty or maybe even more directors! It's just awesome, you got to see it. I'd include this scene in a top-something list of best scenes in movie history.

Anyway if you watch films not just for fun, you are going to like this one. Especially if you like good-quality European cinema.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning measured look into young men's lives 24 Feb 2013
By annie marshall - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
Extraordinary look into the face of dysfunction - several kinds. Visually interesting - much of the time the camera is still, allowing the actor(s) to do their inner thing. This and Pusher II are masterworks by NWR.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars NICOLAS WINDING REFN, OPUS 2 29 Nov 2011
By Daniel S. - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Yoiu liked Kim Bodnia, Mads Mikkelsen and Zlatko Buric in Pusher I? You will love them in BLEEDER, Nicolas Winding Refn's second film which is an important step in his career. The inspired director of Valhalla Rising is already recognizable here. BLEEDER is also a brilliant allegory about cinema with these four characters living for, living through and living according to movies. Masterpiece.
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