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Bleed a River Deep (Inspector Devlin Mystery 3) Paperback – 2 Apr 2010

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Bleed a River Deep (Inspector Devlin Mystery 3) + Gallows Lane (Inspector Devlin Mystery 2) + The Rising (Inspector Devlin Mysteries)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Pan (2 April 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330460846
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330460842
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.1 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 360,114 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Brian McGilloway was born in Derry, Northern Ireland in 1974. After studying English at Queen's University, Belfast, he took up a teaching position in St Columb's College in Derry, where he was Head of English.

His first novel, Borderlands, published by Macmillan New Writing, was shortlisted for the CWA New Blood Dagger 2007 and was hailed by The Times as 'one of (2007's) most impressive debuts.' The second novel in the series, Gallows Lane, was shortlisted for the 2009 Irish Book Awards/Ireland AM Crime Novel of the Year. The third Devlin, Bleed a River Deep, was selected by Publishers Weekly as one of their Best Books of 2010. The first DS Lucy Black novel, Little Girl Lost, became an Amazon Kindle No 1 Bestseller in 2013. The follow-up novel featuring Lucy Black, Hurt, is published in November 2013.

Brian lives near the Irish borderlands with his wife and their four children.


Product Description

Review

McGilloway's most accomplished, most gripping, and most sophisticated novel yet.'
--Tangled Web

'McGilloway improves with every novel, and the latest Inspector Devlin -- Morse without the affectations, basically -- is fast becoming an annual must-read.' --Sunday Independent

About the Author

Brian McGilloway was born in Derry, Northern Ireland in 1974, and teaches English at St Columb’s College, Derry. He lives near the Borderlands, with his wife and their two sons.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By J. R. Daniell on 9 April 2009
Format: Hardcover
A U.S diplomat is attacked, the murder of a illegal immigrant leading to people smuggling, and a gold mine with subsequent gold rush are all feathured in this 3rd outing for Inspector Devlin.
This series is set on the Irish Borders, and definitely someone I could see as a new 'Rebus'. McGilloway brings so many great characters to his stories, and there is enough tension and intrique to keep you reading to the end. The fact that Devlin is working in the borders means he cannot investigate over the borderline and this adds to the plot, and his married life and attitude is also well portrayed.
Whether your a Inspector Devlin fan or a complete virgin then I recommend everyone give Brian McGilloway a read.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Kelly on 14 July 2009
Format: Hardcover
Third book in and Devlin is still a compelling character, his evolving relationships with work and family alike having real believability. And it's not just the imperfection of the relationships, it's the man's imperfection as an investigator - the mistakes he makes and questionable retaliations - that makes him so attractive. This book still has the complexity of the previous two, which keeps the pace lively, but where Gallows Lane became a little swamped towards the end with many players in a single game here a clear division between different crimes being examined simultaneously (though they are related) makes the threads easier to follow. It does mean that a little too much happens "off camera" as Devlin can't be everywhere at once, but on balance I'd rather the divisions were there. The writing is less lyrical than book one, but arguably that's how Devlin as the narrator becomes more real.

Strongly recommend these books.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Suzan VINE VOICE on 10 May 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The setting of the Inspector Ben Devlin series, Donegal, brings a different angle to the plot as a few miles away the Irish Police jurisdiction stops and co-operation with the PSNI is required. In this novel, Jim Hendry (Devlin's counterpart) has a larger part to play and we see a relationship forming between the 2 officers which is unforced and convincing.

There is a lot going in "Bleed a River Deep", the shooting of a controversial US Senator, corporate greed, illegal immigrants, environmentalists, gold prospectors, an archeological find ... plus from the previous in the series, Patterson who is a newly promoted difficult boss. These all blend together, moving at just the right pace, which provides an absorbing read right to the end.

Ben Devlin is portrayed as a straight-forward officer with an understanding wife but he does have flaws which makes him very human. In contrast Patterson comes across as an unbelievable "Mr Nasty" with no depth to him which I felt let the novel down a little. A minor point though as this is a great read with twists and turns right to the end.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stanwegian on 10 Oct. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm probably a bit too late to usefully review this book, but it's the first I've read from Brian McGilloway and I'm quite impressed, so here goes.

This is the third novel featuring Inspector Benedict (Ben) Devlin, who works out of Lifford, County Donegal, in the Irish Republic, just across the River Liffey which divdes it from Strabane, County Tyrone, in Northern Ireland. His boss, Superintendent Harry Patterson, is newly-promoted from uniform and has a history of friction with Ben. A gold mine has been established twenty miles or so to the East of Lifford, and preparations are in hand for the official opening, which is to be performed by Cathal Hagan, a US Senator of Republican sympathies and doubtful reputation. Devlin is responsible for the associated security operation. A body is found at the mine, but turns out to be an Iron Age 'bog body' of a young woman who was apparently sacrificed. This brings archaeologists hotfoot from Dublin, and the professor in charge turns ot to be a childhood neighbour and university drinking buddy of Devlin's. Meanwhile, a man shot during an unsuccessful bank raid in Lifford proves to be an illegal immigrant from Chechnya. Back at the mine, a shanty camp is growing on the banks of a nearby river after the discovery of a nugget in the riverbed triggers a mini gold rush.

All this takes place before the Celtic Tiger stumbled into recession; there is money to be made in not altogether scrupulous ways, and this provokes a crop of protests. The offices of Eligius, a US defence company located outside Omagh, are briefly occupied, and there seems to be a link with developments over the border in the Republic.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gloria Feit on 7 Dec. 2010
Format: Paperback
As this newest book in the series begins, Inspector Benedict ("Ben") Devlin has set his sights on a very wealthy. influential and powerful man, John Weston, who he suspects is guilty of . . . something, he's not quite sure what. But his very attitude of arrogance and something akin to condescension raises Devlin's hackles. He first meets Weston at his company's sixteen acres of Donegal bogland within which sits Ireland's newest and largest goldmine; when he enters the man's office, he cannot help but look out of the windows, which allow a view "revealing both the expanse of his goldmine and, to the other side, the majesty of the Donegal landscape in which he had quite literally carved his niche." But he has come here on this day in preparation for a visit by a U.S. Senator who is about to formally open the site.

Devlin is charged with ensuring the safety of the Senator, a fierce hawk vis-à-vis the Iraq war and a harsh critic of terrorism, the latter perhaps hypocritical coming, as it did, from a politician with links to an IRA support group, which in turn had incited Ireland's own anti-war activists. That, added to threats from the environmental lobby only adds to the concern. All of which is borne out quite vividly when the man, as feared, attacked, the event made worse, for Devlin, when the attacker is recognized as the brother of a childhood friend. And for his boss, Supt. Harry Patterson, this is the last straw after a series of perceived `mistakes' [of conscience and principle] on Devlin's part, and he is suspended.
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