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Blankets Paperback – 5 Aug 2003


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Product details

  • Paperback: 592 pages
  • Publisher: Top Shelf Productions; Reprint edition (5 Aug. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1891830430
  • ISBN-13: 978-1891830433
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 3.8 x 24.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 26,948 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
"SHARED" is the sugar-coated way of saying We were TRAPPED in the same bed, as we were children and had no say in the matter. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Alistair Fitchett on 11 Aug. 2003
Format: Paperback
The drawing in Blankets is so awesome it makes me want to weep. There is such a surety to Thompson’s line that is perfectly balanced with a fragility, a supreme sympathy for what he’s drawing; imagine Modigliani drawing comics and you’re getting close. This means that Thompson’s panels are full of a sensitive confidence that is mind-blowing. The writing is fantastic too, and Blankets is a richly veined voyage of (self) discovery in which Thompson explores themes of family structure, first love and religious observance with a tenderness and a self-effacing charm that is uniquely beguiling. There are numerous passages which are hypnotically, breathtakingly beautiful; passages that leave you spell bound and utterly in thrall to the visions set in ink before you; passages that will break your heart; passages that will make it sing.
Blankets sits right up there in the pantheon of greats, is on my top shelf with Chris Ware’s 'Jimmy Corrigan', Daniel Clowes’ 'Ghost World', Chester Brown’s 'I Never Liked You', Dylan Horrocks’ 'Hicksville' and Seth’s 'It’s A Good Life, If You Don’t Weaken'. What more recommendation do you need?
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Simon Savidge Reads TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 3 Sept. 2010
Format: Paperback
`Blankets' is a graphic novel but it also feels like a fully built novel. I am not saying that I don't think the two can co-exist but it's rare when they have this effect on me personally. There are two strands running through `Blankets'. The first is the tale of two brothers Craig and Phil and their childhood in the strict, highly religious and rather scary family home in Wisconsin, the second of two young people falling in love for the very first time. In a way it's like two separate coming of age (a subject I am not normally a fan of) events and times in one persons formulative years.

What impressed me first of all was how Thompson manages to interweave these two strands in a way that isn't confusing. He doesn't need to insert `flashback' or `present' and `past' the pictures paint it all clearly (excuse the poor terminology) and what illustrations these are. I definitely wasn't expecting to have an emotional connection with this book. I thought I would be entertained and pick it up now and again. Instead I read it in three sittings, I was hooked. The pictures convey, as do the choice wordings throughout, the emotions of both growing up in the severity that Craig does and how he feels when love first hits.

The second thing that impressed me was how Craig covers a lot of modern subjects that are quite tough just in the written form (not that I am saying one medium is better than the other). Through `Blankets' Thompson encapsulates a world which at varying points features mental and physical disabilities, religion, sexuality, child abuse, depression, divorce, families and most of all love. It really has left me wondering if you can call a graphic novel epic, if so then `Blankets' is indeed a modern epic. I would be surprised, but pleasantly so, if there were any graphic novels that can better this on both artistic and emotional levels.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mr. David J. Moore on 14 Nov. 2005
Format: Paperback
I'm not a big fan of (over)analyzing art works such as this, however I have been moved to do so in this instance. Blankets is powerful, considered and tantalizing in its delivery, but it is also one of the saddest things I have ever read. I was floudering in fury having read it - I was left wanting more; ultimately, the blanket over me was an anti-climax. Adrian Tomine's Summer Blonde collection is far more gratifying in this sense, although the latter lacks Thompson's exquisite sensibility and artistic flair. If you like sad/moving stories because they reveal something essentially inspirational (i.e. in the human spirit, in the nobility of a gesture etc.) then Thompson here frustrates, beautifully - perhaps try Tomine. On the other hand, I have been moved enough to write this ...
For me, Blankets revealed Thompson as a long-lost vunerable friend, a friend I could not, and cannot, help from being hurt.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By LettyBIRD on 2 Jan. 2006
Format: Paperback
I loved this book , I am very new to the world of graphic novels, having not even read comics as a child I can't pin point the reason I decided to buy it, but I am so glad I did. The art work is as you'd expect fanatastic, but what is really beautiful is the story - such a touching and honest tale about innocence and love. If you are looking for a place to begin reading graphic novels I can not think of a better book to take that first step with.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By miwa on 21 May 2013
Format: Paperback
Blankets is a autobiographical graphic novel by Craig Thompson. Written chronologically, Blankets starts with Craig's relationship with his younger brother, Phil, when they are both young children growing up in a strict religious environment. Thompson's art is often quite sparse with a lot of blunt lining, but during scenes with Phil the art takes a turn for the bold and almost hallucinogenic as the boys imagine their bed has turned into a ship and Craig has fallen overboard. Occasionally getting into arguments and punished by their strict parents, as much as the brothers annoy and aggravate each other, they always came back to bed to huddle together from the cold outside. Rural Wisconsin is a lonely place with severe winters, and snow is a prevalent theme throughout - blanketing, suffocating, beautiful or transient as it melts away.

Craig's experiences with religion are also strong throughout his childhood and into adolescence. He regularly attends church and instilled with the fear of the Lord (including some very claustrophobic paneling when his parents discover he has drawn a "rude" picture of a naked lady and tell him that he has been influenced by Satan), but it is also how he meets his first love, at a so-called Bible Camp. Raina is drawn with lots of curvy lines and soft shading that contrasts with the rather straight, lanky lines that make up Craig's graphic equivalent (sometimes only a triangle for a nose and sharp elbows are visible under all his layers of clothes). They begin a shy first love as they correspond in letters over the following year, but it is always the winter that is theirs, and it is then Raina invites Craig over to meet her family. But as Craig discovers, not all is well with Raina and her family.

It is obvious that Blankets is a labour of love.
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